Some Very Bad News for IBM and Apple

First the good news.

It’s the new Commodore 128PC. A computer breakthrough with all the power of its competition at half the price. The commodore 128PC has the same memory as the IBM PCJr or the Apple IIc. It has 80 column color capability. The IBM PCjr doesn’t. It’s expandable to 512K of memory. The Apple IIc isn’t. It’s the first personal computer to have more than 6000 software programs written for it even before it was introduced. Because it’s compatible with our all purpose computer: the Commodore 64, the world’s best selling computer.

The bad news for IBM and Apple is that the stranglehold they’ve had on the lucrative $4 billion personal computer market has finally been broken. The good news for retailers is that you can finally tap into that personal computer market. And while this is our first entry into the personal computer market, it won’t be our last. Which is good news for everybody but IBM and Apple.

80 column color capability? expandable to 512k of memory? 6000 software programs already written for it? I’m upgrading my C64 right now! But the ultimate question remains… will this thing run Crysis?

Advertisement





13 Responses to Some Very Bad News for IBM and Apple

  1. Ah, isn't nostalgia grand. I started out on a Commodore 64 and an Atari 800. The Commodore 128 was a good stepping stone.

    I lusted for the Amiga machines. Amigas were the first systems to have math co-processors, and separate multi-voice sound chips. They were lots of bang for the buck. I knew a guy that used to develop in C on his Amiga, and cross-compile to the PC. Commodore had a lot of potential.

    Unfortunately, it seems as if they couldn't ever get folks to take their systems seriously, or just didn't know how to market the things as other than curiosities or game systems. A shame, really. Imagine how different the landscape might have been if only…..

  2. Ah, isn’t nostalgia grand. I started out on a Commodore 64 and an Atari 800. The Commodore 128 was a good stepping stone.

    I lusted for the Amiga machines. Amigas were the first systems to have math co-processors, and separate multi-voice sound chips. They were lots of bang for the buck. I knew a guy that used to develop in C on his Amiga, and cross-compile to the PC. Commodore had a lot of potential.

    Unfortunately, it seems as if they couldn’t ever get folks to take their systems seriously, or just didn’t know how to market the things as other than curiosities or game systems. A shame, really. Imagine how different the landscape might have been if only…..

    • I had an Amiga 500 – great hardware. You could run a Mac Plus emulator on it that worked very well (albeit with interlaced video). The main issue at the time was the Amiga OS (Workbench I believe it was called); they took forever to update the OS when the newer Amigas came out, and it was pretty buggy from what I remember. Having separate hardware for sound and graphics (instead of the CPU having to handle it all) made a HUGE difference at the time; they had awesome sound and graphics (and overall performance) compared to the other systems out at the time.

  3. I loved my Commodore 128, though I don't ever remember it being referred to as a 128PC. The biggest problem with it is that its cp/m mode was just too slow to be particularly useful.

  4. I loved my Commodore 128, though I don’t ever remember it being referred to as a 128PC. The biggest problem with it is that its cp/m mode was just too slow to be particularly useful.

  5. *sets walker aside and puts teeth back in* I remember when that ad came out. I had thought that it would be great fun to have one of those with all of its RAM and color capability. But, the one that wooed me even more was the Apple Lisa with its 1MB of RAM!!!

  6. *sets walker aside and puts teeth back in* I remember when that ad came out. I had thought that it would be great fun to have one of those with all of its RAM and color capability. But, the one that wooed me even more was the Apple Lisa with its 1MB of RAM!!!

  7. This is a fantastic ad from the early days of computing. Still doesn't beat my all-time favorite ad in which Apple welcomes IBM to the world of personal computing.

  8. This is a fantastic ad from the early days of computing. Still doesn’t beat my all-time favorite ad in which Apple welcomes IBM to the world of personal computing.

  9. Boy, that brings back memories. My last PC from that era was an Atari 800XL with the ‘Black Box’ upgrade to allow use of IBM spec floppy drives – and I was just about to buy an ST, when I read a review in Consumer Reports calling it a ‘high-tech doorstop. So I held off. Then the company I work for purchased a computer controlled/programmed punch press – and it just so happened that the press was run by an Atari ST. Don’t think I’ve read a CR since then!

  10. Boy, that brings back memories. My last PC from that era was an Atari 800XL with the 'Black Box' upgrade to allow use of IBM spec floppy drives – and I was just about to buy an ST, when I read a review in Consumer Reports calling it a 'high-tech doorstop. So I held off. Then the company I work for purchased a computer controlled/programmed punch press – and it just so happened that the press was run by an Atari ST. Don't think I've read a CR since then!