Verizon Distributes Anti-iPhone Propaganda to Employees

The following document was apparently leaked from Verizon and serves to brief its employees on many of the iPhone’s not-so-shiny particularities. The document is divided into four sections, each covering a different “myth”.

Myth #1: The iPhone 3G is now twice as fast, but ONLY where AT&T has 3G coverage.

NO WAY! Isn’t that logical? Apparently, AT&T 3G coverage is only available to 40 to 50% of the US population, while Verizon’s EV-DO covers more than 80% of the US map.

Myth #2: The iPhone 3G is half the price!

Let’s see, the phone costs less, but the service is more expensive. Yep, I think most of us have already realized this by now, but most of the technically-challenged users will probably think that the new iPhone is indeed cheaper. A good selling point for Verizon.

Myth #3: iPhone Data Plan Covers All Data.

Apparently, people selling the iPhone let potential customers presume that the iPhone data plan covers all data, while in reality, it does not. Common seller’s tactic, nothing to say here.

Myth #4: The iPhone 3G Data Plan includes more data at affordable prices.

Again, Verizon says that only Verizon offers true “unlimited” data service.

So, what are your thoughts on this, do you think this document was made up, or is it official? And what about the four myths? Let us know in the comments section below!

[Via Gizmodo]

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16 Responses to Verizon Distributes Anti-iPhone Propaganda to Employees

  1. Myth #1: Not really a myth, just common sense.

    Myth #2: They cut the price, raised the service, and brought it in line with what everyone else in the industry does. The first iPhone was not subsidized and Apple was able to negotiate a better data rate than other phones on AT&T's network, the iPhone 3G is subsidized.

    Myth #3: Turn-by-turn directions are a data feature? The data plan does cover all data. MMS isn't supported yet by the phone, but that's probably coming soon. Turn-by-turn directions will probably come from either Garmin or Tomtom, companies that I'm sure will do a better job than anything Verizon has to offer. The iTunes Store only works over WiFi because the record companies want more money for songs delivered over cellular networks. How much does it cost to by a song on Verizon vs. iTS? My understanding is that on Verizon you could be paying up to $3 per track, vs. the $1 from iTunes.

    Myth #4: They're right, the lack of any text messages blows. AT&T also doesn't offer anything inbetween the 200 messages for $5 which is way too few, and 1500 for $15 which is way too many. Saying that the $30 plan offers nothing over the $20 plan is a lie though, the $30 plan gets you 3G service.

  2. Myth #1: Not really a myth, just common sense.

    Myth #2: They cut the price, raised the service, and brought it in line with what everyone else in the industry does. The first iPhone was not subsidized and Apple was able to negotiate a better data rate than other phones on AT&T’s network, the iPhone 3G is subsidized.

    Myth #3: Turn-by-turn directions are a data feature? The data plan does cover all data. MMS isn’t supported yet by the phone, but that’s probably coming soon. Turn-by-turn directions will probably come from either Garmin or Tomtom, companies that I’m sure will do a better job than anything Verizon has to offer. The iTunes Store only works over WiFi because the record companies want more money for songs delivered over cellular networks. How much does it cost to by a song on Verizon vs. iTS? My understanding is that on Verizon you could be paying up to $3 per track, vs. the $1 from iTunes.

    Myth #4: They’re right, the lack of any text messages blows. AT&T also doesn’t offer anything inbetween the 200 messages for $5 which is way too few, and 1500 for $15 which is way too many. Saying that the $30 plan offers nothing over the $20 plan is a lie though, the $30 plan gets you 3G service.

  3. as to #4… I've looked into the iPhone and the thing that really does suck is that AT&T's unlimited text plan blows as it's too expensive. I'm on a voice plan with VZW right now (and really want a smart phone again) that gives me unlimited texting, but, if I had to pay separate for it, last time I priced out service, it was only like $10 more a month.

    Oh and the other thing VZW doesn't tell you is their T-B-T blows. I'd rather have a true GPS than use VZW Navigator.

    -Adam

  4. as to #4… I’ve looked into the iPhone and the thing that really does suck is that AT&T’s unlimited text plan blows as it’s too expensive. I’m on a voice plan with VZW right now (and really want a smart phone again) that gives me unlimited texting, but, if I had to pay separate for it, last time I priced out service, it was only like $10 more a month.

