5 Epic Science Fiction Book Series to Read This Summer

So it’s summer, which means that maybe you’ve got some free time on your hands. Maybe you’re even really lucky and will be spending some of that time on the beach, or by the pool. Maybe it’s the kind of free time that can really only be filled by taking a serious nosedive into an epic book series that will eat your life until you’ve finished it. Well if science fiction is your cup of tea, here are some of my favorite series. Though if you get sucked in and neglect the rest of your life, don’t blame me!

Saga of the Skolian Empire, by Catherine Asaro

I once heard someone call these books “science fiction for girls,” which is pretty silly in my opinion – but there aren’t that many series that combine hard science fiction with romance, and Asaro does an amazing job in these books. And if you are a fan of hard scifi, especially in the form of physics and biotechnology, don’t doubt Asaro’s cred just because she sneaks in the romantic entanglements – she has a PhD from Harvard and was a physics professor before she started writing full time. The Skolian books are essentially space opera, heavy on the political intrigue, artificial intelligence, and interstellar travel – also strong female characters. The first book in the series by publication is Primary Inversion, but you can also read them in chronological order.

The Night’s Dawn Trilogy, by Peter F. Hamilton

I read these books perhaps a decade ago, and they were my first real foray into space opera – which is really like jumping in headfirst. Though it’s technically a trilogy, the paperbacks were published in two parts for each book – and they were still pretty thick, so trust me when I say that this series still counts as “epic.” The world here is so sprawling that it’s hard to describe the books briefly, but the gist is that it’s a far-future with tension between users of biotechnology and nanotechnology – oh, and a little problem with souls of the dead coming back through living possession. Even though this future is ostensibly a “golden age,” the story of the Night’s Dawn books is still very much about the darker side of humanity. Most people I know who’ve read these either love them or hate them, so be prepared. The first book is The Reality Dysfunction.

The Ender’s Game Series, by Orson Scott Card

Now here’s a no-brainer. If you didn’t read the first book as a kid, now is the time to pick it up – along with the follow-ups. And if you did read it as a kid, it’s the sort of thing you want to try again as an adult, especially if you didn’t get through the entire series. Battle School is just the beginning of the story, and Speaker of the Dead is no children’s book. Again, with a 3000-year span of time over the course of the series, you can always try reading them in chronological order. Though I think I’d still recommend starting with Ender’s Game.

The Dune Novels, by Frank Herbert (and progeny)

I’m not really sure what to say about Dune… I feel like if you’re interested in the idea of reading science fiction series at all then surely you’ve already read these books. These are some of the most influential books in the genre, considered a landmark of world-building and “soft” science fiction (i.e., not focused on technology). The “originals” are of course the first six, from Dune to Chapterhouse: Dune, though after Frank Herbert’s death, his son Brian along with author Kevin J. Anderson have added a number of books to the series. If you really want to take on an epic reading task for the summer, you could try reading the entire franchise in chronological order. Or you could just be traditional and start with Dune.

The Time Quartet, by Madeline L’Engle

You’ve probably read A Wrinkle in Time. If you haven’t, then turn off your computer and go get a copy right this instant. But even if you have, I just want to be sure that you appreciate the true epic nature of the story by reading all of the books tied to it as well. The “quartet” – consisting of A Wind in the Door, A Swiftly Tilting Planet, and Many Waters as well – isn’t even the end of the story. An Acceptable Time, focusing on a child of the next generation, is considered an official follow-up – but there are other connected books as well, such as The Arm of the Starfish. L’Engle is one of those authors whose worlds tend to touch each other all over the place, but at the very least, the eight books about the Murrays and the O’Keefes are the heart of the story. Though to take the epic journey through time travel, biology, and saving the world from evil, you’ll still need to start with A Wrinkle in Time.

Five is actually a pretty short list as far as these things go, and I know that you guys must have more to recommend. So for the benefit of our other readers, comment with your favorite epic scifi series! Or tell us what’s next in your reading queue for the summer. And for your fantasy fans, you’re also in luck, because there might be another post like this coming soon.





