Are ATM Machines Safe to Use?

ATMs are everywhere today and provide crooks with a relatively easy way to rob you blind. In the following video, the crew from The Real Hustle demonstrates how easy it is for a thief to get his hands on your ATM card information and PIN number.

So now that you’ve seen this, do you still think that ATM machines are safe to use? Being in the place of the young woman in the video, would you have noticed that the machine she was using had been tampered with?

[Via TechEblog]

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10 Responses to Are ATM Machines Safe to Use?

  1. Yes, must be careful when accessing Automated Teller Machine machines with our Personal Identification Number numbers.

    (i.e. be careful with redundant expansions of acronyms :D)

  2. Yes, must be careful when accessing Automated Teller Machine machines with our Personal Identification Number numbers.

    (i.e. be careful with redundant expansions of acronyms :D)

  3. You missed another factor. These third party ATMs are vulnerable to internal skimmer which you'd never see. A few eastern Europeans/Russians were convicted of this crime several years ago in Canada. They took the system for millions of dollars. Funds were being withdrawn or purchases made around the world.

    I *only* ever use an ATM at a bank branch. I will not use an ATM standing out by itself anywhere.

    I also pay for small purchases with cash thus minimizing the number of usages of my debit card. A side benefit is more financial privacy as folks in the bank or elsewhere can't see your daily activities.

  4. You missed another factor. These third party ATMs are vulnerable to internal skimmer which you’d never see. A few eastern Europeans/Russians were convicted of this crime several years ago in Canada. They took the system for millions of dollars. Funds were being withdrawn or purchases made around the world.

    I *only* ever use an ATM at a bank branch. I will not use an ATM standing out by itself anywhere.

    I also pay for small purchases with cash thus minimizing the number of usages of my debit card. A side benefit is more financial privacy as folks in the bank or elsewhere can’t see your daily activities.

  5. This is so disgusting that people do this sort of thing. It happened to me last weekend and $1000 was taken out of my bank account, thankfully my bank caught it and shut down my card before any more could be taken, and they have already credited the money back to me so hopefully they've caught the jerks who did this. Anyone who would do this needs to die in a fire. And I will never use a non-bank-labeled bank machine again.

  6. This is so disgusting that people do this sort of thing. It happened to me last weekend and $1000 was taken out of my bank account, thankfully my bank caught it and shut down my card before any more could be taken, and they have already credited the money back to me so hopefully they’ve caught the jerks who did this. Anyone who would do this needs to die in a fire. And I will never use a non-bank-labeled bank machine again.

  7. This has been a big story lately in Australia (Sydney at least) where ATMs have been found to be tampered and many have been robbed.

    I have read another article online and saw a presentation produced by an official from a major bank in Australia. Key points in that presentation are that use only the ATMs you are familiar with and carefully examine the card reader to see if there is a blinking light indicating the card being read. ATMs in Australia all have such indicators on the reader, I'm not sure about other countries, but I won't doubt the same or similar practice is adopted.

    Combined with other points from this video are to be observant and careful about your surroundings (which I think is uber imporant not just to spot the fraud but also for your own personal safety) and should try to take money from ATMs attached a bank, preferably your own bank, you should be quite safe from the fraud.

    Though there is another point I would advocate and practise myself, and that is to always cover the keypad with something to avoid the PIN being discovered.

  8. This has been a big story lately in Australia (Sydney at least) where ATMs have been found to be tampered and many have been robbed.

    I have read another article online and saw a presentation produced by an official from a major bank in Australia. Key points in that presentation are that use only the ATMs you are familiar with and carefully examine the card reader to see if there is a blinking light indicating the card being read. ATMs in Australia all have such indicators on the reader, I’m not sure about other countries, but I won’t doubt the same or similar practice is adopted.

    Combined with other points from this video are to be observant and careful about your surroundings (which I think is uber imporant not just to spot the fraud but also for your own personal safety) and should try to take money from ATMs attached a bank, preferably your own bank, you should be quite safe from the fraud.

    Though there is another point I would advocate and practise myself, and that is to always cover the keypad with something to avoid the PIN being discovered.