Grand Theft Auto and violence: Your honest opinion

Before going any further, I want you guys to listen to the following video.

I personally think that we should not let young kids play these games, and that’s exactly why there is an age rating on them. But once someone is old enough to make the difference between “right” and “wrong” and that their sense of morality has properly matured, I don’t think a video game could really have an influence on the way they act in society. what do YOU think? Let us know in the comments section below.





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75 Responses to Grand Theft Auto and violence: Your honest opinion

  1. A few points…

    – Ever played a driving sim game only to have to put it on pause and make a dash to the store for some milk, a newspaper or such? The videogame does affect the style in which you drive down to that corner market! You'll be much more aggressive and lead-footed, I can all but guarantee. So in subtle ways too many to number, even non-violent videogames have an impact on peoples' behaviors.

    – Who gets to decide what age is appropriate to begin exposing children to gratuitous violence? Less than 5 years = too young, but 6 is okay? No? 8? 12? I'd say 18. Old enough to join the military = old enough to gun down people in videogames. But I'm sure that comment will have people thinking of me as some kind of extremist nutjob.

    – Videogames are not now what they once were. The bad guys are little green squiggly alien invaders any more. Instead, the people who you're out to gun down, beat up, or in some way kill, are ultra-realistic, breathing, bleeding human-like characters. They'll limp if you only graze 'em. They'll yell out in pain. For all intents, they're… people.

    – We have no tolerance for the idea of some terrorist gunning down people in the street – and rightly so – yet we're perfectly fine with children doing very similar horrific, mindless violent acts to videogame characters? Sure, there's some difference, but is there enough?

    – Seems funny to me that most of the same people who don't bat an eye at their kids playing these ultra-violent shoot-em-ups would stroke out if their "innocent" little kids cracked open a Playboy magazine. So, killing people violently is okay, but checking out women's breasts is pure evil? Where's the logic there? Somehow I believe I'd far prefer that my son oogle a naked woman than to blast another person's intestines out with a sawed-off shotgun…

    • "So in subtle ways too many to number, even non-violent videogames have an impact on peoples’ behaviors."

      – The same could be said for movies, comics, books etc. Did you drive fast after watching the Fast and the Furious?

      "We have no tolerance for the idea of some terrorist gunning down people in the street – and rightly so – yet we’re perfectly fine with children doing very similar horrific, mindless violent acts to videogame characters?"

      – Firstly, pretending to do something is not even on the same realm as somebody actually doing it.

      And I think the whole point of this is to say that games like this are *not* suitable for children. Full stop. Same way as a movie like Hostel wouldn't be suitable for children.

      That's why we have ratings systems in place.

      But as an adult, I would like to have the choice to make up my own mind to buy it or not.

    • Hi Rob,
      I agree with you 100%, The games of today involve to much killing, way to much violence and like you said is not little martians anymore. They look like real people,real guns,blood and guts. It is ok to gun down anyone. Like you I would rather see my son looking @ some naked woman in a magazine than teach him that is okay and fun to kill people.

    • total nudity at an appropriate age is acceptable. Graphic sex scenes should be reserved for those old enough to understand it without being an instructional experience. Why ruin something beautiful before they even know what it is?
      Violence? Read the book "Ender's War". Having kids play these violent games is just like training them to go do the actual thing. Subjecting young people to violence or sex de-sensitises them to it. Playing those games trains their minds and muslces to work together and react autmoatically in those situations. Period.

  2. <blockquote cite="TLP">Playing GTA does not make you kill people.

    Perhaps, but a child carrying a handgun to school doesn't necessarily mean anyone's gonna get hurt either. Guns don't kill people.

    Comfy with that?

    • In Australia, our gun laws prohibit owning a firearm of any kind without a licence, and self defence is not considered a valid reason for a licence.

      The murder rate is a lot lower here.

      If "No gun for self defense = lower murder rate" doesn't make sense, you'd have to look at how many US shootings were made with guns that are carried for "self defense".

      • i agree with djhayman. My country (Japan) is not allowed to have any firearms what so ever. it is completely illegal to own a gun. cops here don't even use their guns here! the law is that you never shoot in any circumstance unless it is absolutely necessary. they only have 1 bullet in the gun too.

      • if somebody wants to kill somebody, they dont have to have a gun to do it. A gun just makes it faster and easier. People have been killing people since a long time before guns came along. Take guns away and they'll use rocks, sticks or their own bare hands if necessary. But if someone comes at ME with the intention of hurting me or mine, I am going to use MY gun to make sure he doesn't. Carrying a gun is a lot easier than trying to carry a cop, and it won't take 10 minutes or more for it to get there, either. Gun control is hitting what you aim at. The first step to confiscating weapons is to register them, then all they have to do is show up and take them away.

  3. The thing is, for a very, very small minority, things like excessive or glamourous violence in films, video games, television, graphic novels, even music, can and does inevitably have an effect. One can easily observe this on young children – let them watch a ninja film, and they'll be jumping around fighting and scratching in no time.

    Hence, for an adult who is emotionally or mentally immature, it is not too much of a leap to believe that people in this area can equally be affected by similar events.

    However, and this is the key part – just because a VERY small percentage of people *might* be influenced by something like GTA IV or The Matrix or Natural Born Killers or Sin City – or even the news on the TV, or a documentary – to go on to a copycat event or something vaguely related, does not mean everybody else should be handled with kid-gloves by the government/media watchdogs and be 'punished' as a result.

    As you say, it's common sense that the certification program in movies and games (etc) should be used as it is there for a reason. While I'm not sure things like nudity do any 'harm' to children at all – actively keeping them away from it is probably more detrimental to their long-term mental health as it risk making the nude human body and sex seem 'dirty' – I've seen with my own eyes the immediate impact a very violent scene from a movie (certainly if it in any way glitzy) can have on young children. By all means do what we can to limit their exposure to that.

