Solar Roadway Prototype

Yes, in concept a solar roadway would be amazing, but I see a few problems with the idea. First, these roads could almost only be installed in countries where there is no snow and where the temperature doesn’t get too cold. Oh, the road’s surface could be heated, but wouldn’t that cost more energy than can actually be produced? Second, what happens when the pavement gets dirty? The efficiency of the pannels would then be severely affected. And what about the price of installing these things? I’m sure the people behind the idea have thought of many of these issues, but unfortunately, they’re not covered in this video, and the official website does not give much more details.

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13 Responses to Solar Roadway Prototype

  1. I disagree with what GaS says about snow states — reduced efficiency doesn't make installation impossible — until it gets to a point where it becomes less cost-effective in the long term than asphalt or concrete.

  2. I disagree with what GaS says about snow states — reduced efficiency doesn’t make installation impossible — until it gets to a point where it becomes less cost-effective in the long term than asphalt or concrete.

  3. Actually, this is the first I've heard of photovoltaic roadways, to my knowledge. Most of the stuff I've read up to this point on solar roads have been, at least mostly, thermal solar. In such a case, given the thermal mass of the most common road construction materials, as long as it got decent sun the problems you've listed would be relatively slight.

  4. Actually, this is the first I’ve heard of photovoltaic roadways, to my knowledge. Most of the stuff I’ve read up to this point on solar roads have been, at least mostly, thermal solar. In such a case, given the thermal mass of the most common road construction materials, as long as it got decent sun the problems you’ve listed would be relatively slight.

  5. Well, they talked about "even at 15% efficiency"… so they considered how inefficient it would be from getting dirty, etc…

  6. Well, they talked about “even at 15% efficiency”… so they considered how inefficient it would be from getting dirty, etc…

  7. well cold wouldnt matter since its not relying on heat to produce electricity, just photons hitting the panels. if the whole road is a grid not all would have to be cleared to work, just enough to net out. if asphalt is 1000$ per ton as he stated, it wouldnt cost much more than that and would honestly probably last longer if they used clear aluminum(yes they have this) or acrylics for the clear "glass" surfaces, however i DO see a problem, you know those areas just before stop signs and lights? how its all rough and bowed? what will keep the surface from bowing there as well since that is due to vehicle weight and the asphalt being pushed forward by stopping vehicles.

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