Einstein Proven From the DARK SIDE

By Will Sullivan
Contributing Writer, [GAS]

This is especially for the cosmology wunderkinds among us geeks; hey, it takes geeks of all kinds!  Among “the rest of us,” we merely semi-brilliant folk, Einstein may be most famous for his General Relativity theory, which is mind-blowing enough; however, he also famously regretted to himself and the truly brilliant astro-physics cognocenti what he felt at the time was his truly greatest “blunder”: that he had to “fit” a tiny, slight constant into his calculations to make the whole thing “work.” Everything “worked,” but only with that tiny nudge, that he apparently felt may have been dishonest.

Ironically, he himself was not dishonest about that “nudge,” and his calculations surely showed such (to those capable of understanding them!).  And, here’s where it all gets a little sticky, or weird, and pretty cool…

It seems that his “cosmological constant” nudge actually has been found to be a real, measurable phenomenon.  Scientists using both Earth-based and spaced-based telescopes across spectra have confirmed that so-called “dark energy” is driving the universe apart—counteracting the consolidating effects of gravity.  As a matter of perceived fact, the universe is accelerating its expansion effects.  The tiny force that can account for this effect—such that even totally empty space has mass (and therefore energy)—corresponds pretty much exactly with Einstein’s “cosmological constant” nudge.

Not that anyone truly understands it all—just that it fits calculations.  Perhaps it “looks” or operates thusly:

No one understands gravity—the attractions of objects in curved spacetime to one another—let alone the increasing (tiny) force that is driving everything away from everything else, at an accelerating rate, that counteracts the gravity force.

“Dark energy” is the answer, but we don’t even understand the question…although Einstein did, intuitively…he just made it all work out, and was right, in the end.  His other major regret–in effect that he couldn’t calculate or overtly make room for “God”–has yet to be fulfilled…or has it?  Hopefully all the things we don’t understand right now, we will come to understand in time…

Comments always are welcome!

[Via Space and Wired]

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10 Responses to Einstein Proven From the DARK SIDE

  1. Thanks, Kiltak,

    Yep, I didn't mean to suggest Einstein believed in "God" in the conventional, organized-religion, sense. He definitely was pentheisstic, in the "everything is one" sense, and found his pursuit of knowledge of the awesome universe to be a spiritual kind of quest. Another site on Eisntein and God can be found here:

    http://www.spaceandmotion.com/albert-einstein-god

    Also, anyone specifically looking to reconcile modern cosmology with the biblical myths in Genesis might enjoy physicist Gerald L. Schroder's book "Genesis and the Big Bang: The Discovery of Harmony Between Modern Science and the Bible," NY: Bantam Books, 1990.

    • You may be right… or wrong..

      Einstein himself stated quite clearly that he did not believe in a personal God:

      "It was, of course, a lie what you read about my religious convictions, a lie which is being systematically repeated. I do not believe in a personal God and I have never denied this but have expressed it clearly."

      However, a lot of people are debating wether Einstein was a believer or not… some of them consider that even though he said "personal god", this does not mean that he didn't believe in a "higher being"..

      A letter from him was published in may, in which he makes his view of god very clear.. (http://www.guardian.co.uk/science/2008/may/12/peopleinscience.religion)..

      BUT, "Despite his categorical rejection of conventional religion, Brooke said that Einstein became angry when his views were appropriated by evangelists for atheism. He was offended by their lack of humility and once wrote. "The eternal mystery of the world is its comprehensibility.""

      Whatever… I guess we'll never truly know. I personally don't really care :)

    • You may be right… or wrong..

      Einstein himself stated quite clearly that he did not believe in a personal God:

      "It was, of course, a lie what you read about my religious convictions, a lie which is being systematically repeated. I do not believe in a personal God and I have never denied this but have expressed it clearly."

      However, a lot of people are debating wether Einstein was a believer or not… some of them consider that even though he said "personal god", this does not mean that he didn't believe in a "higher being"..

      A letter from him was published in may, in which he makes his view of god very clear.. (http://www.guardian.co.uk/science/2008/may/12/peopleinscience.religion)..

      BUT, "Despite his categorical rejection of conventional religion, Brooke said that Einstein became angry when his views were appropriated by evangelists for atheism. He was offended by their lack of humility and once wrote. "The eternal mystery of the world is its comprehensibility.""

      Whatever… I guess we'll never truly know. I personally don't really care :)

  2. Thanks, Kiltak,

    Yep, I didn't mean to suggest Einstein believed in "God" in the conventional, organized-religion, sense. He definitely was pentheisstic, in the "everything is one" sense, and found his pursuit of knowledge of the awesome universe to be a spiritual kind of quest. Another site on Eisntein and God can be found here:

    http://www.spaceandmotion.com/albert-einstein-god

    Also, anyone specifically looking to reconcile modern cosmology with the biblical myths in Genesis might enjoy physicist Gerald L. Schroder's book "Genesis and the Big Bang: The Discovery of Harmony Between Modern Science and the Bible," NY: Bantam Books, 1990.

  3. An interesting adjunct to this are the recent (past 5-10 years) discussions involving M-Theory, which may well have found a way to mathematically express Einstein’s “nudge”, and move us closer (or provide) the Final Theory. Thus far, it has proven sufficient to unify all 5 String Theories, as well as succeding where others have failed in their attempts to mathematically combine gravity and quantum mechanics. The recent special on Discovery Channel regarding M-Theory was quite exciting!

  4. An interesting adjunct to this are the recent (past 5-10 years) discussions involving M-Theory, which may well have found a way to mathematically express Einstein's "nudge", and move us closer (or provide) the Final Theory. Thus far, it has proven sufficient to unify all 5 String Theories, as well as succeding where others have failed in their attempts to mathematically combine gravity and quantum mechanics. The recent special on Discovery Channel regarding M-Theory was quite exciting!

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