The Most Adorable and Awesome Sci-Fi Love Story Ever: The One-Minute Time Machine [Video]

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Warning: Language.

Every time the beautiful Regina rejects his advances, James pushes a red button and tries again, all the while unaware of the reality and consequences of his actions. Directed by Devon Avery. Selected for the Sploid Short Film Festival, a celebration of coolest short films and the filmmakers that make them.

[Sploid]





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6 Responses to The Most Adorable and Awesome Sci-Fi Love Story Ever: The One-Minute Time Machine [Video]

    • No it’s not, they are somewhat similar, but its far from the same. Clock gears are used in both, but not even in the same way.

  1. I wonder if anyone realizes that this concept was taken from a play, by David Ives’s, “Sure Thing”. Exact same set up as in the play. Anyone who studied theater in college probably read, saw, or performed it in some form or fashion.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sure_Thing_(play)

    Synopsis
    The play begins with Bill approaching Betty in a café, asking “Is this chair taken?” To which she replies “Yes.” The bell rings and Bill repeats his question to which Betty says, “No, but I’m expecting somebody in a minute.” The bell rings again, and Bill poses his question again. This process continues until Bill is finally allowed to take a seat. The bell acts as a buffer against all topics of conversation that are potentially negative to building their relationship, allowing them to try another line. By the end of the play, their initial differences in opinion (i.e. literature, movie tastes, romance) have reversed to become perfect companions. Both of them finally agree to fall in love and cherish the other forever.[1]

    Ives takes away any words or beliefs that could be offensive, whether they be sexist remarks or political affiliations. As with Bill’s line:

    “I believe a man is what he is. (Bell) A person is what he is. (Bell) A person is … what they are.”

    As Martin Andrucki (Professor of Theater, Bates College) wrote: “In effect words create, and re-create, his [Bill] future as he goes along. Thus, language itself takes on the power to determine the lives of Bill and Betty.”