126 Responses to 5 Epic Science Fiction Book Series to Read This Summer

    • I second this. The "Old man" series by Scalzi is practically Sci-Fi candy for me. Not as silly as Hitchhikers, but equally entertaining

  1. For epic summer reading, I recommend the four (thick) volumes of Tad Williams' Otherland series. These volumes fall somewhere between cyberpunk and fantasy – there is enough food for thought to keep the mind occupied while providing a page-turning adventure story.

  2. For epic summer reading, I recommend the four (thick) volumes of Tad Williams’ Otherland series. These volumes fall somewhere between cyberpunk and fantasy – there is enough food for thought to keep the mind occupied while providing a page-turning adventure story.

  3. For epic summer reading, I recommend the four (thick) volumes of Tad Williams’ Otherland series. These volumes fall somewhere between cyberpunk and fantasy – there is enough food for thought to keep the mind occupied while providing a page-turning adventure story.

  4. I've been listening (and re-listening) to the Mars Trilogy over the last few months. If you like politics and economics right alongside colonization and terraforming of the solar system then you would love this trilogy.

    • This was the first epic Sci-Fi that I read as a teenager and I really enjoyed them. This series is probably why this genre is my life long favourite. Kim Stanley Robinson did a great job on this series.

  5. I’ve been listening (and re-listening) to the Mars Trilogy over the last few months. If you like politics and economics right alongside colonization and terraforming of the solar system then you would love this trilogy.

    • This was the first epic Sci-Fi that I read as a teenager and I really enjoyed them. This series is probably why this genre is my life long favourite. Kim Stanley Robinson did a great job on this series.

    • I second this. The “Old man” series by Scalzi is practically Sci-Fi candy for me. Not as silly as Hitchhikers, but equally entertaining

    • I second this. The “Old man” series by Scalzi is practically Sci-Fi candy for me. Not as silly as Hitchhikers, but equally entertaining

  6. Will re-read some of these & give others a try. I would also recomend Simon Green DeathStalker series.

    You could also read some of Heinlein's stuff. It isn't a series per se but has common characters that complete a long & complicated story arc. I would start with the classic Moon is a Harsh Mistress http://www.amazon.com/Moon-Harsh-Mistress-Robert-
    Also check out some classic Andre Norton (who has several series)

    OH! Alos like the Anne McCaffery Ship series http://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_sb_noss?url=search

    • Hell yes. And it's not sci-fi, but Stephenson's Baroque Cycle is truly epic, and has much of the same appeal of SF (what with the worldbuilding, scope, appealing geekiness, etc.).

    • Hell yes. And it’s not sci-fi, but Stephenson’s Baroque Cycle is truly epic, and has much of the same appeal of SF (what with the worldbuilding, scope, appealing geekiness, etc.).

  7. Will re-read some of these & give others a try. I would also recomend Simon Green DeathStalker series.

    You could also read some of Heinlein's stuff. It isn't a series per se but has common characters that complete a long & complicated story arc. I would start with the classic Moon is a Harsh Mistress http://www.amazon.com/Moon-Harsh-Mistress-Robert-
    Also check out some classic Andre Norton (who has several series)

    OH! Alos like the Anne McCaffery Ship series http://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_sb_noss?url=search

  8. The Dark is Rising Series is really awesome to. If you like L'Engle, you'll like these. OK, they're a bit more toward the fantasy side of things, but still awesome…and yeah, I'm one of those people that just lumps science fiction and fantasy in together (any sufficiently advanced technology is indistinguishable from magic, after all!).

    Oh, and The Giver, Gathering Blue, and Messenger make a really good trilogy. They speculate on what happens when science is either too involved or not involved enough in our lives.

    • Oh, I definitely agree with this! Sadly I left Dark is Rising off of the (upcoming) fantasy list, but I was thinking maybe I should do one just for young adult books. I actually have a very clear memory of going to a library and telling the librarian that I'd just finished reading Chronicles of Narnia and needed something to read next, and she gave me those books. :)

  9. The Dark is Rising Series is really awesome to. If you like L’Engle, you’ll like these. OK, they’re a bit more toward the fantasy side of things, but still awesome…and yeah, I’m one of those people that just lumps science fiction and fantasy in together (any sufficiently advanced technology is indistinguishable from magic, after all!).

    Oh, and The Giver, Gathering Blue, and Messenger make a really good trilogy. They speculate on what happens when science is either too involved or not involved enough in our lives.

