RFID Wardriving for Fun and Profit

By hooking a $250 Motorola RFID reader and an antenna to his laptop, Chris Paget was able to easily harvest and clone multiple RFID identity documents while driving through San Francisco. Fortunately for the victims Chris is a white hat hacker and only did this to prove that using RFID-enabled identify cards can only be a bad thing for everyone.

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2 Responses to RFID Wardriving for Fun and Profit

  1. I was so gonna post this. It should be noted that he really only found two passport codes that he shows on this video. In my mind, this doesn’t go far enough to prove his concept.

    However, his theories are correct. If applied at a chokepoint, along with some other type of recording device, such as a video camera looking at faces as they pass the card reader, an organization could identify people and put names to faces.

    Now whether or not this is bad is still debatable. Some say that this is very bad since RFID should be applied to inventory and not people. Yet everyone of those naysayers walk around with a iPhone hardcoded to a 3G network to pinpoint their movements and also tie their identity to Apple’s iTunes and their credit card information.

  2. I was so gonna post this. It should be noted that he really only found two passport codes that he shows on this video. In my mind, this doesn't go far enough to prove his concept.

    However, his theories are correct. If applied at a chokepoint, along with some other type of recording device, such as a video camera looking at faces as they pass the card reader, an organization could identify people and put names to faces.

    Now whether or not this is bad is still debatable. Some say that this is very bad since RFID should be applied to inventory and not people. Yet everyone of those naysayers walk around with a iPhone hardcoded to a 3G network to pinpoint their movements and also tie their identity to Apple's iTunes and their credit card information.