Five sci-fi scenarios that will come true

By Mark O’Neill

An interesting little article has cropped up on PC World about “five sci-fi scenarios that will eventually become true”.   They are :

The most intriguing one in my opinion has to be the holodeck.   With programs such as Second Life becoming more and more advanced, the possibility of a fully-fledged holodeck can’t be that far off.

The biometric stuff is already partly with us to a certain extent with the biometric passport.    But according to the article, “in a few years, we’ll be using fingerprint, voice, iris, or retinal scans to log on to Web sites and make purchases.”   Is it just me or does this sound downright scary?   I’d much rather just stick to typing in a password.

Advertisements
Advertisement




8 Responses to Five sci-fi scenarios that will come true

  1. More than security, I liked the biometric implementation in shopping malls where Shops identifying a returning customers and call him with offers. I wish that turns true.

  2. Biometric technology, in my opinion, is not inherently frightening. What is scary is the almost unlimited potential for criminally-minded people, corporations, and governments to abuse it. This is, of course, true of any technology.

    How difficult would it be to create contact lenses that are replicas of your irises? On the other hand, those same lenses could be used to hide your true identity. And if these possibilities become reality, will it then be made illegal to wear these lenses? Do we really want shops to

    How much information about ourselves are we willing to give our governments? How much should we give? In the UK, there is a database comprised of the DNA sequences of its citizens. People who have been pulled over for only speeding are getting their mouths swabbed. I leave it to you to decide the merits of such a program. But we can also use another science-fiction example, Gattaca, to see how DNA can be used as a tool for corporate and government repression.

    It isn’t the tech. It’s people we need to be afraid of.

  3. More than security, I liked the biometric implementation in shopping malls where Shops identifying a returning customers and call him with offers. I wish that turns true.

  4. Biometric technology, in my opinion, is not inherently frightening. What is scary is the almost unlimited potential for criminally-minded people, corporations, and governments to abuse it. This is, of course, true of any technology.

    How difficult would it be to create contact lenses that are replicas of your irises? On the other hand, those same lenses could be used to hide your true identity. And if these possibilities become reality, will it then be made illegal to wear these lenses? Do we really want shops to

    How much information about ourselves are we willing to give our governments? How much should we give? In the UK, there is a database comprised of the DNA sequences of its citizens. People who have been pulled over for only speeding are getting their mouths swabbed. I leave it to you to decide the merits of such a program. But we can also use another science-fiction example, Gattaca, to see how DNA can be used as a tool for corporate and government repression.

    It isn't the tech. It's people we need to be afraid of.

Leave a Reply

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.