The Longest Word in the English Language


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We have been bested, my fellow Word Nerds.

The longest word in the English language officially has 189,819 letters and takes three and a half hours to pronounce!

…And it’s all for the full chemical name of a 5-letter, 2-syllable human protein called “titin.”

If you’re REALLY interested — or REALLY bored — check out the video of Dmitry Golubovskiy, CEO of Esquire Russia, actually pronouncing it!

[Via Geekologie]





15 Responses to The Longest Word in the English Language

  1. oh god – his expression at 0.07.

    With a single glance he says: "For what I'm about to do – I hate each and every one of you." :D

  2. Umm, no, 30 seconds was more than enough.

    Life is too valuable to waste listening to that, and my condolences to him on the loss of 3 and half hours of his life. The poor schmuck!

  3. It is not strictly speaking true that "The longest word in the English language officially has 189,819 letters".

    There is no body to officiate on such things, so "officially" isn't applicable. "Word" is also debatable, since this sort of term is generally considered a formula — more like a recipe written as a compound word for convenience — than an actual word. Only the most common will be in dictionaries, and those because they are widely used enough to *also* be words in their own rights. The *word* for this chemical is "titin".

    One could perfectly well produce arbitrarily long chemical names — there's no limit on how many monomers of all different types you can chain together if you want. The only distinction this one has is that it appears in nature.

  4. Uhm, the flower goes from upright to dead in a second. There's no progression of it wilting. It's just dead.

  5. However, lexicographers regard generic names of chemical compounds as verbal formulae rather than English words. Quote from Wikipedia
    So after all it's not a real word…

  6. He didn't read it in one setting that's obvious. He starts at noon roughly, but 2 hours in it's just past 2:30. Also, at the 2h 10m mark there is an obvious break in the video and the plant seems to "instantly" die.