Play my DVD’s Obi-Wan! You’re my only hope!

By Mark O’Neill

I’ve just seen something seriously cool on the German TV news about the Nuernberg Toy Fair. A company called Nikko has made and released a 6.5 meter model of R2-D2 which can be used as a movie projector, CD player and iPod player.

Remember the scene in Star Wars when R2 plays the holographic message of Princess Leia to Obi-Wan? Well for the bargain basement price of $2,500 (a steal!), you can have your own R2 unit projecting your DVD movies onto your own cinema screen.   I can’t say how good the picture quality is but for $2,500, you can be reasonably sure that it is at least decent quality.

Or alternatively you can play your music CD’s or your IPod music on Artoo’s “integrated 20W speakers”. You can even project your digital photos directly from a USB stick or memory card plugged into one of the robot’s sockets.

The R2 unit can be moved backwards and forwards by controls embedded inside a Millenium Falcon model. So after playing your movies, you can send it off to the kitchen with a tray on its head to serve drinks on your barge.

Below is a YouTube video of the Artoo model when it appeared at the CES in Las Vegas recently.  Nothing really exciting in the video – just it scooting around doing its beeping act.   But it gives you an idea of how it looks and how mobile it is.

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11 Responses to Play my DVD’s Obi-Wan! You’re my only hope!

  1. For a moment there, I thought the R2 unit was 6.5 meters tall. Ah, but no, it is the size of the projection. And, wow! The stylish Millenium Falcon remote even lights up. I won’t go as far as saying this is a must-have, but for the wealthier geeks among us, the R2 projector might make a fine addition to one’s playroom.

    PS: Mark, just a friendly style/punctuation note: you don’t need apostrophes to make plurals of DVD and CD — “DVDs” and “CDs” is proper. (The same goes for other acronyms and for numbers, e.g. 30s, 1920s, et al.)

    • Maybe that’s US English but in Britain, I was always told by my English teacher that plural forms always have an apostrophe before the last ‘s’ to signify the fact that it is a plural form.

      • Mark, I live in Britain, too. "DVDs" is correct here in Ol' Blighty as well as the across the pond. Your teacher probably misinformed you. (Although I am aware that some old-school people suggest adding an apostrophe if there is any chance of confusion. Good examples would be "A's" instead of "As" so not to be confused with the word "as", or 1's instead of 1s, so not to be confused with "is". Neverthless, context dictates when these should be used, if ever. The rule is "use apostrophes for possesives but not for plurals".

        But don't take my word for it if you don't want to. Have a look at these:

        First, I would highly recommend reading Lynne Truss's Eats, Shoots & Leaves "The Zero Tolerance Approach to Punctuation". (If you live in London, I'll meet you in a pub and let you take a gander at it, and might even let you borrow it, so long as you promise to return it.) It's probably the best little book on modern punctuation ever. It's also funny. Definitely worth every penny.

        Second, consider downloading the Guardian's free PDF on style, which you can get here: http://image.guardian.co.uk/sys-files/Guardian/do
        Specifically, have a look at page 22 on apostrophes. This is also a very handy guide if you're ever in doubt about how something should be written. Just have a poke around and see how the plurals are written for numbers and acronyms.

        Here's a recent headline from the BBC website: "Malaysia MP quits over sex DVDs". Link here: http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/world/asia-pacific/716

        If you're a fan (or not) of Wikipedia, you could check out its Style Guide, which says:

        "Plural and possessive forms

        Acronyms and initialisms are pluralized by adding -s or -es as with any other nouns (They produced three CD-ROMs in the first year; The laptops were produced with three different BIOSes in 2006). As with other nouns, no apostrophe is used unless the form is a possessive."

        link to above: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikipedia:Manual_of_

        Anyway, I used to work as a editor for a fiction magazine, and I also write fiction. The hardest thing we have to deal with is criticism from others about our own writing. It's even harder when someone like me points it out in a public forum such as this. I've been there, believe me. I've had my work ripped to shreds again and again on several writing sites, and not just over style and punctuation. Moreover, we all mistakes — we are all far from perfect, which is why we have editors and copy writers and friends (and readers of geeky blogs) to point out the things we didn't know or forgot. My earlier post wasn't meant to be snarky or impolite, nor is this one.