    • Oh, I definitely agree with this! Sadly I left Dark is Rising off of the (upcoming) fantasy list, but I was thinking maybe I should do one just for young adult books. I actually have a very clear memory of going to a library and telling the librarian that I’d just finished reading Chronicles of Narnia and needed something to read next, and she gave me those books. :)

  10. I have to suggest the Acorna Series by Anne McCaffery and Margaret Bell for the first two, McCaffery and Elizabeth Ann Scarborough for the rest. While this should be considered more soft science fiction than anything else, some of the descriptions of alien technology will take your breath away.

    And for those who want to spend the entire summer by the beach and are looking for a suitably hot sci-fi series to go with that–there's Quantum Gravity by Justina Robson. This book is the one that made me realize why sci-fi and fantasy are the same section in bookstores and Robson does it perfectly.

  11. I have to suggest the Acorna Series by Anne McCaffery and Margaret Bell for the first two, McCaffery and Elizabeth Ann Scarborough for the rest. While this should be considered more soft science fiction than anything else, some of the descriptions of alien technology will take your breath away.

    And for those who want to spend the entire summer by the beach and are looking for a suitably hot sci-fi series to go with that–there’s Quantum Gravity by Justina Robson. This book is the one that made me realize why sci-fi and fantasy are the same section in bookstores and Robson does it perfectly.

  12. I am currently in the process of reading the Ender's series. I had read Ender's Game and Ender's Shadow ages ago, but never got past those.

    Asimov's Foundation series is on my list to read as well and worth including on this list.

    I've been meaning to read the Giver again; I had no idea there were two other books to go with it.

  13. I am currently in the process of reading the Ender’s series. I had read Ender’s Game and Ender’s Shadow ages ago, but never got past those.

    Asimov’s Foundation series is on my list to read as well and worth including on this list.

    I’ve been meaning to read the Giver again; I had no idea there were two other books to go with it.

  14. I would recommend the Well World series by Jack Chalker (I think the first one is Midnight at the Well of Souls. It goes for 7 books, then he tossed a couple extra in later). Also by him, the Four Lords of the Diamond(4 books), and a novel, the Web of the Chozen. He has written many other books, but these ones represent my first forays into sci-fi reading when I was about 12. You'll notice from these books that he has a thing for mind transference and body transformation.

  15. I would recommend the Well World series by Jack Chalker (I think the first one is Midnight at the Well of Souls. It goes for 7 books, then he tossed a couple extra in later). Also by him, the Four Lords of the Diamond(4 books), and a novel, the Web of the Chozen. He has written many other books, but these ones represent my first forays into sci-fi reading when I was about 12. You’ll notice from these books that he has a thing for mind transference and body transformation.

  16. There are so many good series. Agree with the person who mentioned Heinlein – the series with Lazarus Long was very influential in my youth.

    Recently I've been a great fan of the Honor Harrington series by David Weber. Great detail in the battle sequences and charecter development makes for great space opera.

  17. There are so many good series. Agree with the person who mentioned Heinlein – the series with Lazarus Long was very influential in my youth.

    Recently I’ve been a great fan of the Honor Harrington series by David Weber. Great detail in the battle sequences and charecter development makes for great space opera.

  18. The Honor Harrington series by David Weber should be a on sci-fi list or series. Especially if you like strong female leads, and lots of tech. I'd also recommend the current offshoot "Torch" series, but you'd probably need to read more Honor books to understand the Weber-verse.

  19. The Honor Harrington series by David Weber should be a on sci-fi list or series. Especially if you like strong female leads, and lots of tech. I’d also recommend the current offshoot “Torch” series, but you’d probably need to read more Honor books to understand the Weber-verse.

  20. Dune is, hands down, one of my favorite stories. However you might want to save some time and skip the rest of the series. First and foremost the sequels and prequels add very little, Dune manages to feel very completed when you set it down. Additionally, it seemed to me that whatever inspiration was responsible for Dune departed before the rest of the series could be written, and it definitely wasn't inherited by his children.

  21. Dune is, hands down, one of my favorite stories. However you might want to save some time and skip the rest of the series. First and foremost the sequels and prequels add very little, Dune manages to feel very completed when you set it down. Additionally, it seemed to me that whatever inspiration was responsible for Dune departed before the rest of the series could be written, and it definitely wasn’t inherited by his children.

