Adhesive Tape Makes Frosted Glass Transparent

Ok, we have a big forehead scratcher for you today dear readers… Why does Scotch tape make frosted glass transparent?

[Via [H]]

Advertisements
Advertisement




38 Responses to Adhesive Tape Makes Frosted Glass Transparent

  1. My guess is, and im no scientest, is the glue from the scotch tape smooths out the surface when the tape is stuck onto it, filling the pours on the glass and causing it to become clear.

    now excuse me while i go scotch tape up the shower…

  2. My guess is, and im no scientest, is the glue from the scotch tape smooths out the surface when the tape is stuck onto it, filling the pours on the glass and causing it to become clear.

    now excuse me while i go scotch tape up the shower…

  3. I would agree with dustin. Frosted glass is really just pitted on a very small scale, causing light to diffuse in all directions from the surface – kind of light microscopic prisms. The glue on the tape would unify the surface, i.e. it would fill in all the pits/bumps and bring them to nearly the same level, allowing something closer to the normal light transmission thru glass.

  4. I would agree with dustin. Frosted glass is really just pitted on a very small scale, causing light to diffuse in all directions from the surface – kind of light microscopic prisms. The glue on the tape would unify the surface, i.e. it would fill in all the pits/bumps and bring them to nearly the same level, allowing something closer to the normal light transmission thru glass.

  5. @twrntg

    Probably not. Because if you put it on the other side of the glass, it would no longer be in contact with the side that needs to be affected as others above have described. It would be like trying to scratch the silver off from the *front* of the mirror.

  6. @twrntg

    Probably not. Because if you put it on the other side of the glass, it would no longer be in contact with the side that needs to be affected as others above have described. It would be like trying to scratch the silver off from the *front* of the mirror.

  7. Now what we need is giant scotch tape, to deal with ripple glass. Hmm… perhaps not so difficult- some kind of gell with similar refractive index to glass, in a pad with a stiff, clear film on one side.

  8. Now what we need is giant scotch tape, to deal with ripple glass. Hmm… perhaps not so difficult- some kind of gell with similar refractive index to glass, in a pad with a stiff, clear film on one side.

  9. All it does is turn the matted surface smooth. The refraction, internal reflection is more uniform. I assume that the glass is frosted on only one side.

  10. All it does is turn the matted surface smooth. The refraction, internal reflection is more uniform. I assume that the glass is frosted on only one side.

  11. very easy due to the smooth tape becomeing the surface the light passes thought the now not frosted glass !   

  12. All these suggestions are wrong, it's clearly the adhesive on the tape smoothing over the tiny imperfections in the frosted glass, allowing light to pass straight through and say the same thing that everyone else has already said because I haven't read their comments, making reading this a waste of time.

  13. All these suggestions are wrong, it’s clearly the adhesive on the tape smoothing over the tiny imperfections in the frosted glass, allowing light to pass straight through and say the same thing that everyone else has already said because I haven’t read their comments, making reading this a waste of time.

  14. now that that's been answered, the only question that remains is why light passes through glass in the first place

    • just about to finish a Physics Masters degree and i'm still unsure.  Some materials are just transparent to certain wavelengths.

      • Goes to prove that a physics doesn’t necessarily indicate intelligence level. Nothing to do with wavelengths. Pouring transparent liquid on the frosted glass would have the exact same effect. Most cheap frosted glasses work by having a porous texture on the surface, while the inside is just normal transparent glass.

      • Goes to prove that a physics doesn't necessarily indicate intelligence level. Nothing to do with wavelengths. Pouring transparent liquid on the frosted glass would have the exact same effect. Most cheap frosted glasses work by having a porous texture on the surface, while the inside is just normal transparent glass.

    • just about to finish a Physics Masters degree and i'm still unsure.  Some materials are just transparent to certain wavelengths.

  15. now that that’s been answered, the only question that remains is why light passes through glass in the first place

  16. Frosted glass is really just glass that has been scored by very fine sandpaper (in essence). The tape essentially fills in the gaps, restoring it to see-through glass again. It's kind of what we do when we apply vaseline to a scratched monitor to "remove" the scratch.

  17. Frosted glass is really just glass that has been scored by very fine sandpaper (in essence). The tape essentially fills in the gaps, restoring it to see-through glass again. It's kind of what we do when we apply vaseline to a scratched monitor to "remove" the scratch.

  18. Circumventing everyone who obviously didn't read the previous comments, I'm going to try to poke a hole in this whole "the glue from the tape fills in the pits in the glass" theory.

    When condensation builds up on a frosted window, if you blow on it or wipe it and allow the condensation to dribble, the glass also becomes transparent…

    and I just realized that it's the same effect.  So never mind the poking holes thing.

Leave a Reply

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.