    Oh and the other thing VZW doesn’t tell you is their T-B-T blows. I’d rather have a true GPS than use VZW Navigator.

    -Adam

  5. As usual with Apple, I think the product is just fine and the marketing is at best misleading. Yes, the service price increase brings it in line with most other 3G services, but it's still a new contract. 1st Gen iPhone owners, for example, will need to enter a new 2-year agreement in order to purchase the 3G iPhone, despite the fact that they are all current AT&T customers. Combine that with the lack of an included text messaging plan, and it's pretty undeniably a price increase, not a price decrease.

    As for whether the document is real or a hoax, I have no problem believing it is real. Some number of VZW customers have undoubtedly come into their Verizon Stores looking to cancel their service so that they can buy a new iPhone. It makes business sense to try to talk them out of it.

  6. As usual with Apple, I think the product is just fine and the marketing is at best misleading. Yes, the service price increase brings it in line with most other 3G services, but it’s still a new contract. 1st Gen iPhone owners, for example, will need to enter a new 2-year agreement in order to purchase the 3G iPhone, despite the fact that they are all current AT&T customers. Combine that with the lack of an included text messaging plan, and it’s pretty undeniably a price increase, not a price decrease.

    As for whether the document is real or a hoax, I have no problem believing it is real. Some number of VZW customers have undoubtedly come into their Verizon Stores looking to cancel their service so that they can buy a new iPhone. It makes business sense to try to talk them out of it.

  7. They're technically right about the first three of the myths, Apple's marketing has been stretching the truth by making these claims, and Verizon is right to call them out on it. I haven't heard the fourth myth before, but I respect that Verizon is showing ways in which they are both better and worse than the iPhone.

    But in the end they're missing the point, as they always do. It doesn't matter how many services you've got or how many features you can tick off in the store if I can't use it when I get home. I've had my LG enV for about a year now and I still haven't been able to get it to successfully play my music files without aggravation. It chokes with mysterious errors on one out of five MP3s or so meaning I have to restart the application and navigate its confusing interface three or four times during my morning run. There are also plenty of other annoyances in how it mysteriously organizes the songs or repeats some albums many times in the album list. Browsing the internet on it means being forced to slowly navigate through Verizon's ad-choked mobile website so I don't bother unless I absolutely need to look something up. And they nickel-and-dime you to death with every application, most of which cost a few bucks every month. It might not seem like a lot but it certainly adds up and it makes me a lot less likely to try things out because I worry that somehow I could be incurring extra cost by using some feature. Having gone to graduate school for computer science and interface design I can absolutely say I would not have been able to pass even mid-level classes with some of the poorly-conceived and laid out interfaces they've got. I feel bad for the designers there who obviously play second-fiddle to the marketing suits. I'm not about to run out and buy an iPhone, but I do hope it forces Verizon to pay some attention to their user experience. Because what the iPhone really has going for it is that it feels like it's working for you, not for your wireless carrier.

  8. They’re technically right about the first three of the myths, Apple’s marketing has been stretching the truth by making these claims, and Verizon is right to call them out on it. I haven’t heard the fourth myth before, but I respect that Verizon is showing ways in which they are both better and worse than the iPhone.

    But in the end they’re missing the point, as they always do. It doesn’t matter how many services you’ve got or how many features you can tick off in the store if I can’t use it when I get home. I’ve had my LG enV for about a year now and I still haven’t been able to get it to successfully play my music files without aggravation. It chokes with mysterious errors on one out of five MP3s or so meaning I have to restart the application and navigate its confusing interface three or four times during my morning run. There are also plenty of other annoyances in how it mysteriously organizes the songs or repeats some albums many times in the album list. Browsing the internet on it means being forced to slowly navigate through Verizon’s ad-choked mobile website so I don’t bother unless I absolutely need to look something up. And they nickel-and-dime you to death with every application, most of which cost a few bucks every month. It might not seem like a lot but it certainly adds up and it makes me a lot less likely to try things out because I worry that somehow I could be incurring extra cost by using some feature. Having gone to graduate school for computer science and interface design I can absolutely say I would not have been able to pass even mid-level classes with some of the poorly-conceived and laid out interfaces they’ve got. I feel bad for the designers there who obviously play second-fiddle to the marketing suits. I’m not about to run out and buy an iPhone, but I do hope it forces Verizon to pay some attention to their user experience. Because what the iPhone really has going for it is that it feels like it’s working for you, not for your wireless carrier.