  22. Hey, what about the Foundation series? and don't forget all the Heinlein 'future history' novels, or Clarke's Space Odyssey series.

  23. Hey, what about the Foundation series? and don’t forget all the Heinlein ‘future history’ novels, or Clarke’s Space Odyssey series.

  24. I recommend the Chronicles of Solace Trilogy by Roger MacBride Allen. Its a book that involves time travel in wormholes but the book is not necessarily centered around that piece.

  25. I recommend the Chronicles of Solace Trilogy by Roger MacBride Allen. Its a book that involves time travel in wormholes but the book is not necessarily centered around that piece.

  26. Actually, nothing by Orson Scott Card should ever be purchased or read. I wish I could unread them. Orson Scott Card is a bigot and should in no way, shape or form be supported or encouraged.

    That being said, the Ringworld series by Niven is also excellent.

    • Agreed!!

      I loved Ender's Game the first time I read it, and I read a few of the sequels as well although they weren't as good.

      And then I found out what a horrible person Orson Scott Card is, and I wished I could un-read them all, as you say.

      • I certainly understand that. Though I kind of agree with a friend who just said that it makes her want to write Ender's Game slash on principle.

        • I'm not the only one that feels this way then! Sweet!

          It's a shame as I really enjoyed Ender's Game & Ender's Shadow… It was only when I looked into getting the other books that I found out what sort of person Card is.

          :-(

    • I liked Ender's Game a lot, and still do, but I haven't heard about him as a person.

      Totally agree with the Ringworld series, I would add all of the Known Space books because he's really easy to read, and uses very novel ideas in his books.

  27. Actually, nothing by Orson Scott Card should ever be purchased or read. I wish I could unread them. Orson Scott Card is a bigot and should in no way, shape or form be supported or encouraged.

    That being said, the Ringworld series by Niven is also excellent.

    • Agreed!!

      I loved Ender’s Game the first time I read it, and I read a few of the sequels as well although they weren’t as good.

      And then I found out what a horrible person Orson Scott Card is, and I wished I could un-read them all, as you say.

      • I certainly understand that. Though I kind of agree with a friend who just said that it makes her want to write Ender’s Game slash on principle.

        • I’m not the only one that feels this way then! Sweet!
          It’s a shame as I really enjoyed Ender’s Game & Ender’s Shadow… It was only when I looked into getting the other books that I found out what sort of person Card is.
          :-(

    • I liked Ender’s Game a lot, and still do, but I haven’t heard about him as a person.

      Totally agree with the Ringworld series, I would add all of the Known Space books because he’s really easy to read, and uses very novel ideas in his books.

    • ok I fear I might be stepping on a landmine here but why exactly is orson scott card bad ? (I do NOT keep up on any form of literature news etc.. so I really have no idea why you guys hate him)

    • ok I fear I might be stepping on a landmine here but why exactly is orson scott card bad ? (I do NOT keep up on any form of literature news etc.. so I really have no idea why you guys hate him)

  28. The Amber series by Roger Zelazny.

    Hitchhiker's guide to the galaxy by Douglas Adams.

    The sprawl series by William Gibson.

  29. The Amber series by Roger Zelazny.
    Hitchhiker’s guide to the galaxy by Douglas Adams.
    The sprawl series by William Gibson.

  30. I cannot recommend Gene Wolfe's Book of the New Sun series enough. It is remarkable.

    As has been mentioned several times, Asimov's Foundation trilogy is fantastic.

    Also, Arthur C. Clarke's Rama series is pretty great. I would also recommend his novel Childhood's End, even though, its not part of a series.

  31. I cannot recommend Gene Wolfe’s Book of the New Sun series enough. It is remarkable.

    As has been mentioned several times, Asimov’s Foundation trilogy is fantastic.

    Also, Arthur C. Clarke’s Rama series is pretty great. I would also recommend his novel Childhood’s End, even though, its not part of a series.

