A Second Opinion on Learning Disorders [Video]

Unfortunately, developmental disorders in children are often diagnosed by observing behavior only, but neuroscientist Aditi Shankardass knew that we should be looking directly at their brains instead. In the following video, she explains how a remarkable EEG device has revealed mistaken diagnoses and transformed children’s lives.

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5 Responses to A Second Opinion on Learning Disorders [Video]

  1. Ah, the TED conference. I really should spend some time looking through their site.

    Anyways, back OT, as someone with Aspergers, I can obviously see how this might be incredibly useful. HOWEVER, I'm *very* skeptical concerning her figures about autism diagnoses (correct plural?). 50% is an absolutely massive figure considering the amount of autistics currently being born (as far as I know, the figure is something like 1 in every 1000 births). I'd just like to see her cite her sources on this one.

  2. Ah, the TED conference. I really should spend some time looking through their site.
    Anyways, back OT, as someone with Aspergers, I can obviously see how this might be incredibly useful. HOWEVER, I’m *very* skeptical concerning her figures about autism diagnoses (correct plural?). 50% is an absolutely massive figure considering the amount of autistics currently being born (as far as I know, the figure is something like 1 in every 1000 births). I’d just like to see her cite her sources on this one.

  3. I would like to find out more about it and how and where you can get an EEG, and how do you request it. I have a child with ADD and I don't want to keep giving him medication that can affect his heart, he also had a bad fall when he was about a year old, he hit his head on the pavement cement, and I have always wondered if that had any effect on his brain.They slightly checked him at the doctors, but they never did a thorough exam. I am really concern about his health and would like to proceed to get him tested to see what his real disability is. He has suffered so much in school because of his diagnosis.I really want to find out about this new observations. Please reply! Thank you.

  4. I would like to find out more about it and how and where you can get an EEG, and how do you request it. I have a child with ADD and I don’t want to keep giving him medication that can affect his heart, he also had a bad fall when he was about a year old, he hit his head on the pavement cement, and I have always wondered if that had any effect on his brain.They slightly checked him at the doctors, but they never did a thorough exam. I am really concern about his health and would like to proceed to get him tested to see what his real disability is. He has suffered so much in school because of his diagnosis.I really want to find out about this new observations. Please reply! Thank you.

  5. @Alma
    The Amen Clinic in the San Francisco East Bay does these tests. They are very expensive and usually not covered by medical insurance. They are also quite controversial and medical specialists who deal with kids with ADHD, Asperger's Syndrome and Autism Spectrum Disorders and not convinced of their utility in most cases.

    The benefit of every drug needs to be evaluated against its unwanted risks or effects. That is why neuro-pharmacologists and other medical practitioners receive lengthy training. The risk of heart problems as the result of taking medications for ADHD is quite low. The risks and deficits associated with taking anti-seizure medications is higher, especially for the older drugs. OTOH, the long-term effects of untreated ADHD and seizure disorders can be quite devastating. They include permanent brain damage, serious injury or death by illness-related accidents, educational deficits, social deficits, delinquency and imprisonment.

    You should consult a neuro-psychologist (micro-testing for specific problems) in order to have your son's cognitive abilities tested and screened for ill-effects consistent with his current ADD diagnosis, his previous head injury and the likelihood of him having undetected seizure activity. If problems which are inconsistent with his current diagnosis are detected he may be referred to either a neurologist or a psycho-pharmacologist for treatment. Medical insurance is much more likely to pay for these specialists than they are to pay for EEG and brain scans, unless they are specifically recommended by these health professionals.