Laser-Guided Scissors

I’m not exactly sure how this works, or if it would actually fix my abysmal scissor abilities, but regardless having a laser on my scissors just sounds awesome.

  • Laser-beam will guide you to cut straight with these scissors
  • Laser turns on at the push of a button
  • Requires 2x LR44 cell batteries (included)
  • Size: 8-1/4″ x 3-1/2″ x 1″ (21 cm x 8.9 cm x 2.5 cm)

[$11.95 from Neatoshop | $11.45 from Amazon | Via GeekAlerts]

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8 Responses to Laser-Guided Scissors

  1. A guy I work with has had a pair, still in the package, in his office for several years now.

    The laser will not help you cut a straight line because it is not mounted on the cutting surface. The laser will move with the scissors so your cuts will be just as sloppy as usual (if not worse).

  2. You are missing the point, don’t look at the blade, line the laser line up with end point of where you want to cut and keep it on that point as you cut that will keep the blade parallel to the line you want to cut

    • Yeah, but if your hand shakes, or you tilt or angle the scissors, or the surface being cut moves, you're still gonna have a messed up cut.

      Better to stick with 'old technology"…ie. drawing, scribing, or chalk lining the surface

  3. Yeah the laser makes you cut straight to where the laser points, but if you turn the scissors slightly where the laser points shifts. Kind of like a laser sight on a gun. If the laser is aligned properly you know that initially the gun is pointed at the target as need, but if you pull the trigger too hard to in a jerky fashion you still won't hit what the laser was pointing at very effectively.

    Bobster you are right if you line it up and stare at the line and go it can work, but let's face it, for many people just *using* scissors is a challange let alone expecting them to cut without actually looking at the scissors themselves. ;)

  4. This is stupid. This could only work if the laser would be actually on the back of the scissor. Then it could be used to align your next cut with the already existing cut split behind the scissor, and thus make sure that they both fall in one line.