        • Hi

          Thanks for the long comment! I’m not offended in the slightest – I guess we all have our different ways of saying things and different teachers have different viewpoints and different teaching methods. The guy who runs GAS (and my other clients) get exasperated sometimes when I do a double spacing after a full stop and one space after a comma – yet that is the way I was taught at school for approx. 12 years!

          As my best friend here in Germany likes to say often – “even a native speaker can’t speak their language properly” – as in, everyone has their rules, their favourite slang words, their lazy shortcuts. We are all different – and that’s what makes the world interesting.

  2. For a moment there, I thought the R2 unit was 6.5 meters tall. Ah, but no, it is the size of the projection. And, wow! The stylish Millenium Falcon remote even lights up. I won't go as far as saying this is a must-have, but for the wealthier geeks among us, the R2 projector might make a fine addition to one's playroom.

    PS: Mark, just a friendly style/punctuation note: you don't need apostrophes to make plurals of DVD and CD — "DVDs" and "CDs" is proper. (The same goes for other acronyms and for numbers, e.g. 30s, 1920s, et al.)

    • Maybe that's US English but in Britain, I was always told by my English teacher that plural forms always have an apostrophe before the last 's' to signify the fact that it is a plural form.

      • Mark, I live in Britain, too. "DVDs" is correct here in Ol' Blighty as well as the across the pond. Your teacher probably misinformed you. (Although I am aware that some old-school people suggest adding an apostrophe if there is any chance of confusion. Good examples would be "A's" instead of "As" so not to be confused with the word "as", or 1's instead of 1s, so not to be confused with "is". Neverthless, context dictates when these should be used, if ever. The rule is "use apostrophes for possesives but not for plurals".

        But don't take my word for it if you don't want to. Have a look at these:

        First, I would highly recommend reading Lynne Truss's Eats, Shoots & Leaves "The Zero Tolerance Approach to Punctuation". (If you live in London, I'll meet you in a pub and let you take a gander at it, and might even let you borrow it, so long as you promise to return it.) It's probably the best little book on modern punctuation ever. It's also funny. Definitely worth every penny.

        Second, consider downloading the Guardian's free PDF on style, which you can get here: http://image.guardian.co.uk/sys-files/Guardian/do
        Specifically, have a look at page 22 on apostrophes. This is also a very handy guide if you're ever in doubt about how something should be written. Just have a poke around and see how the plurals are written for numbers and acronyms.

        Here's a recent headline from the BBC website: "Malaysia MP quits over sex DVDs". Link here: http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/world/asia-pacific/716

        If you're a fan (or not) of Wikipedia, you could check out its Style Guide, which says:

        "Plural and possessive forms

        Acronyms and initialisms are pluralized by adding -s or -es as with any other nouns (They produced three CD-ROMs in the first year; The laptops were produced with three different BIOSes in 2006). As with other nouns, no apostrophe is used unless the form is a possessive."

        link to above: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikipedia:Manual_of_

        Anyway, I used to work as a editor for a fiction magazine, and I also write fiction. The hardest thing we have to deal with is criticism from others about our own writing. It's even harder when someone like me points it out in a public forum such as this. I've been there, believe me. I've had my work ripped to shreds again and again on several writing sites, and not just over style and punctuation. Moreover, we all mistakes — we are all far from perfect, which is why we have editors and copy writers and friends (and readers of geeky blogs) to point out the things we didn't know or forgot. My earlier post wasn't meant to be snarky or impolite, nor is this one.

        • Hi

          Thanks for the long comment! I'm not offended in the slightest – I guess we all have our different ways of saying things and different teachers have different viewpoints and different teaching methods. The guy who runs GAS (and my other clients) get exasperated sometimes when I do a double spacing after a full stop and one space after a comma – yet that is the way I was taught at school for approx. 12 years!

          As my best friend here in Germany likes to say often – "even a native speaker can't speak their language properly" – as in, everyone has their rules, their favourite slang words, their lazy shortcuts. We are all different – and that's what makes the world interesting.

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