Things We Say Wrong [Video]

So, are there any grammar nazis out there who want to chime in about this video? :)

[Via Reddit]

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39 Responses to Things We Say Wrong [Video]

    • It's just a matter of time before english will get another couple of flavours, now with the whole world using english to communicate over internet you'll get European english, asian english etc etc etc etc.They are already talking about replacing PH with simply a f here in europe.

      • i swear, if they do that, i may just have to kill something. i already have to spell sulphur with an f. ITS MOTHERFUCKING WRONG!!!!!

        also I belive the title is intended as a joke. you know, that thing named humour?

    • Who cares about the ideas of people, who talk like they don't even know what they're saying.

      We're supposed to be homo sapiens, the sentient ape. Any old simian can replicate the actions of another with monkey see, monkey do, or in this case monkey hear, monkey talk.

      There's a world of difference between those who can listen to or make speeches, read actual books (ones without pictures), or write with paragraphs and punctuation, and those who use TXTSPK and reply tl;dr to anything over a paragraph in length.

      To paraphrase TED; Ideas worth communicating, are worth communicating well.

      • I almost did a tl;dr to your post, but the TED line caught me as I was scrolling by because I agree with it wholeheartedly, so I had to go back and read it all. Boy did I feel a bit guilty. ><

        • I don't even know what half these abbreviations mean! My friends laugh at me because even in texts I use full stops, capital letters, commas etc. But why laugh at me for perfect grammar? Because, my fellow geeks, grammar is not cool! Does that mean I'll give in and turn into everyone else? No, because I'm proud of our language and as long as I'm still using it properly, it's not dead!

  1. Two things jump out at me…

    1.) When someone says "I feel badly" I want to ask, "What's wrong? Did you lose your sense of touch?" When the verb is an action it takes the adverb, but when it's a linking verb (state of mind or being), the subject of the sentence is being described rather than the verb. Therefore, the verb takes an adjective, not an adverb.

    2.) I loved the "a whole nother" rant, and the gentle gibe at "alot." Remember, though, at one time "another" (an other) was as bad an error as alot. How long will it take before alot is considered correct? :P

  2. Two things jump out at me…

    1.) When someone says “I feel badly” I want to ask, “What’s wrong? Did you lose your sense of touch?” When the verb is an action it takes the adverb, but when it’s a linking verb (state of mind or being), the subject of the sentence is being described rather than the verb. Therefore, the verb takes an adjective, not an adverb.

    2.) I loved the “a whole nother” rant, and the gentle gibe at “alot.” Remember, though, at one time “another” (an other) was as bad an error as alot. How long will it take before alot is considered correct? :P

  3. I never understood how "I could care less" would be wrong. It denotes that you care a very small amount and that the next step in caring is not caring. As not caring at all would be a nil value, you can't care less as anything lower than that is not caring at all.

    • that is the fucking point

      you COULDN'T care less, as in you care so little that it would not be possible to care any less

      i COULD care less implies that you care at least a bit, which isn't helpful when you're trying to tell someone you don't care about something

      • It is for precisely this reason that I gave up on correcting my friends and instead changed how I present the cliche. Instead of leaving it at "I couldn't care less," I pause for a moment and add "…well, I could, but it would actually require more effort." They still look at me like I'm crazy, but at least I've taken the time to insult their lack of understanding in the meantime.

    • Actually, "I could care less" does not imply how much you care at all. If you could care less, you could care anywhere from "negligible" to "Wow, this is the best thing EVER", and so "I could care less" covers the same range.
      "I couldn't care less", however, has a very restricted range, and it covers from zero caring to… Well, zero caring. Precisely BECAUSE not caring has a nil value, that is why you can't care less, and hence why the phrase makes sense.

  4. This video is nothing more than a gross oversimplification of a very complex issue, mostly for humorous purposes, but for professional editors it's pretty much just plain stupid.

    Also, Noah Webster suggested replacing the "ph" with the "f" back in the 1800s.

    • And yet you use the Americanism "annoy the hell out of me" :p

      The Americanism that annoys me is "often times". The "times" is superfluous as "often" can only refer to a number of times.

  5. No, I don't mean "badly," I mean "bad." As Jill said, a linking verb takes an adjective, not an adverb. "Feel" is a linking verb in this case because what follows it should modify the noun. "I feel bad" means that the speaker is embarrassed, or ill, or naughty. "I feel badly" means, as Jill also said, that the speaker cannot feel properly; here, the third word modifies the (action) verb and is therefore an adverb. I know I'm just restating what Jill said, but I felt that her post did not properly emphasize that the video was wrong.

    Side note/exception: "I feel well" and "I feel good" are both considered to be correct as descriptions of one's state of being. Obviously, "good," like "bad," can be used to indicate one's emotional state or lack of illness, but in the latter context "well" can also be used to refer to the speaker's physical well-being. "I feel well" might mean, more specifically, "I do not detect illness or infirmity in myself" or something similar.

    Also, the title is just there to remind us that trolling is a art.

    • But you would not say "I feel poor," because that would denote a sense of poverty. Instead you would say "I feel poorly," to denote a state of being. Thus, badly is also a state of being.

      • As a foreign speaker, I always replace a linking verb with 'to be' if I'm not sure, so to me 'I feel poor' would be replaced with 'I am poor', so 'I feel poor' means that you feel like you are not as rich as those around you.
        'i feel poorly' just confuses me, because to me it sounds as if it means you have a poor sense of touch (because I can't replace it with 'I am poorly'), but now I find out it means the same as 'I feel bad'. I'll just add 'poorly' to my list of exceptions…

      • No, because "poorly" in that sense is not an adverb, it's an adjective. You've tried to draw a comparison where none exists because you don't understand the subject.

  6. I feel badly means your capacity to experience touch or emotions is somehow impaired. Silly Americans, must try harderer.

  7. seriously, those of you with all your corrections need to reread what you wrote. i saw gramatical as well as spelling errors. what makes you top stuff?

    • Technically, "the same difference" would be comparing two sets of different things: the difference between A and B is the same as the difference between B and C. Thus there IS a time when "the same difference" is appropriate, the problem is that most people don't know when to use it. *shrug*

      • It often sounds worse, the same as splitting an infinitive or ending a sentence with a preposition. But at other times it sounds better, and regardless, is fine from a traditionalist perspective. If you are opposed to the progression of language (like replacing 'ph' with 'f'), then it makes sense to also oppose the loss of flat adverbs. Which you haven't made a case against, in rebuttal to the MW case.

  8. The thing that started the whole pronuncuation mess was the Great Vowel Shift which, honestly, screwed English up, not so much in the matter of thhe shifting of pronunciation of vowels but in the fact that after the Shift the spelling remained the same until today (and the change occurred in the 14th century). Now even the native speakers can't fugure out how to pronounce certain groups of letters in certain contexts, because the spelling is just so damn erratic.
    Perhaps the best exemplification of this was given by George Bernard Shaw when he said (as a joke) that in English you can spell 'fish' as 'ghoti': gh pronounced /f/ as in tough, o pronounced /?/ as in women, and ti pronounced /?/ as in nation.

    When it comes to the simplifications in grammar (using adjectives instead of adverbs) it's just a matter of language economy, the tendency for people to use the least possible amount of sounds to convey the most amount of information. And in actual contexts, it is very difficult to misunderstand somebody when they say 'You said that wrong' instead of 'You said that wrongly'. It's a normal linguistic change as all that have occured throughout the history, or else we would all still be speaking the common protolanguage.

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