  32. Where to start?

    The Vorkosigan Saga. By Lois McMaster Bujold

    17 Novels/Novellas total.

    3 Hugos, and 2 Nebula awards in the series.

    IMHO Best described as a Sci-Fi drama. Some of the stories are Mysteries which I did enjoy (even tho i don't like Mystery novels)

    The Honor Harrington series. By David Weber. 11+ novels. Easily described as Horatio Hornblower in space. Incredible read for Military Sci-Fi, highly recommend (First book is free online non-torrent)

    All the above books are easy to find at a local used book store or library

    If you have not read the foundation series by Asimov, or the Lensman Series by E.E. "Doc" Smith. You really never have read Science Fiction

    • Ditto on the Vorkosigan Saga… Miles is one hell of a character to get behind! GREAT series.

  33. Where to start?

    The Vorkosigan Saga. By Lois McMaster Bujold
    17 Novels/Novellas total.
    3 Hugos, and 2 Nebula awards in the series.
    IMHO Best described as a Sci-Fi drama. Some of the stories are Mysteries which I did enjoy (even tho i don’t like Mystery novels)

    The Honor Harrington series. By David Weber. 11+ novels. Easily described as Horatio Hornblower in space. Incredible read for Military Sci-Fi, highly recommend (First book is free online non-torrent)

    All the above books are easy to find at a local used book store or library

    If you have not read the foundation series by Asimov, or the Lensman Series by E.E. “Doc” Smith. You really never have read Science Fiction

    • Ditto on the Vorkosigan Saga… Miles is one hell of a character to get behind! GREAT series.

  34. It may be hard to find, though a local library has a copy, and it is available from Amazon, but Zenna Henderson's People series is a wonderful connected series of short stories.

    Second the Bujold idea, and continue it on into her fantasy series.

    Pratchett, why was he missing from the stuff? Well maybe because his SF rots, but his fantasy is wonderful. British humor and generally has a point or two slipped in. Try the kid's witch series too. Fast start: Going Postal.

    Heinlien. All the stories that were created up to and including A Stranger in a Strange land.

    Niven, especially before Pournell, but still good afterwards.

    Gorden Dickenson, sf and f, well written stuff, action and character, as most of the above are too. The Dorsai series is good soft SF.

    Sharon Lee and Steve Miller, please start with their action/romance novel Agent of Change.

    Ok I mix in fantasy with sf, and a rapid poll of my extensive book collection did not come up with much hard core sf.

  35. It may be hard to find, though a local library has a copy, and it is available from Amazon, but Zenna Henderson’s People series is a wonderful connected series of short stories.
    Second the Bujold idea, and continue it on into her fantasy series.
    Pratchett, why was he missing from the stuff? Well maybe because his SF rots, but his fantasy is wonderful. British humor and generally has a point or two slipped in. Try the kid’s witch series too. Fast start: Going Postal.
    Heinlien. All the stories that were created up to and including A Stranger in a Strange land.
    Niven, especially before Pournell, but still good afterwards.
    Gorden Dickenson, sf and f, well written stuff, action and character, as most of the above are too. The Dorsai series is good soft SF.
    Sharon Lee and Steve Miller, please start with their action/romance novel Agent of Change.
    Ok I mix in fantasy with sf, and a rapid poll of my extensive book collection did not come up with much hard core sf.

  36. Okay, I know it's not Sci-Fi, but I must recommend the Sword of Truth series by Terry Goodkind. First in the series is "Wizards First Rule". You'll be hooked by the fifth chapter. Each book is epic in and of itself, and the entire series must span a dozen volumes, each better than the last.

    Read it! You won't be sorry.

    • While the first 3-4 are ok-good, after that the series turns into the worst crap I have ever had the misfortune to read, absolutely horrid.

  37. Okay, I know it’s not Sci-Fi, but I must recommend the Sword of Truth series by Terry Goodkind. First in the series is “Wizards First Rule”. You’ll be hooked by the fifth chapter. Each book is epic in and of itself, and the entire series must span a dozen volumes, each better than the last.

    Read it! You won’t be sorry.

    • While the first 3-4 are ok-good, after that the series turns into the worst crap I have ever had the misfortune to read, absolutely horrid.

  38. This may be more fantasy than sci-fi (there is a "mad scientist" in it, sort of) but I completely got entranced with the "Thursday Next" series by Jasper Fforde.

    And I still love the whole John Carter of Mars series, even as old as it is.

