How the Mind Works

Neuroanatomist Jill Bolte Taylor had an opportunity few brain scientists would wish for: One morning, she realized she was having a massive stroke. As it happened — as she felt her brain functions slip away one by one, speech, movement, understanding — she studied and remembered every moment. This is a powerful story about how our brains define us and connect us to the world and to one another.

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22 Responses to How the Mind Works

  1. Oh and.. don't let her annoying voice dissuade you from watching the video.. this is one of the most interesting presentation I've heard in a long, long time.

  2. Oh and.. don’t let her annoying voice dissuade you from watching the video.. this is one of the most interesting presentation I’ve heard in a long, long time.

  3. I think it's disgusting that a supposedly intelligent person engages in mindless babble about "connected life force"

    Jill had a stroke. That physical event affected her perception of the world. That's all there is to say about it. It's an "interesting" presentation, but her conclusions are nonsense.

    • I think it's sad that you question this lady's intelligence. tolerance is a good quality and respect for other views too. you may be right but then again you may not be. there is no proof either way yet so perhaps you could be more considered and less egocentrically arrogant.

      What she describes may be a result of the injury she suffered but it is elegantly and movingly put. And just imagine if she is right!

      • She was using that 'mindless babble' to explain how she perceived the different cortices of the brain worked. I would not agree with you in this case Tony. Keep an open eye at how she worded her speech.

        Example of such: 'I am an energy being… you are an energy being… as we are a human family.' She is explaining that the left hemisphere of the brain is highly sensory oriented. Just using very polite language to do so.

        Well done Jill, thank you for the presentation. (Even though I know you will not see this)

        • … Or was it the right hemisphere… (Para 2). ><

          That is an embarrassing error. If it was right, then this is an embarrassing reply.

          Oops!

  4. I think it’s disgusting that a supposedly intelligent person engages in mindless babble about “connected life force”

    Jill had a stroke. That physical event affected her perception of the world. That’s all there is to say about it. It’s an “interesting” presentation, but her conclusions are nonsense.

    • I think it’s sad that you question this lady’s intelligence. tolerance is a good quality and respect for other views too. you may be right but then again you may not be. there is no proof either way yet so perhaps you could be more considered and less egocentrically arrogant.
      What she describes may be a result of the injury she suffered but it is elegantly and movingly put. And just imagine if she is right!

      • She was using that ‘mindless babble’ to explain how she perceived the different cortices of the brain worked. I would not agree with you in this case Tony. Keep an open eye at how she worded her speech.

        Example of such: ‘I am an energy being… you are an energy being… as we are a human family.’ She is explaining that the left hemisphere of the brain is highly sensory oriented. Just using very polite language to do so.

        Well done Jill, thank you for the presentation. (Even though I know you will not see this)

        • … Or was it the right hemisphere… (Para 2). ><
          That is an embarrassing error. If it was right, then this is an embarrassing reply.

          Oops!

  5. So if I get stinking drunk and tell you I saw pink elephants, you'd assume that the alcohol let me see a reality ordinarily hidden from us?

    Of course not. But make it spiritual mumbo-jumbo and you'll sop it up like milk.

  6. So if I get stinking drunk and tell you I saw pink elephants, you’d assume that the alcohol let me see a reality ordinarily hidden from us?

    Of course not. But make it spiritual mumbo-jumbo and you’ll sop it up like milk.

  7. I read "My Stroke of Insight" in one sitting – I couldn't put it down. I laughed. I cried. It was a fantastic book (I heard it's a NYTimes Bestseller and I can see why!), but I also think it will be the start of a new, transformative Movement! No one wants to have a stroke as Jill Bolte Taylor did, but her experience can teach us all how to live better lives. Her TED.com speech was one of the most incredibly moving, stimulating, wonderful videos I've ever seen. Her Oprah Soul Series interviews were fascinating. They should make a movie of her life so everyone sees it. This is the Real Deal and gives me hope for humanity.

  8. I read “My Stroke of Insight” in one sitting – I couldn’t put it down. I laughed. I cried. It was a fantastic book (I heard it’s a NYTimes Bestseller and I can see why!), but I also think it will be the start of a new, transformative Movement! No one wants to have a stroke as Jill Bolte Taylor did, but her experience can teach us all how to live better lives. Her TED.com speech was one of the most incredibly moving, stimulating, wonderful videos I’ve ever seen. Her Oprah Soul Series interviews were fascinating. They should make a movie of her life so everyone sees it. This is the Real Deal and gives me hope for humanity.