Monopoly Gets iFever

Photo Credit: Raymond Wong/DVICE

Monopoly is one of those games that was simply a classic, but they constantly felt the need to rejig. I suppose with the shortening attention span of children these days, and the fact that you see four-year-olds playing with their parent’s iPads, Hasbro must have felt like they needed to keep up with the times.

And keep up they have! I’m actually rather intrigued by this new “Monopoly zAPPed”. While “Monopoly Live” creates a kinda creepy robot fifth player that takes on the role of judge, ref, and banker, as well as adding some new “mini-games” features, it seems that Monopoly zAPPed does all that with your iOS device.

There’s a fake debit card coated in “conductive paint” technology created by Volumique that will be able to be tapped against your iPhone to make purchases. There will also be mini-games on the device to get out of jail (cool!).

Of course, I’ve always been a bit of traditionalist with my gaming experiences (I still own a PS1 for crying out loud!) and so the idea of there no longer being money for me to neatly tuck under the board as we play…well that sounds just slightly horrific.

All the same, if I can win a game on the iPhone to get out of jail…

The Game of Life is also meant to get zAPPed removing the awesome spinny thing in the centre (which makes me sad…but also happy because the spinny thing totally didn’t work on our board). There’s also meant to be awesome little Nintendo Mii-type characters and “family” snapshots at the end of the game  with your little adventures. Kinda funky.

Both games will be sold for $25 each later on this year.

[Via DVICE]

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3 Responses to Monopoly Gets iFever

  1. A monopoly game that relies on an i-devices battery life…….

    one way to speed up the game I suppose

  2. I tend to think that kids have a shortening attention span these days because we keep buying into this sort of immediate gratification nonsense!

    Ok sure, Monopoly may be just a board game, but it always had an strong educational aspect as well. It was the first exposure most of us had to handling cash, investing in property, saving for improvements, negotiating power deals, entering into financial partnerships, and planning for future expenses—like making sure you’ve got enough money to weather the fiscal devastation should you fail to successfully hopscotch through your brother’s “Hotel Row” via Community Chest, Luxury Tax, or one of those blasted railroads.