LEGO Friends: So, You Liked LEGO Growing Up? [Comic]

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[Source: Seasonal Depression Comics | Like Seasonal Depression on Facebook]

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13 Responses to LEGO Friends: So, You Liked LEGO Growing Up? [Comic]

  1. Correct. the plural for Lego is…… Lego. The plural and singular is the same, other similar examples following the same rule are “Fish”, “Sheep” & “Spacecraft”.

  2. Lego to me is a brand Legos to me means multiple pieces or multiple sets…. I too played with LEGOS.

  3. The odd part is that this comic is pretty much TOTALLY off the mark. The Friends range has been one of the best selling non-licenced lines for Lego over the past few years.

  4. Basically it is for families that don’t want their little girls playing with “boy” toys. They aren’t for everyone, but there is a market for them and they happen to sell rather well.

  5. you know the difference between most boys and girls when it comes to legos? (because actually, even most girls don’t really care if the people are male or female although it is fun to have both). Boys like the SETS and keep them all separate.. Girls like to do whatever they want and mix them all together. The majority of girls are the lego “rule breakers” not the boys. LOL

    most boys I know would never glue their sets together! they want to take them apart and rebuild them exactly as they are! over and over again.. (I would go insane playing that way – but it’s a short trip)

    all Lego would have to do to improve sales at this point is go back to a couple (or even just one) bulk block packages that aren’t sets for any particular direction – just a variety of building materials with a few options. I think they’d be shocked at how many would fly off the shelf for kids to use WITH the individual sets they already purchase.

  6. The girls who want to play with the “boy” LEGO sets can. As ponytail hair is easily found. They’ve been doing that for years and years. As mentioned, you don’t need new product lines, you just need to sell sets with the occasional ponytail.
    It’s the girls who *don’t* want space and ninjas and knights and Marvel/DC superheroes that were left out. Or the parents who are more firm on their kid’s gender role.

  7. I have a daughter who is just old enough to be playing with Duplo blocks. And she likes the set with the horses. I tried to get her to look at the other ones with planes, pirates, and even showed her the Disney princesses set. She liked the horses so that’s what I got her (a huge surprise because she loves princesses). She probly would have taken the pirates one if there hadn’t been girly options, but isn’t it nice that she had a choice?

    Girls don’t need anyone to tell them what kind of toys to play with. I try really hard not to lump her in with gender roles and stereotypes (although other people do at birthdays and Christmas). Some girls are happy to play with space ships and race cars, but others aren’t and that’s OK too. My daughter likes horses, princesses, and Spider-Man, but she only likes those things because we showed her options and let her decide what she likes. Girls just need to be given choices that make sense for who they are, and not what gender roles say they should be, and also not what a wannabe feminist promoting their own ideal says they should be.

    I wish there were girl mini-figs in the other Lego sets, but I also think that comics that make it seem like other girl’s choices are dumb are misogynistic. A girl wants to play with space ships is fine, and so is a boy wanting to play with princesses. I guess this comic wasn’t outright saying other girl’s choices are bad, but the implication is there, and it is pretty much saying the other Lego sets are dumb. You don’t need to say other girl’s choices are bad or dumb in order to promote feminism.

    P.S. Almost everyone I know says Legos when talking about multiple bricks and not the brand name. Maybe it’s not technically right, but it is common usage which is as good as right, and I think it’s funny there were so many comments about it.