Hey Everyone! Remember Us? [Pic]

Hey, it’s 3 1/2, 5 1/4, and 8-inch chilling on a table, resting in floppy heaven after a life of hard work. Thanks guys! Installing NT via those twenty-two 3 1/2 floppies was really a blast.

I also remember those awesome floppy-throwing contest we used to organize during BBS GT’s in the early 90’s, back when I was part of ACiD Productions. Those were fun times!

But what about you, dear geeks? Anyone among you guys have some fond memories related to these ancient artifacts? Let us know in the comments section below!

[Picture Source: Wikipedia]

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56 Responses to Hey Everyone! Remember Us? [Pic]

  1. So are floppies officially out of production? I know they've been building legacy-based hardware to support them, as well as floppies themselves. Seems like they were still making floppies as recent as 2006.

  2. I remember installing Windows 95 with about 9 3 1/2" floppy disks in my 486-processor computer. Unfortunately, some disks were corrupted so the installation took HOURS. Oh yeah, I remember perfectly those days when you could lose very important files (school projects) because of a damaged floppy disk *Sighs*

  3. Playing Sim City and Moraff's Revenge on a single 3 1/2" floppy back in my high school days.

    Takes me back.

    It always amazes me how much technology grows by leaps and bounds – I'm a WoW player, and the idea that it would take 12,445 of the 3 1/2" disks just to install the game I play most these days is unbelievable.

  4. Playing Sim City and Moraff's Revenge on a single 3 1/2" floppy back in my high school days.

    Takes me back.

    It always amazes me how much technology grows by leaps and bounds – I'm a WoW player, and the idea that it would take 12,445 of the 3 1/2" disks just to install the game I play most these days is unbelievable.

  5. Playing Sim City and Moraff’s Revenge on a single 3 1/2″ floppy back in my high school days.

    Takes me back.

    It always amazes me how much technology grows by leaps and bounds – I’m a WoW player, and the idea that it would take 12,445 of the 3 1/2″ disks just to install the game I play most these days is unbelievable.

  6. The 8" floppies made lethal ninja stars.

    At a company I worked for back in the early 80s, their whole accounting application suite would run off two of those 8" floppies, which each held about 170KB IIRC. The two floppy drives and CPU (a PDP 11/03) occupied a cabinet about the size of a washing machine. You could get the whole thing with a monitor and software for about $10K. That was just before the PC revolution.

  7. I remember when my projects had to be turned in in 3.5 floppy discs… I would give the teacher two just in case one of them was corrupted…

    I even remember when I bought my first USB drive/memory stick… It had a 256 MB capacity and it cost me nearly one hundred dollars!!!! *darn I paid a helluva lot of money for that*

  8. I remember in middle school I did a presentation on Nicaragua. The presentation involved a lot of pictures, sounds, and animation (middle school, amirite?), so it was huge. My dad helped me load it onto THREE floppy disks, and before my presentation I had to spend like 10 minutes loading my 5-minute presentation onto the computer, piece by piece.

  9. I remember in middle school I did a presentation on Nicaragua. The presentation involved a lot of pictures, sounds, and animation (middle school, amirite?), so it was huge. My dad helped me load it onto THREE floppy disks, and before my presentation I had to spend like 10 minutes loading my 5-minute presentation onto the computer, piece by piece.

  10. I remember in middle school I did a presentation on Nicaragua. The presentation involved a lot of pictures, sounds, and animation (middle school, amirite?), so it was huge. My dad helped me load it onto THREE floppy disks, and before my presentation I had to spend like 10 minutes loading my 5-minute presentation onto the computer, piece by piece.

  11. During my study I needed to present some topic to show my presentation skills. So I dicided to show the history of floppies. I still had 3.5" and 5.25" disks and I even borrowed a disk puncher (You know that thing, so you are able to write on both sides of a 5.25" disk?).

    I did not have an 8" disk – so I created one out of paper. Anyway, during my presentation I just showed the real disks. But someone really asked, if I also know about the 8" disks. When I then just fetched the paper replica – and it was quite realistic if you were just looking at it from some distance – I was the hero of the day :-)

    • Gawd, I have a disk puncher in the original box.

      And I have some single- or double-density 3.5" disks that I was going to give away to Goodwill, in original shrink wrapping. (I could have a pack-rat problem!)

  12. I had an Apple IIc with the standard 5.25" floppy drive … I had a word processor called MouseWrite (essentially a clone of MacWrite but for Apple II-series computers), and when it was time to spell check your work, you would take out the main floppy and put in the spell check floppy… and that thing would grind and grind and grind while it scanned the document and compared each word to the dictionary entries. I could take an hour to spell check a 5-page paper!!

    • Oh, memories!