  9. The more economically-troubled readers might think the iPhone+service costs more. It doesn't. Adjust for inflation and they actually lose money by keeping the fixed figure over a longer period of time.

  10. The more economically-troubled readers might think the iPhone+service costs more. It doesn’t. Adjust for inflation and they actually lose money by keeping the fixed figure over a longer period of time.

  11. blah blah blah, everyone here is just upset because they don't own an iPhone. It destroys the competition out there, yes it costs more, so do high end sports cars, because they're better.

    The only company even coming remotely close in product completeness like Apple (even though the iPhone is purportedly half baked) is HTC, their shit's hideously expensive too.

    For $200.00, I have a device which has replaced 80% of my computing use. $30.00 a month is a pittance for the convenience. I spend more money on personal hygiene per month than my mobile data plan.

    Since I'm flame baiting, let's talk about Verizon. First off their ad campaigns leave a lot to be desired for, like originality, the Verizon guy is no longer cool (not that he ever was), let's face it… the slightly wanna-be hipster emo IT guy is a loser, the company he represents is running on an old network which has been upgraded more times than Joan River's face.

    The topic of this article up top is a farce, if Verizon was going to bash the iPhone, they would have done so in a 10 page employee handout covered with the Verizon logo. Not pseudo-efficiently in a one page looking like my 4 year old did the formatting. This is the work of a zealous employee working for an agent who sells Verizon phones. This is also worth no ones time.

    Have a nice day.

  12. blah blah blah, everyone here is just upset because they don’t own an iPhone. It destroys the competition out there, yes it costs more, so do high end sports cars, because they’re better.

    The only company even coming remotely close in product completeness like Apple (even though the iPhone is purportedly half baked) is HTC, their shit’s hideously expensive too.

    For $200.00, I have a device which has replaced 80% of my computing use. $30.00 a month is a pittance for the convenience. I spend more money on personal hygiene per month than my mobile data plan.

    Since I’m flame baiting, let’s talk about Verizon. First off their ad campaigns leave a lot to be desired for, like originality, the Verizon guy is no longer cool (not that he ever was), let’s face it… the slightly wanna-be hipster emo IT guy is a loser, the company he represents is running on an old network which has been upgraded more times than Joan River’s face.

    The topic of this article up top is a farce, if Verizon was going to bash the iPhone, they would have done so in a 10 page employee handout covered with the Verizon logo. Not pseudo-efficiently in a one page looking like my 4 year old did the formatting. This is the work of a zealous employee working for an agent who sells Verizon phones. This is also worth no ones time.

    Have a nice day.

  13. In the interests of full disclosure, I work for Verizon. Specifically, Verizon Business. And I don't feel obligated to shill for Verizon Wireless, especially considering that the employee discount they give to those of us not in their business unit is shockingly lame.

    Having said that, you folks should know that what you're looking at is nothing more than a salesman's cheat sheet.

    V.W. is in the business of selling wireless access. OF COURSE they want to try to anticipate questions/objections that potential customers might raise, in order to make a sale.

    And looking at that cheat sheet, it certainly appears that it's all TRUE, although I have not fact checked it, don't know when it was published and am fully aware that things change.

    Look, the point I'm making is simple.

    EVERYTHING ISN'T SOME EVIL CONSPIRACY TO SCREW YOU.

    Don't mistake a sales tool for a nefarious plot. It makes you look like you should be fitted for a tinfoil hat.

  14. In the interests of full disclosure, I work for Verizon. Specifically, Verizon Business. And I don’t feel obligated to shill for Verizon Wireless, especially considering that the employee discount they give to those of us not in their business unit is shockingly lame.

    Having said that, you folks should know that what you’re looking at is nothing more than a salesman’s cheat sheet.
    V.W. is in the business of selling wireless access. OF COURSE they want to try to anticipate questions/objections that potential customers might raise, in order to make a sale.
    And looking at that cheat sheet, it certainly appears that it’s all TRUE, although I have not fact checked it, don’t know when it was published and am fully aware that things change.

    Look, the point I’m making is simple.
    EVERYTHING ISN’T SOME EVIL CONSPIRACY TO SCREW YOU.

    Don’t mistake a sales tool for a nefarious plot. It makes you look like you should be fitted for a tinfoil hat.