Ask [GAS]: How did you come to realize that you were a geek?

We’ve all done it; a project that we hold dear in our memory and that made us realize that darn, being a geek is pretty darn sexy after all. For me, it probably was when a few friends and I installed and customized our own Telegard BBS, which was running on an old 286, in the late 80’s. This thing was running on a 9600 baud modem and was receiving around 20 to 30 calls per day. This may sound laughable when compared to what even the smallest website can get today, but we were really proud of what we had accomplished. This eventually led me to start a career in IT and, one day, start this little place that I’ve come to throw so much time into.

But what about you, dear readers? What was the turning point that made you realize that you were going to be a geek, and that this geekiness was going to define how you live the rest of your life? Was it an event, or maybe a crazy project that popped in your mind one day?

Whatever the case, we’d love to hear about it! As usual, the comments section is open for your thoughts!

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36 Responses to Ask [GAS]: How did you come to realize that you were a geek?

  1. at about age 3, Through experimentation and observation, I described to my mom the mechanism and linkages that must exist in the bathtub drain to make the lever work. to open and close it. I asked her for verification of my mechanical theory. She just kinda stood there and said "I don't know" and I was crushed, I thought she knew everything.

    Years later i got to see i was right, when there was a plumbing problem and i got to see the mechanism.

  2. at about age 3, Through experimentation and observation, I described to my mom the mechanism and linkages that must exist in the bathtub drain to make the lever work. to open and close it. I asked her for verification of my mechanical theory. She just kinda stood there and said “I don’t know” and I was crushed, I thought she knew everything.

    Years later i got to see i was right, when there was a plumbing problem and i got to see the mechanism.

  3. I'm not sure when, but I think it was when I first realized that there were people that hate Star Wars, & Star Trek for no apparent reason, suck.

    Usually those people are dumb jocks, snobby girls that talk endlessly about themselves, or rednecks with very little imaginative abstract thinking capabilities.

  4. I’m not sure when, but I think it was when I first realized that there were people that hate Star Wars, & Star Trek for no apparent reason, suck.

    Usually those people are dumb jocks, snobby girls that talk endlessly about themselves, or rednecks with very little imaginative abstract thinking capabilities.

  5. To it's got to be doing some really awesome chemistry experiments in 8th grade… then building my first website in a month the next year… I it became a reality when I chose to study Mechatronics Engineering.

  6. To it’s got to be doing some really awesome chemistry experiments in 8th grade… then building my first website in a month the next year… I it became a reality when I chose to study Mechatronics Engineering.

  7. Same as you GAS. I ran a BBS called The Post Office off of an Apple ][e in 6th (to the 9th) grade shortly after these systems came out. Similarly, 20-40 calls were taken every day and I even had a $5 quarter-year or $15 annual charge that people did pay to help the upkeep of the quality of articles written by myself and others introducing them to computers. Starting in the 7th grade, I was able to offer FidoNet by way of UUCP feeds. In 9th grade, the BBS stopped because I needed my phone line for communication to friends. Then instead of going to college in 1991, since computers weren't taught really yet, I opened up and used my college funds to start a business. Now .. a 40-line BBS with chat, file-transfer and a dedicated SLIP connection to an internet provider. I also provided private-label business file-transfer services mainly for CAD-related file-transfer drawings from vendor to customer distribution, and even some technical support needs. So that's when it all started ..

    In addition, from 6th grade through today .. I've used every version of Microsoft Flight Simulator that has come out, and have logged over 2,300 flight hours. 5 years ago, I went and got my private and instrument rating. My instructor learned that I used computer flight simulators pretty quickly, because I kept lining up guages in the airplane — that's because on the computer I didn't know what I was doing. Navigationally in the air, you correct the flight path, not the knobs!