    However, the rest of us are adults. We make millions of choices in our lives where we decided what is right or wrong, what is safe and what is dangerous. For most of us – probably 99.99 per cent – watching a film or playing a video game is just simple escapism, and that's it. Do we fantasise, perhaps, about the content? Inevitably. Fantasies are a healthy part of the adult mind, and a big reason why that is true is because for a mature adult most fantasies remain that way. They never become realities.

    As above, simply because that 0.01 per cent might take it further is not reason enough for everybody else to bow down to the Nanny State.

  4. The thing is, for a very, very small minority, things like excessive or glamourous violence in films, video games, television, graphic novels, even music, can and does inevitably have an effect. One can easily observe this on young children – let them watch a ninja film, and they’ll be jumping around fighting and scratching in no time.

    Hence, for an adult who is emotionally or mentally immature, it is not too much of a leap to believe that people in this area can equally be affected by similar events.

    However, and this is the key part – just because a VERY small percentage of people *might* be influenced by something like GTA IV or The Matrix or Natural Born Killers or Sin City – or even the news on the TV, or a documentary – to go on to a copycat event or something vaguely related, does not mean everybody else should be handled with kid-gloves by the government/media watchdogs and be ‘punished’ as a result.

    As you say, it’s common sense that the certification program in movies and games (etc) should be used as it is there for a reason. While I’m not sure things like nudity do any ‘harm’ to children at all – actively keeping them away from it is probably more detrimental to their long-term mental health as it risk making the nude human body and sex seem ‘dirty’ – I’ve seen with my own eyes the immediate impact a very violent scene from a movie (certainly if it in any way glitzy) can have on young children. By all means do what we can to limit their exposure to that.

    However, the rest of us are adults. We make millions of choices in our lives where we decided what is right or wrong, what is safe and what is dangerous. For most of us – probably 99.99 per cent – watching a film or playing a video game is just simple escapism, and that’s it. Do we fantasise, perhaps, about the content? Inevitably. Fantasies are a healthy part of the adult mind, and a big reason why that is true is because for a mature adult most fantasies remain that way. They never become realities.

    As above, simply because that 0.01 per cent might take it further is not reason enough for everybody else to bow down to the Nanny State.

  5. People should have the liberty to buy any product they want as long as they don't hurt other people with it.

    Playing GTA does not make you kill people…

  6. People should have the liberty to buy any product they want as long as they don’t hurt other people with it.

    Playing GTA does not make you kill people…

  7. A few points…

    – Ever played a driving sim game only to have to put it on pause and make a dash to the store for some milk, a newspaper or such? The videogame does affect the style in which you drive down to that corner market! You’ll be much more aggressive and lead-footed, I can all but guarantee. So in subtle ways too many to number, even non-violent videogames have an impact on peoples’ behaviors.

    – Who gets to decide what age is appropriate to begin exposing children to gratuitous violence? Less than 5 years = too young, but 6 is okay? No? 8? 12? I’d say 18. Old enough to join the military = old enough to gun down people in videogames. But I’m sure that comment will have people thinking of me as some kind of extremist nutjob.

    – Videogames are not now what they once were. The bad guys are little green squiggly alien invaders any more. Instead, the people who you’re out to gun down, beat up, or in some way kill, are ultra-realistic, breathing, bleeding human-like characters. They’ll limp if you only graze ’em. They’ll yell out in pain. For all intents, they’re… people.

    – We have no tolerance for the idea of some terrorist gunning down people in the street – and rightly so – yet we’re perfectly fine with children doing very similar horrific, mindless violent acts to videogame characters? Sure, there’s some difference, but is there enough?

    – Seems funny to me that most of the same people who don’t bat an eye at their kids playing these ultra-violent shoot-em-ups would stroke out if their “innocent” little kids cracked open a Playboy magazine. So, killing people violently is okay, but checking out women’s breasts is pure evil? Where’s the logic there? Somehow I believe I’d far prefer that my son oogle a naked woman than to blast another person’s intestines out with a sawed-off shotgun…

    • “So in subtle ways too many to number, even non-violent videogames have an impact on peoples’ behaviors.”

      – The same could be said for movies, comics, books etc. Did you drive fast after watching the Fast and the Furious?

      “We have no tolerance for the idea of some terrorist gunning down people in the street – and rightly so – yet we’re perfectly fine with children doing very similar horrific, mindless violent acts to videogame characters?”

      – Firstly, pretending to do something is not even on the same realm as somebody actually doing it.

      And I think the whole point of this is to say that games like this are *not* suitable for children. Full stop. Same way as a movie like Hostel wouldn’t be suitable for children.

      That’s why we have ratings systems in place.

      But as an adult, I would like to have the choice to make up my own mind to buy it or not.

  8. Playing GTA does not make you kill people.

    Perhaps, but a child carrying a handgun to school doesn’t necessarily mean anyone’s gonna get hurt either. Guns don’t kill people.

    Comfy with that?

    • In Australia, our gun laws prohibit owning a firearm of any kind without a licence, and self defence is not considered a valid reason for a licence.

      The murder rate is a lot lower here.

      If “No gun for self defense = lower murder rate” doesn’t make sense, you’d have to look at how many US shootings were made with guns that are carried for “self defense”.

