A Thinner and Cheaper Alternative to the Macbook Air

Think the Macbook Air is thin? Check out this alternative! It’s actually thinner and costs a lot less too!

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31 Responses to A Thinner and Cheaper Alternative to the Macbook Air

  1. * Can Display a variety of documents.
    * Display photos to your relatives.
    * No need for batteries
    * Very fast 3D rendering (Origami Plug-in required)
    * Instant Bootup
    * Comes Pre-installed with writing, drawring and calcutiating programs as well as a variety of games
    * Multiplayer games on the same system via multitouch
    * Many distrubutions avalible (Plain, Lined, Dotted, Squared, also a variety of colours)
    * Inovative filing system

    Oh and after the day I had on Monday
    * Database system that’s easier than Access

  2. * Can Display a variety of documents.

    * Display photos to your relatives.

    * No need for batteries

    * Very fast 3D rendering (Origami Plug-in required)

    * Instant Bootup

    * Comes Pre-installed with writing, drawring and calcutiating programs as well as a variety of games

    * Multiplayer games on the same system via multitouch

    * Many distrubutions avalible (Plain, Lined, Dotted, Squared, also a variety of colours)

    * Inovative filing system

    Oh and after the day I had on Monday

    * Database system that's easier than Access

  3. While your device may be cheaper, it is certainly not thinner or lighter.

    You see: you are comparing the wrong models. You are using the single-unit model, when in fact many reams should be compared instead.

    According to Ray Larson of Berkley, one printed paper can hold approximately 5kb. However, to be more generous let’s say that a single printed sheet can hold half of a MB.

    The default Macbook Air ships with an 80 gb hard drive. However, for the sake of the comparison, let us assume you go with a solid state disk (which would include similar quality controls to paper), which is 64 gb.

    1 gb = 1024 mb. Therefore, 64 gb * 1024 = 65536 mb.

    Let us assume that half of that space is used for the operating system and applications. Thus, we are left with 32768 mb to store documents on.

    If a sheet of paper = 0.5 mb, then 32778/0.5 = 65536 pages of paper.

    Generally accepted is that a sheet of standard paper is 0.1 mm thick. However, to give you the benefit of the doubt, I will say that it is 0.05 mm thick.

    65536*0.05=3276.8 mm thick

    Now, the MacBook Air is 19.4 mm thick at it’s thickest point. 3276.8 – 19.4 = 3257 mm. So, your device must actually be 3257 mm thick to achieve similar functionality to the Macbook Air. Busted!

      • Man, it’s a joke.

        I did think this was a very funny parody. I also think that the Macbook Air is a rather ridiculously expensive device for what you get and would never buy one. Just pointing out that mathematically speaking it is much thicker to use paper. Don’t believe me that someone would use that much paper for stuff which can be done digitally? Walk into a school…

      • Man, it’s a joke.

        I did think this was a very funny parody. I also think that the Macbook Air is a rather ridiculously expensive device for what you get and would never buy one. Just pointing out that mathematically speaking it is much thicker to use paper. Don’t believe me that someone would use that much paper for stuff which can be done digitally? Walk into a school…

        • If we want to split hairs, a couple of reams or paper is cheaper than a macbook air. Plus, its compatible with pencils, pens, AND crayons.

          (and before any flame wars start, this is also a joke)

  4. While your device may be cheaper, it is certainly not thinner or lighter.

    You see: you are comparing the wrong models. You are using the single-unit model, when in fact many reams should be compared instead.

    According to Ray Larson of Berkley, one printed paper can hold approximately 5kb. However, to be more generous let's say that a single printed sheet can hold half of a MB.

    The default Macbook Air ships with an 80 gb hard drive. However, for the sake of the comparison, let us assume you go with a solid state disk (which would include similar quality controls to paper), which is 64 gb.

    1 gb = 1024 mb. Therefore, 64 gb * 1024 = 65536 mb.

    Let us assume that half of that space is used for the operating system and applications. Thus, we are left with 32768 mb to store documents on.

    If a sheet of paper = 0.5 mb, then 32778/0.5 = 65536 pages of paper.

    Generally accepted is that a sheet of standard paper is 0.1 mm thick. However, to give you the benefit of the doubt, I will say that it is 0.05 mm thick.

    65536*0.05=3276.8 mm thick

    Now, the MacBook Air is 19.4 mm thick at it's thickest point. 3276.8 – 19.4 = 3257 mm. So, your device must actually be 3257 mm thick to achieve similar functionality to the Macbook Air. Busted!

      • Man, it's a joke.

        I did think this was a very funny parody. I also think that the Macbook Air is a rather ridiculously expensive device for what you get and would never buy one. Just pointing out that mathematically speaking it is much thicker to use paper. Don't believe me that someone would use that much paper for stuff which can be done digitally? Walk into a school…

        • If we want to split hairs, a couple of reams or paper is cheaper than a macbook air. Plus, its compatible with pencils, pens, AND crayons.

          (and before any flame wars start, this is also a joke)

  5. Arthus,

    Ahh you fell into the Megabyte trap that computer manufacturers lay. If you look closely, there’s a little superscript “2” after the specifications for the hard drive. Upon scrolling, you find this:

    1GB=1 billion bytes. Actual formatted capacity less.

    So… Let’s say we use your formula but instead use 64,000,000 bytes as our starting point. That gives us 62,500 usable space. Now we all know that you can print out source/object code, so more appropriately we should factor in the entire storage of the drive including the operating system. Therefore, I charge that when printed, the contents of a full MacBook Air would be:

    If a sheet of paper = 0.5 mb, then 62,500/0.5 = 125,000 sheets of paper. Then using our incredibly thin tracing paper (0.05mm thick):

    125,000*0.05 = 6250 mm thick, about 2 feet thick.

    Got it? :-)

  6. Arthus,

    Ahh you fell into the Megabyte trap that computer manufacturers lay. If you look closely, there's a little superscript "2" after the specifications for the hard drive. Upon scrolling, you find this:

    1GB=1 billion bytes. Actual formatted capacity less.

    So… Let's say we use your formula but instead use 64,000,000 bytes as our starting point. That gives us 62,500 usable space. Now we all know that you can print out source/object code, so more appropriately we should factor in the entire storage of the drive including the operating system. Therefore, I charge that when printed, the contents of a full MacBook Air would be:

    If a sheet of paper = 0.5 mb, then 62,500/0.5 = 125,000 sheets of paper. Then using our incredibly thin tracing paper (0.05mm thick):

    125,000*0.05 = 6250 mm thick, about 2 feet thick.

    Got it? :-)

  7. 2 or 3 foot tall stack of paper is still cheaper. For $5 a ream, by my place, I’d save so much more than buying an “Air”…

  8. 2 or 3 foot tall stack of paper is still cheaper. For $5 a ream, by my place, I'd save so much more than buying an "Air"…

  9. You forget, in addition, the macbook hard drive can be erased and reused over and over again for its life cycle. Meaning, for the equivalent on paper, you either need a lot of white-out, erasers, or just replacement reams, which increases costs to…

  10. You forget, in addition, the macbook hard drive can be erased and reused over and over again for its life cycle. Meaning, for the equivalent on paper, you either need a lot of white-out, erasers, or just replacement reams, which increases costs to…

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