  8. Same as you GAS. I ran a BBS called The Post Office off of an Apple ][e in 6th (to the 9th) grade shortly after these systems came out. Similarly, 20-40 calls were taken every day and I even had a $5 quarter-year or $15 annual charge that people did pay to help the upkeep of the quality of articles written by myself and others introducing them to computers. Starting in the 7th grade, I was able to offer FidoNet by way of UUCP feeds. In 9th grade, the BBS stopped because I needed my phone line for communication to friends. Then instead of going to college in 1991, since computers weren’t taught really yet, I opened up and used my college funds to start a business. Now .. a 40-line BBS with chat, file-transfer and a dedicated SLIP connection to an internet provider. I also provided private-label business file-transfer services mainly for CAD-related file-transfer drawings from vendor to customer distribution, and even some technical support needs. So that’s when it all started ..

    In addition, from 6th grade through today .. I’ve used every version of Microsoft Flight Simulator that has come out, and have logged over 2,300 flight hours. 5 years ago, I went and got my private and instrument rating. My instructor learned that I used computer flight simulators pretty quickly, because I kept lining up guages in the airplane — that’s because on the computer I didn’t know what I was doing. Navigationally in the air, you correct the flight path, not the knobs!

  9. I've always had a love of science fiction (Star Wars, Star Trek, and eventually all other kinds) so I guess that was my nascent geekness breaking out. It wasn't solidified until high school, though.

    I never even touched a real computer (outside of the old Apple IIe's that populated my 6th grade computer lab in the very late 80's) until I was a junior in high school (1995 – 1996). It was an old IBM 386 running Windows 3.1. We had a slew of them in my Computerized Material Handling class at the vocational school I attended. I just started "playing" with it, learning what you could do with it, reinstalling Windows when needed, and eventually upgrading all of our class room to Windows 95.

    I went to college for Microsoft Systems Technology and was part of the first few generations of MCSE's (and part of the notorious generation that flooded the market with people who didn't necessarily know what they were doing and who passed the exams thanks to braindump sites). In retrospect, a more complete university program would have been beneficial for fleshing out the concepts of information systems and technology as a whole, versus learning just the essentials to pass the Microsoft exams and get a job.

    Ironically a friend of mine dubbed me with the nick-name "The Sexy Geek" about three years ago, before I even knew about this site. It's nice to see she wasn't alone in her thoughts about those of the Geekier persuasion.

  10. I’ve always had a love of science fiction (Star Wars, Star Trek, and eventually all other kinds) so I guess that was my nascent geekness breaking out. It wasn’t solidified until high school, though.

    I never even touched a real computer (outside of the old Apple IIe’s that populated my 6th grade computer lab in the very late 80’s) until I was a junior in high school (1995 – 1996). It was an old IBM 386 running Windows 3.1. We had a slew of them in my Computerized Material Handling class at the vocational school I attended. I just started “playing” with it, learning what you could do with it, reinstalling Windows when needed, and eventually upgrading all of our class room to Windows 95.

    I went to college for Microsoft Systems Technology and was part of the first few generations of MCSE’s (and part of the notorious generation that flooded the market with people who didn’t necessarily know what they were doing and who passed the exams thanks to braindump sites). In retrospect, a more complete university program would have been beneficial for fleshing out the concepts of information systems and technology as a whole, versus learning just the essentials to pass the Microsoft exams and get a job.

    Ironically a friend of mine dubbed me with the nick-name “The Sexy Geek” about three years ago, before I even knew about this site. It’s nice to see she wasn’t alone in her thoughts about those of the Geekier persuasion.