  39. This may be more fantasy than sci-fi (there is a “mad scientist” in it, sort of) but I completely got entranced with the “Thursday Next” series by Jasper Fforde.

    And I still love the whole John Carter of Mars series, even as old as it is.

  40. Big one i think that i haven't seen mentioned by anyone are the novels by Jack McDevitt revolving around Priscilla Hutchins the series starts with the engines of god and is a total of 5 attention demanding follow ups.

    Also a biggie is the Mars Trilogy by Kim Stanley Robinson i read that series when i was 14 and it shaped my budding political ideals.

    A few others include anything by Alastair Reynolds, Charles Stross, Bruce Sterling or Stephen Baxter

  41. Big one i think that i haven’t seen mentioned by anyone are the novels by Jack McDevitt revolving around Priscilla Hutchins the series starts with the engines of god and is a total of 5 attention demanding follow ups.
    Also a biggie is the Mars Trilogy by Kim Stanley Robinson i read that series when i was 14 and it shaped my budding political ideals.
    A few others include anything by Alastair Reynolds, Charles Stross, Bruce Sterling or Stephen Baxter

  42. I just wish folks would stop combining sci-fi and fantasy.

    They are different.

    Arthur C. did not write 'fantasy'.

  43. I just wish folks would stop combining sci-fi and fantasy.
    They are different.
    Arthur C. did not write ‘fantasy’.

  44. The Sprawl series by William Gibson – Awesome cyberpunk.

    I agree with the Neal Stephenson comment and would like to add anything by Charles Stross to go with that… Your choice of hard Sci-Fi, post-cyberpunk, Modern day Cthulhu or just plain weird… Good stuff!

  45. The Sprawl series by William Gibson – Awesome cyberpunk.
    I agree with the Neal Stephenson comment and would like to add anything by Charles Stross to go with that… Your choice of hard Sci-Fi, post-cyberpunk, Modern day Cthulhu or just plain weird… Good stuff!

  46. I wish people would preface these kind of inane posts with the phrase: "In my opinion these are…" then comments may be more likely to contain pertinant replies…

  47. I wish people would preface these kind of inane posts with the phrase: “In my opinion these are…” then comments may be more likely to contain pertinant replies…

  48. I saw someone up there mention the Foundation books. I STILL dream about those, years later. Truly brilliant and an absolute MUST read.

  49. I saw someone up there mention the Foundation books. I STILL dream about those, years later. Truly brilliant and an absolute MUST read.

  50. Bio of a Space Tyrant – Piers Anthony

    The Dark Tower – Stephen King

    The Wizardry novels – Rick Cook

  51. Bio of a Space Tyrant – Piers Anthony
    The Dark Tower – Stephen King
    The Wizardry novels – Rick Cook

  52. In my opinion (happy now Milander?) the Saga of The Seven Suns, by Kevin J Anderson, is an awesome series and don't forget that part 3 of Peter F Hamilton's 'Void' trilogy is due out, beginning of Sept! For pure grittiness, I'd recommend Richard Morgan's 'Kovacs' arc. Any of Alastair Reynolds books, set in the 'Revelation Space' universe just blow me away but for an epic space opera that's easy reading, EE 'Doc' Smith's Lensman series every time!

  53. In my opinion (happy now Milander?) the Saga of The Seven Suns, by Kevin J Anderson, is an awesome series and don’t forget that part 3 of Peter F Hamilton’s ‘Void’ trilogy is due out, beginning of Sept! For pure grittiness, I’d recommend Richard Morgan’s ‘Kovacs’ arc. Any of Alastair Reynolds books, set in the ‘Revelation Space’ universe just blow me away but for an epic space opera that’s easy reading, EE ‘Doc’ Smith’s Lensman series every time!

  54. philip reeve is good for a bit of light reading. i LOVE Larklight – a childs book, yes, but genius! and the Mortal Engines quartet it very steampunk – lots of airships and mobile cities.

  55. philip reeve is good for a bit of light reading. i LOVE Larklight – a childs book, yes, but genius! and the Mortal Engines quartet it very steampunk – lots of airships and mobile cities.