  9. <q cite="">Ever played a driving sim game only to have to put it on pause and make a dash to the store for some milk, a newspaper or such? The videogame does affect the style in which you drive down to that corner market! You’ll be much more aggressive and lead-footed, I can all but guarantee. So in subtle ways too many to number, even non-violent videogames have an impact on peoples’ behaviors.</q>

    Bullshit, you may feel inclined to drive faster, but if you're remotely intelligent you won't. Also, it's true that if you for example let kids play fighting games they might fight with each other afterwards, but this behavior quickly goes away again, short-term impacts on people's behavior is very different from long-term impacts, a fact that a lot of people don't seem to think that much about.

  10. I was playing Wipeout 2097, ten years ago, and oddly enough I never had the idea of speeding, driving like a maniac.

    Similarly, I played GTAIII years ago and I still haven't shot anybody or anything of the kind.

    My conclusion : video games don't make people violent or deviant. It is just a question of age and maturity.

    A maniac will take everything to excuse or explain his behaviour.

    So yes to the rating and the interdiction of selling them underage.

  11. Ever played a driving sim game only to have to put it on pause and make a dash to the store for some milk, a newspaper or such? The videogame does affect the style in which you drive down to that corner market! You’ll be much more aggressive and lead-footed, I can all but guarantee. So in subtle ways too many to number, even non-violent videogames have an impact on peoples’ behaviors.

    Bullshit, you may feel inclined to drive faster, but if you’re remotely intelligent you won’t. Also, it’s true that if you for example let kids play fighting games they might fight with each other afterwards, but this behavior quickly goes away again, short-term impacts on people’s behavior is very different from long-term impacts, a fact that a lot of people don’t seem to think that much about.

  12. I was playing Wipeout 2097, ten years ago, and oddly enough I never had the idea of speeding, driving like a maniac.

    Similarly, I played GTAIII years ago and I still haven’t shot anybody or anything of the kind.

    My conclusion : video games don’t make people violent or deviant. It is just a question of age and maturity.

    A maniac will take everything to excuse or explain his behaviour.

    So yes to the rating and the interdiction of selling them underage.

  13. I just think that if video games that contain violence caused violence, then from the 1990's to today we should see a massive rise in violent crime. Why is it that we see a massive REDUCTION in violent crime for this time period?

    The correlation is just stupid political pandering IMHO.

  14. I just think that if video games that contain violence caused violence, then from the 1990’s to today we should see a massive rise in violent crime. Why is it that we see a massive REDUCTION in violent crime for this time period?

    The correlation is just stupid political pandering IMHO.

  15. I think the rating system is necessary. It also need some reform too. A game can't be AO or it'll never enter some countries or appear on most shelves, but the M rating is considered by many to be a harmless rating (hence harmless game).

    Rock Star is not a company of naive developers and designers and they know they're pushing the limits of gaming. So, if they push then the rating system should enforce.

    Honestly, I'd be the first to defend violent video games, but virtual strip clubs, sex, and killing has to make you use some subjective reasoning.

  16. Honestly? I've found myself driving too agressively after an extended play session of GTA4. I recognized the behavior, and accounted for it, thus is hasn't happened again. But someone less mature or more impulsive might have trouble (being purely speculative here).

    All in all, I'm NOT a fan of kids playing games like GTA. Just like I'm not a fan of them seeing R rated films, or reading adult literature (not talking porn, but literature with intense descriptions of adult themes in general). I view video games exactly like I do all other input into kids' lives.

    I tend to agree that 18 is a good age to lift parental restrictions. Once they're off to college (or the equivalent) they've been instilled with whatever you're going to provide and they'll be making their own decisions. Hopefully they ask for advice when they face something questionable, but it's really up to them from that point on.

  17. I think the rating system is necessary. It also need some reform too. A game can’t be AO or it’ll never enter some countries or appear on most shelves, but the M rating is considered by many to be a harmless rating (hence harmless game).

    Rock Star is not a company of naive developers and designers and they know they’re pushing the limits of gaming. So, if they push then the rating system should enforce.

    Honestly, I’d be the first to defend violent video games, but virtual strip clubs, sex, and killing has to make you use some subjective reasoning.

  18. I think the rating system is necessary. It also need some reform too. A game can’t be AO or it’ll never enter some countries or appear on most shelves, but the M rating is considered by many to be a harmless rating (hence harmless game).

    Rock Star is not a company of naive developers and designers and they know they’re pushing the limits of gaming. So, if they push then the rating system should enforce.

    Honestly, I’d be the first to defend violent video games, but virtual strip clubs, sex, and killing has to make you use some subjective reasoning.

  19. Honestly? I’ve found myself driving too agressively after an extended play session of GTA4. I recognized the behavior, and accounted for it, thus is hasn’t happened again. But someone less mature or more impulsive might have trouble (being purely speculative here).

    All in all, I’m NOT a fan of kids playing games like GTA. Just like I’m not a fan of them seeing R rated films, or reading adult literature (not talking porn, but literature with intense descriptions of adult themes in general). I view video games exactly like I do all other input into kids’ lives.

    I tend to agree that 18 is a good age to lift parental restrictions. Once they’re off to college (or the equivalent) they’ve been instilled with whatever you’re going to provide and they’ll be making their own decisions. Hopefully they ask for advice when they face something questionable, but it’s really up to them from that point on.

  20. I'm somewhere in the middle here.

    Do I like and approve of the GTA series? No.

    Do I think GTA affects people like this? I doubt it to the extent that it's blown up to seem. Certainly, everything we see, hear, or do affects us in some way, positive or negative, to some extent.

    Do I think that GTAIV is going to facilitate a whole new generation of murderers and rapists? No, but on the same token I can't imagine any positive effect GTA would have on people.

