Are we in control of our own decisions?

In the following video presentation, behavioral economist Dan Ariely, the author of Predictably Irrational, uses classic visual illusions and his own counterintuitive (and sometimes shocking) research findings to show how we’re not as rational as we think when we make decisions.

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8 Responses to Are we in control of our own decisions?

  1. The first illusion is a trick actually. The sides of the table are artificially skewed at to make the table look longer (if the table on the left actually existed, it wouldn’t be square). As is evident by the second illusion, our mind takes in all of the information from a given scene and processes it all at once. There is a reason our mind does this; it’s simply trying to speed up the processing of information by making assumptions. Of course, these assumptions are not always correct and can cause illusions, especially if there’s something wrong with our perspective (like the first illusion).

    As for the rest of this guys ideas, they can be explained quite easily – most people are stupid.

  2. The first illusion is a trick actually. The sides of the table are artificially skewed at to make the table look longer (if the table on the left actually existed, it wouldn't be square). As is evident by the second illusion, our mind takes in all of the information from a given scene and processes it all at once. There is a reason our mind does this; it's simply trying to speed up the processing of information by making assumptions. Of course, these assumptions are not always correct and can cause illusions, especially if there's something wrong with our perspective (like the first illusion).

    As for the rest of this guys ideas, they can be explained quite easily – most people are stupid.

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