Klein Bottle House Looks like a Crashed UFO

Designed by McBride Charles Ryan, the Klein Bottle experimental house has first started as a sphere, but as shown in the picture above, was deconstructed to provide functional living space to its inhabitant. The green geeks among you will be pleased to learn that the structure also features a rain water collection system and a multitude of solar panels. Given the chance, would you be interested in living in a house that looks like this?

[Via Dornob]

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9 Responses to Klein Bottle House Looks like a Crashed UFO

  1. Why is it a Klein bottle house? If it's a 2D object with zero volume, I don't think I'd like to live there, where would I put my stuff? Looks nice though.

    • It's the name of the concept… it's a bit stupid when you think of it since it doesn't have the properties of a klein bottle…

      • This is not the real Klein bottle house, google it and you'll find the right picture for it (same architect though) the real one is really like a klein bottle house

  2. Why is it a Klein bottle house? If it’s a 2D object with zero volume, I don’t think I’d like to live there, where would I put my stuff? Looks nice though.

    • It’s the name of the concept… it’s a bit stupid when you think of it since it doesn’t have the properties of a klein bottle…

  3. The name may be inappropriate, but I love the shapes, spaces, the light. I'd LOVE to live in that !

    I think that there is a real need for us to rethink architecture as a whole and dare to support ambitious projects (and I don't only mean "big" by ambitious). The current tools (new knowledge in physics, new materials, new ways of producing energy, new IT) beg us to use them to compensate for the epic FAILs of the 60's to 80's.

    I live in Paris, and as much as I love the typical Haussman buildings, my geek-sense keeps on tingling with the obvious lack of optimisation of space and light (and sound !). The city as a whole may look grrreat, but it's not that great to live in, and it's harder and harder to get the authorisations to have work done in your flat.

  4. The name may be inappropriate, but I love the shapes, spaces, the light. I’d LOVE to live in that !

    I think that there is a real need for us to rethink architecture as a whole and dare to support ambitious projects (and I don’t only mean “big” by ambitious). The current tools (new knowledge in physics, new materials, new ways of producing energy, new IT) beg us to use them to compensate for the epic FAILs of the 60’s to 80’s.

    I live in Paris, and as much as I love the typical Haussman buildings, my geek-sense keeps on tingling with the obvious lack of optimisation of space and light (and sound !). The city as a whole may look grrreat, but it’s not that great to live in, and it’s harder and harder to get the authorisations to have work done in your flat.