    • "I can’t imagine any positive effect GTA would have on people"…

      seriously? you can't sit down for a few minutes and think hard and find at least one small, teensie thing about a video game that would have a positive spin in someone's life?

      how about enjoyment? at the very least…

      but, since this is a topic about the impact of violence in video games, let's focus on that.

      has anyone you have known in your life ever made a similar statement: "i was a little upset about work so i headed to the gym to blow off some steam before i went home." never heard anything like that?…

      seriously?

      c'mon, dude. you know you have. and that is a very accurate example of someone using a distraction of non-violent aggression to get rid of some bad thoughts or memories of their day.

      video games are entertainment, plain and simple. just like movies, television, books, radio, music, internet sites, chatting and texting, phone calls, and even talking to yourself. ALL of those things have an impact on the way people act or how they view the world around them. not just video games.

      and saying things like "i was playing GTA and then ran to the store and noticed i was driving little more aggressive than i normally do" and BLAMING it on the video game is a total and utter cop-out. the PROBLEM is that you FORGOT you were in the real world. not that GTA told you to do it. YOU are the problem, not the media or the influence.

      and for those worried that some people might not be able to differentiate, well… THOSE people are very few in the world. and, that factor has NOTHING to do with AGE. look at actors and actresses. do THEY have issues keeping their work separate? do we hear about Bruce Willis constantly trying to be a cop or fighting terrorists? Does George Clooney have a secret life of a Master Thief? Are Paul Walker and Vin Diesel constantly pulled over for street racing?

      the answer is obviously a big "NO! THEY DON'T !!" and there is a reason for it. they can separate their life from their work, and trust me on this, it's a little more "in your face" than a video game.

      i am sick of hearing about this really stupid debate. it's not even a "debate" because there IS NOTHING TO DEBATE. violence has been in the human realm since we took OUR FIRST OXYGEN FILLED BREATH. it's just really really silly to sit back and BLAME other things. it's in our nature, folks. read a history book.

      there are a TON of things you can do in that game. not ALL of them are VIOLENTLY AGGRESSIVE, which is the action we are looking for. and, yes, there is a difference between violence and aggression. don't agree? well, you're wrong, so sit down…

      for instance, in the game i can get to the top of a building and if i so choose i can walk off the edge. it's pretty fun watching it happen. it's also fun to walk your character out into the street and let him get wasted by a truck and watch him "ragdoll" all over the place.

      but, am i going to do that for real? hell no! this same mentality holds true with everything else in the game. am i suddenly going to go out and jack someone's car? no. why the hell would i?! what the hell am i going to do with someone else's car? i can't park it at my house. i have no idea where the closest chop-shop is or who i could sell it to. it's just stupid to think that a VIDEO GAME could ever even remotely change the way my life is.

      bottom line, video games, and ALL other forms of entertainment, are a release from reality. nothing more. those people who cannot differentiate reality from imaginary are the REAL PROBLEM. not the video games or television or movies or books or playboy or howard stern or whatever else you think has impact.

      they don't. the ONLY thing that can make you do something is YOURSELF. no matter what you think otherwise, THIS is TRUTH. there is no such thing as "he made me do it". none.

      so, in short, video games actually HELP people get out their aggressions from life (and believe me, there are way more grossly-inhumane things being done in our everyday "life" that make me sick to even think about and know that all of you think it's A-Okay) and allow us some form of enjoyment to help us cope with…

      ah, f* this… NO! i am sick of justifying this to idiots who think this way.

      if i want to play a game or read a book, who the F* are YOU to tell me i can't. no MATTER what age i am, keep your f* opinion where it belongs, which is OUT OF MY LIFE !!

      • Hey Gary, let's keep this discussion civil please :)

        I enjoyed your comment though! I guess it serves as a proof that many things can help people blow off a bit of steam eh? :)

        • true, civility is underrated.

          however, i feel that an attack on the entertainment i enjoy to be uncivil. also, i feel that classifying various things by age or race or creed or anything like that is also uncivil.

          when people stop trying to take away freedoms from people, then we will all be truly civil.

          yeah, i got a littel emotional there near the end, huh? lol

          too bad i can't play GTA at work to blow off steam. i guess i'll just have to drive like a maniac and then go home and beat my wife instead…

          nah, i'll just wait until i get home.

          Don't forget to PICK UP YOUR TRASH !!

  21. I’m somewhere in the middle here.
    Do I like and approve of the GTA series? No.

    Do I think GTA affects people like this? I doubt it to the extent that it’s blown up to seem. Certainly, everything we see, hear, or do affects us in some way, positive or negative, to some extent.

    Do I think that GTAIV is going to facilitate a whole new generation of murderers and rapists? No, but on the same token I can’t imagine any positive effect GTA would have on people.

    • “I can’t imagine any positive effect GTA would have on people”…

      seriously? you can’t sit down for a few minutes and think hard and find at least one small, teensie thing about a video game that would have a positive spin in someone’s life?

      how about enjoyment? at the very least…

      but, since this is a topic about the impact of violence in video games, let’s focus on that.

      has anyone you have known in your life ever made a similar statement: “i was a little upset about work so i headed to the gym to blow off some steam before i went home.” never heard anything like that?…

      seriously?

      c’mon, dude. you know you have. and that is a very accurate example of someone using a distraction of non-violent aggression to get rid of some bad thoughts or memories of their day.

      video games are entertainment, plain and simple. just like movies, television, books, radio, music, internet sites, chatting and texting, phone calls, and even talking to yourself. ALL of those things have an impact on the way people act or how they view the world around them. not just video games.

      and saying things like “i was playing GTA and then ran to the store and noticed i was driving little more aggressive than i normally do” and BLAMING it on the video game is a total and utter cop-out. the PROBLEM is that you FORGOT you were in the real world. not that GTA told you to do it. YOU are the problem, not the media or the influence.

