Ask [GaS]: Dirty Duty on the Front Lines of IT

Since a large percentage of our readership is composed of IT pros, we figured this article listing some of the dirtiest jobs in IT may be of interest to some of you.

More often, though, dirty IT jobs put people in tough positions — like having to explain to a crew of arrogant geeks why the network can’t be upgraded the same day payroll needs to run; or why you’re not a spammer despite what it says on your business card; or how lying about your company’s products is probably not a good strategy for long-term growth. You may be forced to take the blame for a failed project even when it’s not your fault or to expose wrongdoing at your workplace even if it puts your career at risk.

Dirty jobs never rest, and neither do the people charged with doing them. Be thankful you aren’t one of them. And if you are — well, at least you have a job. Right?

Got any dirty IT jobs stories to share with us? If so, then we’d love to hear all about them in the comments section below (anonymously, of course!).

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6 Responses to Ask [GaS]: Dirty Duty on the Front Lines of IT

  1. People love to complain out loud about how slow our internet connection and our connection to satalte offices are. When confronted by management I have to explain the difference between the fios or whatever connection they have at home, and a corporate t1. Always a lossing battle that ends with "well my connection at home is alot faster than here'. having home technolgy progress so fast sucks for IT pros as it makes everyone with a home computer and an internet connection an expert.

  2. People love to complain out loud about how slow our internet connection and our connection to satalte offices are. When confronted by management I have to explain the difference between the fios or whatever connection they have at home, and a corporate t1. Always a lossing battle that ends with “well my connection at home is alot faster than here’. having home technolgy progress so fast sucks for IT pros as it makes everyone with a home computer and an internet connection an expert.

  3. We keep a managed Avast on all client machines, tell them to use Google Chrome (which has WOT installed on it) and they still get rogue malware all the time because they still refuse to use anything but the "big blue E" (IE). Then they whine and cry to us when they get the rogues, saying "We have antivirus, why do we get this?!".

    Very frustrating when you do every preventative measure possible, and it's still your fault when it's really theirs.

    • If you manage their desktops, then point the big blue "e" logo icon to the Chrome executable and tell them it's a security patch.

      Yeah, you'll have to fix it every week, but it might be worth it.

  4. We keep a managed Avast on all client machines, tell them to use Google Chrome (which has WOT installed on it) and they still get rogue malware all the time because they still refuse to use anything but the “big blue E” (IE). Then they whine and cry to us when they get the rogues, saying “We have antivirus, why do we get this?!”.

    Very frustrating when you do every preventative measure possible, and it’s still your fault when it’s really theirs.

    • If you manage their desktops, then point the big blue “e” logo icon to the Chrome executable and tell them it’s a security patch.

      Yeah, you’ll have to fix it every week, but it might be worth it.