Epic Scottish Rapper Looks Just Like Half-Life 2’s Father Grigori

Yesterday evening, while idly browsing the web, I stumbled upon the video of a Scottish rapper named “TheChielMeister”. Apart from being totally unintelligible to my ear (Can anyone translate what he says in the comments?), the guy made me think of Half-life 2’s Father Grigori. Check him out below!

The desperate plight of a Moray man who, unable to locate a sufficient quantity of minced beef for his evening meal, finally loses the plot and takes vengeance with his frenzied rap.

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10 Responses to Epic Scottish Rapper Looks Just Like Half-Life 2’s Father Grigori

  1. I couldn't watch more than 15 seconds, it was too terrifying. But the Half-Life guy reminds me of Shel Silverstein.

  2. I couldn’t watch more than 15 seconds, it was too terrifying. But the Half-Life guy reminds me of Shel Silverstein.

  3. … I watched the whole video and have no idea what he was saying. I can't repost it, cuz for all I know he's swearing profusely. Was that a random pic of a naked Santa? Who still speaks Scottish anyway??

  4. … I watched the whole video and have no idea what he was saying. I can’t repost it, cuz for all I know he’s swearing profusely. Was that a random pic of a naked Santa? Who still speaks Scottish anyway??

  5. Here's a clue or two….in Aberdeenshire and parts of Moray the local (Doric Scots) dialect substitutes an 'f' sound for the 'wh' sound at the beginning of certain words.

    So "fuar's ma mince" can be written in Standard English as "where's my mince".

    In the same way, "fit kinna bliddy caper's this" (my favourite line in the rap) means "What kind of bloody caper's this".

    Most modern variants of Lowland Scots can be easily deciphered by speakers of Standard English with very little practise because they mostly consist of English words with non-standard pronunciation of certain vowel sounds. There are very few words of pure Scots origin still used in common parlance anywhere in Scotland.

    If you guys thought this was hard, try translating something in Gaelic!

  6. Here’s a clue or two….in Aberdeenshire and parts of Moray the local (Doric Scots) dialect substitutes an ‘f’ sound for the ‘wh’ sound at the beginning of certain words.

    So “fuar’s ma mince” can be written in Standard English as “where’s my mince”.

    In the same way, “fit kinna bliddy caper’s this” (my favourite line in the rap) means “What kind of bloody caper’s this”.

    Most modern variants of Lowland Scots can be easily deciphered by speakers of Standard English with very little practise because they mostly consist of English words with non-standard pronunciation of certain vowel sounds. There are very few words of pure Scots origin still used in common parlance anywhere in Scotland.

    If you guys thought this was hard, try translating something in Gaelic!

  7. I can get most of what he's saying…but my god he's broader Scots than me

    Six in the moming, oot a ma bed
    Bla bla bla get the paper read
    Raking the tinnie for a wee jam scone
    Nothing but crumbs whit the hell's going on

    Scary dude

  8. Watched the whole thing and I loved it, lol. Made ma mornin'! ^_^

    as for a translation, sorry, am a bit unqualified for that ;)