      and for those worried that some people might not be able to differentiate, well… THOSE people are very few in the world. and, that factor has NOTHING to do with AGE. look at actors and actresses. do THEY have issues keeping their work separate? do we hear about Bruce Willis constantly trying to be a cop or fighting terrorists? Does George Clooney have a secret life of a Master Thief? Are Paul Walker and Vin Diesel constantly pulled over for street racing?

      the answer is obviously a big “NO! THEY DON’T !!” and there is a reason for it. they can separate their life from their work, and trust me on this, it’s a little more “in your face” than a video game.

      i am sick of hearing about this really stupid debate. it’s not even a “debate” because there IS NOTHING TO DEBATE. violence has been in the human realm since we took OUR FIRST OXYGEN FILLED BREATH. it’s just really really silly to sit back and BLAME other things. it’s in our nature, folks. read a history book.

      there are a TON of things you can do in that game. not ALL of them are VIOLENTLY AGGRESSIVE, which is the action we are looking for. and, yes, there is a difference between violence and aggression. don’t agree? well, you’re wrong, so sit down…

      for instance, in the game i can get to the top of a building and if i so choose i can walk off the edge. it’s pretty fun watching it happen. it’s also fun to walk your character out into the street and let him get wasted by a truck and watch him “ragdoll” all over the place.

      but, am i going to do that for real? hell no! this same mentality holds true with everything else in the game. am i suddenly going to go out and jack someone’s car? no. why the hell would i?! what the hell am i going to do with someone else’s car? i can’t park it at my house. i have no idea where the closest chop-shop is or who i could sell it to. it’s just stupid to think that a VIDEO GAME could ever even remotely change the way my life is.

      bottom line, video games, and ALL other forms of entertainment, are a release from reality. nothing more. those people who cannot differentiate reality from imaginary are the REAL PROBLEM. not the video games or television or movies or books or playboy or howard stern or whatever else you think has impact.

      they don’t. the ONLY thing that can make you do something is YOURSELF. no matter what you think otherwise, THIS is TRUTH. there is no such thing as “he made me do it”. none.

      so, in short, video games actually HELP people get out their aggressions from life (and believe me, there are way more grossly-inhumane things being done in our everyday “life” that make me sick to even think about and know that all of you think it’s A-Okay) and allow us some form of enjoyment to help us cope with…

      ah, f* this… NO! i am sick of justifying this to idiots who think this way.

      if i want to play a game or read a book, who the F* are YOU to tell me i can’t. no MATTER what age i am, keep your f* opinion where it belongs, which is OUT OF MY LIFE !!

      • Hey Gary, let’s keep this discussion civil please :)

        I enjoyed your comment though! I guess it serves as a proof that many things can help people blow off a bit of steam eh? :)

        • true, civility is underrated.

          however, i feel that an attack on the entertainment i enjoy to be uncivil. also, i feel that classifying various things by age or race or creed or anything like that is also uncivil.

          when people stop trying to take away freedoms from people, then we will all be truly civil.

          yeah, i got a littel emotional there near the end, huh? lol

          too bad i can’t play GTA at work to blow off steam. i guess i’ll just have to drive like a maniac and then go home and beat my wife instead…

          nah, i’ll just wait until i get home.

          Don’t forget to PICK UP YOUR TRASH !!

  22. I think you only have to look at the last GTA to see how out of proportion the whole subject is.

    Example: in the US, it had a 17+ rating.

    Once the Hot Coffee mod came out and you could see boobs, everybody was up in arms. And guess what… The rating was changed to 18+!!!

    So, if your 17 it's ok to virtually gun down people, as long as there aren't any tits involved. Hell, you can even physically engage in sex acts, but you have to be a year older to *virtually* engage in sex acts.

    The whole thing is just stupid.

    Look at each new game, decide on an age rating, and be happy with it. Seeing fuzzy pixelated tits in a game should be far less of an interesting topic than willful murder. Especially when you can turn around and actually engage in those sex acts in real life.

    And concerned parents: if you don't want your kids playing these games, don't let them! That's called parenting!

  23. I think you only have to look at the last GTA to see how out of proportion the whole subject is.

    Example: in the US, it had a 17+ rating.

    Once the Hot Coffee mod came out and you could see boobs, everybody was up in arms. And guess what… The rating was changed to 18+!!!

    So, if your 17 it’s ok to virtually gun down people, as long as there aren’t any tits involved. Hell, you can even physically engage in sex acts, but you have to be a year older to *virtually* engage in sex acts.

    The whole thing is just stupid.

    Look at each new game, decide on an age rating, and be happy with it. Seeing fuzzy pixelated tits in a game should be far less of an interesting topic than willful murder. Especially when you can turn around and actually engage in those sex acts in real life.

    And concerned parents: if you don’t want your kids playing these games, don’t let them! That’s called parenting!

  24. I have been playing video games since I was 4 years old. 20 years later, and I´ve never so much as laid a hand on someone. I think it´s ironic that this man is disguisted with the violence of the video game, and yet spousal and child abuse wasn´t mentioned as being more influential on children to become violent themselves. He´s probably mad because he couldn´t get past the first mission of GTA IV. :-) GTA IV doesn´t kill people, people kill people.

  25. I have been playing video games since I was 4 years old. 20 years later, and I´ve never so much as laid a hand on someone. I think it´s ironic that this man is disguisted with the violence of the video game, and yet spousal and child abuse wasn´t mentioned as being more influential on children to become violent themselves. He´s probably mad because he couldn´t get past the first mission of GTA IV. :-) GTA IV doesn´t kill people, people kill people.