  11. My transition to geekdom was when I began teaching myself Visual Basic to code AOL "progs" back when I was in 8th grade – only one year after my family getting our first PC. Things only escalated from there but to keep a long story short, and after being indefinitely banned from AOL, I am now a software developer. xD

  12. My transition to geekdom was when I began teaching myself Visual Basic to code AOL “progs” back when I was in 8th grade – only one year after my family getting our first PC. Things only escalated from there but to keep a long story short, and after being indefinitely banned from AOL, I am now a software developer. xD

  13. I've allways bein' a geek… But i really realized it when i talk with other "geekfriends"… But you'll know it when you say thing like "42 is the answer" and you're the only one to laugh…. =D

  14. I’ve allways bein’ a geek… But i really realized it when i talk with other “geekfriends”… But you’ll know it when you say thing like “42 is the answer” and you’re the only one to laugh…. =D

  15. I am a bad example of a geek overall. I don't go to conventions, but I do love watching the videos of them posted to YouTube. I digitally stalk Felicia Day thru The Guild and Twitter, and she was named #1 hot girl geeks love to watch in a list posted on here recently.

    My journey started in the 7th grade when a friend showed me what HTML could do. Fast-forward 6 years and I go to college for a BIT. Fast-forward 4 years and I start working at a software development shop. I try programming, and find I get bad headaches from trying to solve problems all day. I tried doing DB stuff, but there wasn't enough work to go around in my section so they asked me to move on. Last and best I tried testing, and found I know just a tiny bit more than most testers about the technical backing, but am not as smart as a standard programmer. Hence the name, dumb tech geek.

    I love testing. It's pretty much a license to break other people's stuff, tell them to fix it, then complain again when they spell something wrong.

    Recent example of how I'm a bad geek: I've adopted saying 'the cake is a lie' out loud randomly, but have never played the game the line comes from. Portal, right?

  16. I am a bad example of a geek overall. I don’t go to conventions, but I do love watching the videos of them posted to YouTube. I digitally stalk Felicia Day thru The Guild and Twitter, and she was named #1 hot girl geeks love to watch in a list posted on here recently.
    My journey started in the 7th grade when a friend showed me what HTML could do. Fast-forward 6 years and I go to college for a BIT. Fast-forward 4 years and I start working at a software development shop. I try programming, and find I get bad headaches from trying to solve problems all day. I tried doing DB stuff, but there wasn’t enough work to go around in my section so they asked me to move on. Last and best I tried testing, and found I know just a tiny bit more than most testers about the technical backing, but am not as smart as a standard programmer. Hence the name, dumb tech geek.
    I love testing. It’s pretty much a license to break other people’s stuff, tell them to fix it, then complain again when they spell something wrong.
    Recent example of how I’m a bad geek: I’ve adopted saying ‘the cake is a lie’ out loud randomly, but have never played the game the line comes from. Portal, right?

  17. At a friend's house and getting the 1200 baud modem on his computer to dial and connect to mine. We had no idea what to do after that, but it was amazing that we could get the 2 machines to connect to one another.

  18. At a friend’s house and getting the 1200 baud modem on his computer to dial and connect to mine. We had no idea what to do after that, but it was amazing that we could get the 2 machines to connect to one another.

  19. The moment I started to realize I was a geek is when my first PC came in the mail from Heathkit(Zenith used to own them). All the components were in a separate bag and had to be soldered to the motherboard, resisters, capacitors, etc. I learned ZBasic on the PC.

  20. The moment I started to realize I was a geek is when my first PC came in the mail from Heathkit(Zenith used to own them). All the components were in a separate bag and had to be soldered to the motherboard, resisters, capacitors, etc. I learned ZBasic on the PC.

  21. I've been a geek for a longer time then I've thought of myself as one. The first time I really thought that I was a complete and total geek was when I became the president of my school's science and engineering club, as well as the vp for the anime club. After the elections, I sat back for a second and thought to myself, "damn, I really am a geek."

    That was one of the happiest moments of my life.

  22. I’ve been a geek for a longer time then I’ve thought of myself as one. The first time I really thought that I was a complete and total geek was when I became the president of my school’s science and engineering club, as well as the vp for the anime club. After the elections, I sat back for a second and thought to myself, “damn, I really am a geek.”

    That was one of the happiest moments of my life.

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