Google Asks: What is a browser?

A browser is a search engine??? Really? It’s pretty hard to believe that in 2009, of all the people who were interviewed for this video, less than 8% actually knew what a browser was. I tell you folks, this is truly a sad day for the geek nation. It seems that we’ve got a lot of work on our hands to educate the infidels.

[Via TechEblog]

Advertisement





12 Responses to Google Asks: What is a browser?

  1. As much as we think "internet = mainstream" it doesn't mean technical literacy has improved. In fact, IMHO, Myspace is just another AOL.

  2. As much as we think “internet = mainstream” it doesn’t mean technical literacy has improved. In fact, IMHO, Myspace is just another AOL.

  3. Just because people use a computer every day doesn't mean they know what it is or even have a clue how it works. most people just have Internet Explorer and know using it they can explore the internet and have no interest in learning about it. Reminds me of a theory I once heard the computerized cupcake. Give some one a cupcake they will take it ask whats in it and use it tell them its a computerized cupcake they wont ask question they just accept it and look at it like a deer caught in headlights. Its funny how any thing to do with technology cause most people to forget common sense and accept it as some mystical thing they can never understand. Its getting better little by little, but as it gets better, it also gets worse because computers are becoming black boxes. We simplify all the complex stuff into a black box and then users just look at it and say it works or it doesn't, and they expect the black box to do everything so they don't have to care or ask questions.

    Also I thought a browser was an enemy of Mario's with a typo.

  4. Just because people use a computer every day doesn’t mean they know what it is or even have a clue how it works. most people just have Internet Explorer and know using it they can explore the internet and have no interest in learning about it. Reminds me of a theory I once heard the computerized cupcake. Give some one a cupcake they will take it ask whats in it and use it tell them its a computerized cupcake they wont ask question they just accept it and look at it like a deer caught in headlights. Its funny how any thing to do with technology cause most people to forget common sense and accept it as some mystical thing they can never understand. Its getting better little by little, but as it gets better, it also gets worse because computers are becoming black boxes. We simplify all the complex stuff into a black box and then users just look at it and say it works or it doesn’t, and they expect the black box to do everything so they don’t have to care or ask questions.

    Also I thought a browser was an enemy of Mario’s with a typo.

  5. Wow. I really would have expected the people of New York to be smarter than this!

    But I suppose all the Internet geeks are inside on their computers. Not wandering the streets.

  6. Wow. I really would have expected the people of New York to be smarter than this!

    But I suppose all the Internet geeks are inside on their computers. Not wandering the streets.

  7. What almost made me cry was I asked an older lady who works with me DEVELOPING WEB APPLICATIONS, and she said "Google" when I asked her what a browser was.

    Wozniak dreamed of a world where everyone would know how to program, just like (most) everyone in our world knows how to text message. It almost seems that the farther technology goes, the more it promotes people to give up figuring out how it works and just labeling it all as 'technical stuff' that their kids get to troubleshoot.

  8. What almost made me cry was I asked an older lady who works with me DEVELOPING WEB APPLICATIONS, and she said “Google” when I asked her what a browser was.
    Wozniak dreamed of a world where everyone would know how to program, just like (most) everyone in our world knows how to text message. It almost seems that the farther technology goes, the more it promotes people to give up figuring out how it works and just labeling it all as ‘technical stuff’ that their kids get to troubleshoot.