  26. Pingback: Grand Theft Auto and it’s violence « Traxx: Site Blog

  27. you're dumb..it's a game.. lol i play it but i would never think about even pointing a gun at someone

  28. you’re dumb..it’s a game.. lol i play it but i would never think about even pointing a gun at someone

  29. It's a game. Period.

    If somebody does act up, and I'm sure that somebody will, they may even claim that the game gave them the idea, but I think you'll find that even without the game they would have done something just as bad. Yes, that's a mutilated sentence.

  30. It’s a game. Period.

    If somebody does act up, and I’m sure that somebody will, they may even claim that the game gave them the idea, but I think you’ll find that even without the game they would have done something just as bad. Yes, that’s a mutilated sentence.

  31. I still prefer to see people live it out playing than actually going after and trying it in real life.

    The game is just a game, and with that it means you can try it out; to live "play/pretend" to be something you aren't, in this case a thug killing people etc, which is taboo and something forbidden in real life.

    In my opinion it's good that theese games excist, and there is a age limit set on the game, if parents let their young kids play this, kids that yet don't know right from wrong, then that's their own stupid mistake.

    As with the military thing, in sweden we were shown pictures/movies of people hurt in action, and told this is you if you don't pull the trigger.

    No need to play, just show the concequenses of what happens if you don't. Will make the hardest pacifict pull the trigger after seeing that.

  32. I still prefer to see people live it out playing than actually going after and trying it in real life.

    The game is just a game, and with that it means you can try it out; to live “play/pretend” to be something you aren’t, in this case a thug killing people etc, which is taboo and something forbidden in real life.

    In my opinion it’s good that theese games excist, and there is a age limit set on the game, if parents let their young kids play this, kids that yet don’t know right from wrong, then that’s their own stupid mistake.

    As with the military thing, in sweden we were shown pictures/movies of people hurt in action, and told this is you if you don’t pull the trigger.
    No need to play, just show the concequenses of what happens if you don’t. Will make the hardest pacifict pull the trigger after seeing that.

  33. Thing is, Marcus, many (most?) parents have checked out – they're on autopilot. They don't care, can't be bothered to get involved, or simply don't think enough about this to make a sensible judgement. How else do you explain 5 & 6 year old kids playing these types of violent games?

    I know several guys at work who take great pride in the fact that their very young boys excel at PC-based shooters right along side them. They think nothing of the implications of a elementary-school-age child ruthlessly gunning down enemy soldiers in Call of Duty.

    I suspect that there's no proof of violent video games having long-term effects on teenagers because nobody has figured out how – or bothered – try to get a metric on this. There's no denying that kids today are far more desensitized to graphic violence than any generation before. Videogames must play a part in that.

    • Well, that's a problem, but I still don't think the government should control whether or not parents let their kids play violent video games, watch violent movies, etc.

      Also, there's been made a lot of studies concerning the effect of violent video games. Of course kids are more desensitized to graphic violence, that is an inevitable side-effect of the technological development the last 50-100 years or so (movies, tv, internet, video games, etc), but that doesn't mean that kids have more violent tendencies now. Actually, today, the risk of kids getting into crime and violence is a lot bigger if they do not play video games, because playing video games is a part of being socially accepted amongst people your same age.

    • so, wait. a "parent can't be bothered to get involved" and suddenly the people who did bother to get involved have to deal with retarded laws geared to "save the children"????!!????

      no. no. and finally… no.

      "they think nothing of the implications of a elementary-school-age child ruthlessly gunning down enemy soldiers in CoD."

      ruthlessly? why such a vulgar description for placing my left hand on the keyboard and my right hand on the mouse while looking at a CRT/LCD screen with colored pixels and 3D polygons? ruthlessly… i love it! great attempt!

      do you think it is fair that those parents who have tuned-out are causing our government (which includes, me and you through taxes and lack of attention on IMPORTANT issues) HUGE amounts of money and time in order to parent your children? no offense here, but if you DO think it is fair to steal money from taxpayers then i think it is YOU who should lose their freedoms and not me.

      furthermore, if i CHOOSE to TEACH my children the differences between MEDIA and REAL LIFE (i would like to swerve from the topic slightly to point out my use of the word "media" instead of video games. why, Gary? well, because this discussion goes way beyond video games. games of the VIDEO persuasion are NOT THE ONLY GAMES THAT AFFECT people.) then i don't see how YOU or ANYONE ELSE should have ANY say in that what-so-ever.

      ya know, i was thinking about this over the weekend: this topic is so beneath us as human beings. there are WAY better efforts to put your hearts into besides whether or not some 13 year old is enjoying his or her FREE TIME playing an interactive story in the comfort of their own home or in the company of friends…

      i happened to catch "Varsity Blues" over the weekend. yeah yeah, i know. whatever. now that movie was about the children and the love of the pure game of football vs. the institution of Football and how it played into every part of life in that small town. stores selling alcohol to MINORS, lack of legal discipline for star players, the whole "you own this town" mentality, drug abuse, grade fixing, children being HELD BACK a grade or two so they'd have an ADVANTAGE in the sport…

      these were all events that took place with the acceptance of the local adult population or actually forced upon the children against their will (or they were mentally abused until coerced into performing the act) by those parents and adults.

      sure, this was a movie. and thankfully i am able to tell the difference between that and reality. however, this was a HOLLYWOOD movie, so it's not like they came up with these ideas on their own. no, they were influenced from situations in REAL LIFE. so, maybe it doesn't happen as bad as in "Varsity Blues", but it DOES happen.

      so, do YOU think it is okay for coaches and parents and law enforcement around the country to act like that over a game? why not ban football for kids under 18?

      i am dead f'n serious here. if YOU want to ban something i enjoy, OR make it harder for people to play or make a career out of, OR even try to tell me how to raise my kids, then I will find fault in something else that other people say is A-Okay. (read my other post above)

      the point of this whole discussion is STOP TELLING ME what to do! just STOP. go do your own thing and i'll do mine. if we happen to cross paths in that time, i will do my best to not interrupt yours and i hope you treat me with the same respect. if not, well, that is a different issue that you can't avoid or prepare for.