      In high school, I'd go down the to local university to key punch my cards for a computer class (didn't want to mark sense them (anyone remember that?), put them into the card reader for an IBM 360/50 and stand in line with the students in front of a huge (entertainment unit-sized) printer. When the printer jammed, the cover would open up with a big whirring and hissing, and the air flow to keep the paper moving could be felt if you were close enough to it.

      Thanks, soubriquet, for jarring that from my grey matter.

    • Oh, memories!

      In high school, I'd go down the to local university to key punch my cards for a computer class (didn't want to mark sense them (anyone remember that?), put them into the card reader for an IBM 360/50 and stand in line with the students in front of a huge (entertainment unit-sized) printer. When the printer jammed, the cover would open up with a big whirring and hissing, and the air flow to keep the paper moving could be felt if you were close enough to it.

      Thanks, soubriquet, for jarring that from my grey matter.

  13. It's amazing to think how fast technology moves. As recently as 2006 I was still using floppies to transfer work between college and home. Flash drives were just starting to get cheap enough to be a viable replacement, and I remember being very excited when I found that I could fit *all* my work onto my 256Mb drive!

    I still have a 3.5" drive in my PC just in case, although it must be a couple of years since I've used it.

  14. It's amazing to think how fast technology moves. As recently as 2006 I was still using floppies to transfer work between college and home. Flash drives were just starting to get cheap enough to be a viable replacement, and I remember being very excited when I found that I could fit *all* my work onto my 256Mb drive!

    I still have a 3.5" drive in my PC just in case, although it must be a couple of years since I've used it.

  15. I still got 10 of each format in a box. next to my original QIC-40, QIC-80 and 10.5 inch reel of 9 track tape. Just to show my kids that there was a other time then gigabytes USB sticks and DVD-R's :-)

  16. I still got 10 of each format in a box. next to my original QIC-40, QIC-80 and 10.5 inch reel of 9 track tape. Just to show my kids that there was a other time then gigabytes USB sticks and DVD-R’s :-)

  17. Lol. I actually just received a sealed 10-pack of 5.25" floppies last week for my Apple IIe. Those things are still surprisingly easy to find. Anyone got any extra DS/DDs? I'll take 'em.

  18. I remember the eject buttons, and how the early ones used to have almost enough kick to let the disk drop out onto the desk. At school we soon mastered the art of hitting the eject button fast enough so that the disk fell into our waiting hands.
    The manufacturers must have caught wind of this, because the springs on the eject mechanisms seemed to become more powerful as time went on. My last floppy srive could shoot disks about 1½ feet when they landed on the floor.
    I also remember the tapes we used for our Spectrum II console. That thing sucked.

  19. I liked flipping through a magazine or comic book while waiting to load floppy 5of20 in the drive. Alot of happy memories anticipating a new game while the drive slowly hummed and thunked its way through a stack of disks.

  20. First and last time I saw 8" floppies was on a shelf in one of the electronic imaging research labs at Kodak in the early 90's (college job, whoot!). I also spent a lot of time transferring megapixel images back and forth from Sparc workstations to tape because we just didn't have enough hard drive space. :)

  21. First and last time I saw 8" floppies was on a shelf in one of the electronic imaging research labs at Kodak in the early 90's (college job, whoot!). I also spent a lot of time transferring megapixel images back and forth from Sparc workstations to tape because we just didn't have enough hard drive space. :)

  22. It's kinda funny to think about it, but it probably wont be too long before GeeksAreSexy will ask if anyone remembers CDs, DVDs, or BluRay Disks, and we'll all be laughing about how cheap yottabyte drives have become.

  23. It’s kinda funny to think about it, but it probably wont be too long before GeeksAreSexy will ask if anyone remembers CDs, DVDs, or BluRay Disks, and we’ll all be laughing about how cheap yottabyte drives have become.

  24. Had a box of 5.25's sitting on a windows sill temporarily – storm came up, blew them out the window and rained on them for a few hours before I found them. Covered in mud and grit – took all the disk out of the covers, washed them all, hung them up on a line to dry, put them all back together and they all worked –not bad!!

  25. I used to be a support rep for Microsoft back in the Win95 days. Having someone on the phone and helping them FFR with floppies was awesome – instant 45 minute smoke break.

  26. I remember installing MS Office on Windows 95 (25 3,5″ disks) , using MS DOS 3.30 (booting from floppy, no hard drive). One of the cool features the 5,25″ disks had was that you could fold the disk, put in in your pocket and the disk was still usable ( at least readable). I have some 3.5 and 5.25 for historical reasons.

  27. I remember installing MS Office on Windows 95 (25 3,5" disks) , using MS DOS 3.30 (booting from floppy, no hard drive). One of the cool features the 5,25" disks had was that you could fold the disk, put in in your pocket and the disk was still usable ( at least readable). I have some 3.5 and 5.25 for historical reasons.

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