    • You're right. Peter F. Hamilton's "The Night's Dawn" trilogy is by far the best "epic" SF I've ever read. And I've been reading SF for 45 years so I'm familiar with and have enjoyed just about every author that's been mentioned in this thread. If you've never read Night's Dawn before, you're in for a treat. It's also the longest trilogy I've ever read. In paperback it totals over 3500 pages. The first time I read it was the best week of reading I've ever had.

  56. I just finished two epic series that I LOVE.

    The Stardoc series I read last month and in the last two weeks I just finished the Saga of the Seven Suns.

    Wonderful reading. my only complaint (with both of them) is they take forever getting to the end (wonderful forever lots of twists lots of heavy details love it) and then wham they finish up real fast like they ran out of steam. but still wonderful.

    Looking forward to more more more !! especially hard sci fi.

  57. I just finished two epic series that I LOVE.

    The Stardoc series I read last month and in the last two weeks I just finished the Saga of the Seven Suns.

    Wonderful reading. my only complaint (with both of them) is they take forever getting to the end (wonderful forever lots of twists lots of heavy details love it) and then wham they finish up real fast like they ran out of steam. but still wonderful.

    Looking forward to more more more !! especially hard sci fi.

  58. I just finished two epic series that I LOVE.

    The Stardoc series I read last month and in the last two weeks I just finished the Saga of the Seven Suns.

    Wonderful reading. my only complaint (with both of them) is they take forever getting to the end (wonderful forever lots of twists lots of heavy details love it) and then wham they finish up real fast like they ran out of steam. but still wonderful.

    Looking forward to more more more !! especially hard sci fi.

  59. I just finished two epic series that I LOVE.

    The Stardoc series I read last month and in the last two weeks I just finished the Saga of the Seven Suns.

    Wonderful reading. my only complaint (with both of them) is they take forever getting to the end (wonderful forever lots of twists lots of heavy details love it) and then wham they finish up real fast like they ran out of steam. but still wonderful.

    Looking forward to more more more !! especially hard sci fi.

  60. I just finished two epic series that I LOVE.

    The Stardoc series I read last month and in the last two weeks I just finished the Saga of the Seven Suns.

    Wonderful reading. my only complaint (with both of them) is they take forever getting to the end (wonderful forever lots of twists lots of heavy details love it) and then wham they finish up real fast like they ran out of steam. but still wonderful.

    Looking forward to more more more !! especially hard sci fi.

  61. Totally agree with the Mars Trilogy. One of my faves too. And anything by Asimov. Or Clarke. Adams. However, I would like to suggest the Coyote series by Allen Steele and the Emberverse series by S.M. Stirling. Both are addictive.

  62. Totally agree with the Mars Trilogy. One of my faves too. And anything by Asimov. Or Clarke. Adams. However, I would like to suggest the Coyote series by Allen Steele and the Emberverse series by S.M. Stirling. Both are addictive.

  63. Where to start, for more modern Sci-Fi, i believe David Sherman and Dan Cragg's Starfist series is a decent military in space series, with 14 books and still growing, then Ian Douglas's Heritage, legacy and inheritance trilogy's, as well as his current series Star carrier, the first 3 series being a triple trilogy

  64. C'mon!  No love for the guys who established the Genre?  Future History series by Heinlein?  Foundation by Asimov? The Space Odyssey series of Clarke?

  65. Check out the following authors: Glenn Cook, Lois M. Bujold, David Drake, Jim Butcher, David Weber, Raymond E. Feist, Simon R. Green…they all have series that will keep you entertained….

  66. No particular order but have enjoyed all these amongst others:

    The Lost Fleet series – Jack Campbell (John G Hemry), Military / Hard Sci Fi
    Amtrak Wars series – Patrick Tilley, Post-apocalyptic sci fi / some fantasy
    Polity Universe – Agent Cormac series – Neal Asher – hard sci fi
    Polity Universe – Spatterjay series – Neal Asher – hard sci fi
    The Culture series – Iain M Banks – hard sci fi
    Hidden Empire series – Jaine Fenn, Far Future sci fi
    Dark Tower series – Stephen King – sci fi, fantasy

  67. I second Honor Harrington by David Weber and the Legacy of the Aldenata series by John Ringo. I also submit the "Empire of Man" (or Prince Roger) series co-authored by David Weber and John Ringo. Currently there are four lengthy volumes in this series, and it's worth the read!