      just like football, video games are both a release from normal everyday life, an inspiration for creativity, intelligence, and artistry, they are a way to show off natural or disciplined skills, a great motivator and reward system, an outlet for behavior outside of work or other social environs, and a heck of a lot of fun.

      and, just like football, video games are a potential for anger, violence, abuse, and other "evils".

      my argument in this is so that people will STOP pinpointing video games as the ONLY negative influence in a kid's life. it is NOT, and i wish people would recognize that.

      sports, religion, government, glee club, a date, a classroom, the sidewalk, dinner, the subway… these are ALL areas that have potential to both enlighten and influence. we need to stop focusing on the negative.

      if not, then we should outlaw organized religion…

      THE number one KILLER of humans of all time by a WIDE margin.

      should we outlaw that?

      please, please, please recognize these things before you pigeonhole video games as some devil-made evil.

      and don't forget to PICK UP YOUR TRASH !!

    • So wait. "many parents have checked out" … so it's a videogame's fault that these parents aren't bothering to take an interest in their own kids?

      If a videogame causes someone to do something stupid because their parents never taught them it wasn't real… that's the parents' fault, not the game's.

  34. I believe that games of this stature and nature should be deemed as cigarettes, alcohol or even pornography. Not only do you need to be 18 years of age to purchase but to posses as well.

    Any parents found allowing their children to play, view or otherwise interact with things of such content should be subjected to fines or misdemeanor charges. How will they catch them? Their children will do it for them, children cant shut their mouths about anything, just visit any fast food chain or local coffee bar.

    Teachers, other parents and friends who are in the position to care about what is what will do something.

    If they don't it wont matter what games they are playing because soon (20-25 years) the world may very well be just like these GTA games.

    • I think that's pretty extreme, there is no proof of violent video games having long term effects on teenagers. Of course there should be an age limit, but in my opinion 18 is too high. And even with the age limit, it should still be up to the individual parents to decide whether or not their kid should play it.

  35. I believe that games of this stature and nature should be deemed as cigarettes, alcohol or even pornography. Not only do you need to be 18 years of age to purchase but to posses as well.
    Any parents found allowing their children to play, view or otherwise interact with things of such content should be subjected to fines or misdemeanor charges. How will they catch them? Their children will do it for them, children cant shut their mouths about anything, just visit any fast food chain or local coffee bar.
    Teachers, other parents and friends who are in the position to care about what is what will do something.
    If they don’t it wont matter what games they are playing because soon (20-25 years) the world may very well be just like these GTA games.

    • I think that’s pretty extreme, there is no proof of violent video games having long term effects on teenagers. Of course there should be an age limit, but in my opinion 18 is too high. And even with the age limit, it should still be up to the individual parents to decide whether or not their kid should play it.

  36. Thing is, Marcus, many (most?) parents have checked out – they’re on autopilot. They don’t care, can’t be bothered to get involved, or simply don’t think enough about this to make a sensible judgement. How else do you explain 5 & 6 year old kids playing these types of violent games?

    I know several guys at work who take great pride in the fact that their very young boys excel at PC-based shooters right along side them. They think nothing of the implications of a elementary-school-age child ruthlessly gunning down enemy soldiers in Call of Duty.

    I suspect that there’s no proof of violent video games having long-term effects on teenagers because nobody has figured out how – or bothered – try to get a metric on this. There’s no denying that kids today are far more desensitized to graphic violence than any generation before. Videogames must play a part in that.

    • Well, that’s a problem, but I still don’t think the government should control whether or not parents let their kids play violent video games, watch violent movies, etc.

      Also, there’s been made a lot of studies concerning the effect of violent video games. Of course kids are more desensitized to graphic violence, that is an inevitable side-effect of the technological development the last 50-100 years or so (movies, tv, internet, video games, etc), but that doesn’t mean that kids have more violent tendencies now. Actually, today, the risk of kids getting into crime and violence is a lot bigger if they do not play video games, because playing video games is a part of being socially accepted amongst people your same age.

    • so, wait. a “parent can’t be bothered to get involved” and suddenly the people who did bother to get involved have to deal with retarded laws geared to “save the children”????!!????

      no. no. and finally… no.

      “they think nothing of the implications of a elementary-school-age child ruthlessly gunning down enemy soldiers in CoD.”

      ruthlessly? why such a vulgar description for placing my left hand on the keyboard and my right hand on the mouse while looking at a CRT/LCD screen with colored pixels and 3D polygons? ruthlessly… i love it! great attempt!

      do you think it is fair that those parents who have tuned-out are causing our government (which includes, me and you through taxes and lack of attention on IMPORTANT issues) HUGE amounts of money and time in order to parent your children? no offense here, but if you DO think it is fair to steal money from taxpayers then i think it is YOU who should lose their freedoms and not me.

      furthermore, if i CHOOSE to TEACH my children the differences between MEDIA and REAL LIFE (i would like to swerve from the topic slightly to point out my use of the word “media” instead of video games. why, Gary? well, because this discussion goes way beyond video games. games of the VIDEO persuasion are NOT THE ONLY GAMES THAT AFFECT people.) then i don’t see how YOU or ANYONE ELSE should have ANY say in that what-so-ever.

