Geektastic Wizard Stamps [Pics]

Even though I don’t have a big thing for stamps like my pal Mark O’Neill, this new series of stamps from UK’s Royal Mail are definitely geek-worthy and worth a mention on this site.

[Via TDW]

Advertisements
Advertisement




37 Responses to Geektastic Wizard Stamps [Pics]

  1. I'm echoing the 'Where's Gandalf' question, but it seems that these are dedicated to wizards of British origins.

    Still, where the eff is Gandalf?

  2. I applaud the inclusion of Discworld, but why not take the Kidby drawings we all know and love of the characters?

  3. I agree on both the 'Where the elf is Gandalf' And the Awesomeness of Terry Prachetts inclusion here. Also Kidby's interpretation would have been better. But hey These stamps still rock! Think i wil have to 'Collect' them lol

  4. I'm sorry but the greatest wizard of all time is missing seems to be missing. Maybe they're going to bring out a special Gandalf edition?

  5. I went to the post off just yesterday, asked for two 1st class stamps, and got confused when I saw dumbledore instead of the queen XD.

  6. C.S. Lewis'S Narnia?!

    It always irritates me when people hired for graphic design don't have a basic understanding of simple English Language rules. Typos are almost forgiveable because they just happen sometimes, but grammar? C'mon…

      • Apostrophes are used to indicate possession ('the dog's bone') as well as indicating missing letters ('she's coming to see me' for 'she is'), and NOT to indicate a plural ('apostrophes')… ;)

        Andrew's offense is that the rule typically has been if the word ends in an s, then the possessive is simply an apostrophe after the s. However, it seems modernly that both are acceptable. (I personally don't like "Lewis's" either.)

  7. I would assume Gandalf is not there due to the wishes of Tolkien's estate. I have heard they are notoriously defensive with the rights. Just a guess though…

  8. I assume that they just use people that use magic, since the females they are showing are not actually wizards, they would be witches. So Aslan, as a magic user, has as much right to be on there as all the other people. And since these are real stamps, then they can't use Gandalf on a UK stamp if he wasn't even born in the UK.

  9. I assume that they just use people that use magic, since the females they are showing are not actually wizards, they would be witches. So Aslan, as a magic user, has as much right to be on there as all the other people. And since these are real stamps, then they can't use Gandalf on a UK stamp if he wasn't even born in the UK.

    • "they can't use Gandalf on a UK stamp if he wasn't even born in the UK"

      Do I need a visa to holiday in Narnia or the Discworld?

  10. The omission of Gandalf is a puzzler, but this is not a "wizards" theme as such; the theme is "Magical Realms". Still, why no LotR or Hobbit mention at all? Perhaps they plan a set on that, although you'd think they would have done that while the movies were being released, like they did in NZ.

    By the way, you don't have to have been born in the UK to be on a British stamp. Two examples spring to mind: Freddie Mercury (Zanzibar) and Ghandi (India).

    Oh yeah, and there is nothing grammatically wrong with "C S Lewis's Narnia". There are no absolute rules on this, but the general guidance is that, with the possessive of a proper noun ending in s, the s after the apostrophe is written if it is pronounced. I don't know about you, but I'd pronounce it "Lewises Narnia", not "Lewis Narnia".

  11. The omission of Gandalf is a puzzler, but this is not a "wizards" theme as such; the theme is "Magical Realms". Still, why no LotR or Hobbit mention at all? Perhaps they plan a set on that, although you'd think they would have done that while the movies were being released, like they did in NZ.

    By the way, you don't have to have been born in the UK to be on a British stamp. Two examples spring to mind: Freddie Mercury (Zanzibar) and Ghandi (India).

    Oh yeah, and there is nothing grammatically wrong with "C S Lewis's Narnia". There are no absolute rules on this, but the general guidance is that, with the possessive of a proper noun ending in s, the s after the apostrophe is written if it is pronounced. I don't know about you, but I'd pronounce it "Lewises Narnia", not "Lewis Narnia".

Leave a Reply

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.