      ya know, i was thinking about this over the weekend: this topic is so beneath us as human beings. there are WAY better efforts to put your hearts into besides whether or not some 13 year old is enjoying his or her FREE TIME playing an interactive story in the comfort of their own home or in the company of friends…

      i happened to catch “Varsity Blues” over the weekend. yeah yeah, i know. whatever. now that movie was about the children and the love of the pure game of football vs. the institution of Football and how it played into every part of life in that small town. stores selling alcohol to MINORS, lack of legal discipline for star players, the whole “you own this town” mentality, drug abuse, grade fixing, children being HELD BACK a grade or two so they’d have an ADVANTAGE in the sport…

      these were all events that took place with the acceptance of the local adult population or actually forced upon the children against their will (or they were mentally abused until coerced into performing the act) by those parents and adults.

      sure, this was a movie. and thankfully i am able to tell the difference between that and reality. however, this was a HOLLYWOOD movie, so it’s not like they came up with these ideas on their own. no, they were influenced from situations in REAL LIFE. so, maybe it doesn’t happen as bad as in “Varsity Blues”, but it DOES happen.

      so, do YOU think it is okay for coaches and parents and law enforcement around the country to act like that over a game? why not ban football for kids under 18?

      i am dead f’n serious here. if YOU want to ban something i enjoy, OR make it harder for people to play or make a career out of, OR even try to tell me how to raise my kids, then I will find fault in something else that other people say is A-Okay. (read my other post above)

      the point of this whole discussion is STOP TELLING ME what to do! just STOP. go do your own thing and i’ll do mine. if we happen to cross paths in that time, i will do my best to not interrupt yours and i hope you treat me with the same respect. if not, well, that is a different issue that you can’t avoid or prepare for.

      just like football, video games are both a release from normal everyday life, an inspiration for creativity, intelligence, and artistry, they are a way to show off natural or disciplined skills, a great motivator and reward system, an outlet for behavior outside of work or other social environs, and a heck of a lot of fun.

      and, just like football, video games are a potential for anger, violence, abuse, and other “evils”.

      my argument in this is so that people will STOP pinpointing video games as the ONLY negative influence in a kid’s life. it is NOT, and i wish people would recognize that.

      sports, religion, government, glee club, a date, a classroom, the sidewalk, dinner, the subway… these are ALL areas that have potential to both enlighten and influence. we need to stop focusing on the negative.

      if not, then we should outlaw organized religion…

      THE number one KILLER of humans of all time by a WIDE margin.

      should we outlaw that?

      please, please, please recognize these things before you pigeonhole video games as some devil-made evil.

      and don’t forget to PICK UP YOUR TRASH !!

  37. Learn to parent your children instead of ignoring what games they buy and TV shows they watch.

  38. Learn to parent your children instead of ignoring what games they buy and TV shows they watch.

  39. Whenever i hear an argument about violent video games, it reminds me of FPS Doug. But he wasnt real. Real people can distinguish between video games an reality.

  40. Whenever i hear an argument about violent video games, it reminds me of FPS Doug. But he wasnt real. Real people can distinguish between video games an reality.

  41. Until people start seriously considering banning this kinda of sexuality and violence on TV and movies then eliminating it from video games is just f* stupid. Enough said,

    Double Standard much???

    These stupid parents and politicians who want to get rid of this have probably never played video games and then they bitch about violence in them and then probably go home and watch the sopranos or resevoir dogs and kill bill.

    F* off.

    • My parents have never played a videogame in their lives. Yet my mum constantly asks me if I should be playing such violent games. I pointed out that no gun is shaped like an x-box controller, so it's not like they're actually going to be much use if I DID want to go out and be violent anyway.

  42. Until people start seriously considering banning this kinda of sexuality and violence on TV and movies then eliminating it from video games is just f* stupid. Enough said,
    Double Standard much???

    These stupid parents and politicians who want to get rid of this have probably never played video games and then they bitch about violence in them and then probably go home and watch the sopranos or resevoir dogs and kill bill.
    F* off.

  43. I recently read an artikel about GTA bieng commented by various (not to mention independent) experts from the field of psychotics.

    They said that this is the same thing as Elvis and his hips, new medium, old generation who fears it.

    Shielding your children from violence doesn't make it go away, when do they start to realize that.

    You have to learn them how to deal with it, if you don't and they get trown in to the big game of life they'll be confronted with it anyway and they basicly become birds for the cat.(Belgium saying)

  44. I recently read an artikel about GTA bieng commented by various (not to mention independent) experts from the field of psychotics.
    They said that this is the same thing as Elvis and his hips, new medium, old generation who fears it.

    Shielding your children from violence doesn’t make it go away, when do they start to realize that.
    You have to learn them how to deal with it, if you don’t and they get trown in to the big game of life they’ll be confronted with it anyway and they basicly become birds for the cat.(Belgium saying)

  45. The only people who impose this kind of violence on others are those that are already predisposed to it. They might mimic something they saw in a movie or video game, but the desire and emotional wreckage has to already be in place. A video game never has, nor will, inflict the desire for violence on someone that is not previously ready to be violent.

  46. I think it depends on the society's structure. If from the very beginning it' s been suppressed (like some Arab nations, and certain dictatorships), the separation of fantasy and reality will be misconstrued.
    As for the western societies (U.S.A. and its similar countries), their exposure to fantasy and fiction has been ingrained that normally people (and specially kids) have a basic idea of what is real, what is condonable, and what is appropriate for every situation.

    To individuals who would argue that entertainment/media made them do it, it's just their way of finding a scapegoat and taking responsibility with their misguided views/actions

  47. Last I checked GTA was an 18 game. Now, this is the thing. Once you reach 18, you should have a grasp of reality, no?
    If your parents knowingly give you the game before you're 18, and it has an effect, it's probably because they haven't raised you properly.
    And if you don't know the difference between reality and a game by 18, again, it's probably your parents' fault.

    It just saddens me greatly, that parents and the media use videogames as an excuse for bad parenting :\