The Future of Books : The Amazon Kindle

In the following video, Jeff Bezos presents the Kindle, Amazon’s new wireless reading device that lets you read books, magazines, newspapers and blogs, anywhere, anytime. The Kindle features a 6-inch 800X600 screen, 256MB of internal storage and weights only 10.2 ounces.

Amazon Kindle technical specifications:

  • Display: 6″ Diagonal eleptrophoretic display
  • Size: 4.9 inches by 7.5 inches by 0.7 inches
  • Weight: 10.2 ounces
  • Storage: 256MB
  • Expansion: SD Slot
  • Audio: 3.5mm stereo headphone jack + built-in speaker
  • Power: AC Adapter + Rechargeable lithium polymer battery
  • Connectivity: USB 2.0, EVDO/CDMA wireless modem
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16 Responses to The Future of Books : The Amazon Kindle

    • Well, books are on average $9.99… and the device connects via EVDO for free, so you have access to all titles, all the time. This could be nice for people on the road..

  1. Hmm, I'm not sure If I like the fact that the Kindle is in black and white… and having to read on a grey-ish background doesn't sound very pleasing to me.

    Anyone else feels like expressing their thoughts on Amazon's "e-reader"?

    • Well, books are on average $9.99… and the device connects via EVDO for free, so you have access to all titles, all the time. This could be nice for people on the road..

  2. Hmm, I’m not sure If I like the fact that the Kindle is in black and white… and having to read on a grey-ish background doesn’t sound very pleasing to me.

    Anyone else feels like expressing their thoughts on Amazon’s “e-reader”?

  3. I like to share and borrow books.

    You may not sell, rent, lease, distribute, broadcast, sublicense or otherwise assign any rights to the Digital Content or any portion of it to any third party, and you may not remove any proprietary notices or labels on the Digital Content. In addition, you may not, and you will not encourage, assist or authorize any other person to, bypass, modify, defeat or circumvent security features that protect the Digital Content.

    Amazon, Kindle Terms of Service

    • Good point. I have to admit that passing a book around to friends is one of the most interesting point of buying them in the first place…

  4. I like to share and borrow books.

    You may not sell, rent, lease, distribute, broadcast, sublicense or otherwise assign any rights to the Digital Content or any portion of it to any third party, and you may not remove any proprietary notices or labels on the Digital Content. In addition, you may not, and you will not encourage, assist or authorize any other person to, bypass, modify, defeat or circumvent security features that protect the Digital Content.

    Amazon, Kindle Terms of Service

    • Good point. I have to admit that passing a book around to friends is one of the most interesting point of buying them in the first place…

  5. Not bothered at all with the screen, but only having the video to go by, I have to wonder how comfortable it is to use. The page turning buttons are massive, running down along the sides of the unit. Those buttons seem to have a long (or deep) throw, so perhaps accidental page turning won’t occur if the unit is held by its sides. (The guy in the video holds the bottom edge of the Kindle when using it.) Hard to say. Moreover, there doesn’t seem to be any good place to rest your thumbs — you get about three-quarters of an inch just above the miniature keyboard. That assumes you hold it as shown.

    But the Kindle looks like it’s trying too hard. Why does everything these days have to do 50 different things? Can it not just do one thing really well? I actually love reading e-books on my Palm, with it’s tiny, tiny screen, because I don’t need to carry around heavy books. And I’ve been gagging for a decent, lightweight, book-sized reader for years. Yet the Kindle (daft name, by the way — let’s light thing on fire) doesn’t appeal. It’s ugly (white plastic? gah! how much dirt is that going to show after a week or two of use?), and the interface looks fiddly — scroll up to the line you want crap. And what do I need a keyboard for when I’m reading a book? Does every one of my gadgets need wi-fi and internet access and a keyboard?

    Furthermore, the e-books are too expensive considering the it costs next to nothing to produce to an e-book these days. Amazon obviously needs to cover the cost of their Whispernet™ tech, on-line storage, and delivery scheme. Still, they’re selling the kindle for $400. Sorry, but it costs less to get a PDA, which gives users more value for their money (despite my earlier comment about wanting things that do just one thing very well).

    As for the points made above regarding not be able to share digital files, yeah, I agree. It’s legal to give away printed material, or resell it, or even let someone borrow it (same with CDs, DVDs, videos, kitchen appliances, pets, what have you). For some paranoid reason, no one is allowed to do that with most digital content. It’s a big pile of bollocks, and perhaps is the Kindle. But I can’t say for sure without getting my hands on one.

  6. Not bothered at all with the screen, but only having the video to go by, I have to wonder how comfortable it is to use. The page turning buttons are massive, running down along the sides of the unit. Those buttons seem to have a long (or deep) throw, so perhaps accidental page turning won't occur if the unit is held by its sides. (The guy in the video holds the bottom edge of the Kindle when using it.) Hard to say. Moreover, there doesn't seem to be any good place to rest your thumbs — you get about three-quarters of an inch just above the miniature keyboard. That assumes you hold it as shown.

    But the Kindle looks like it's trying too hard. Why does everything these days have to do 50 different things? Can it not just do one thing really well? I actually love reading e-books on my Palm, with it's tiny, tiny screen, because I don't need to carry around heavy books. And I've been gagging for a decent, lightweight, book-sized reader for years. Yet the Kindle (daft name, by the way — let's light thing on fire) doesn't appeal. It's ugly (white plastic? gah! how much dirt is that going to show after a week or two of use?), and the interface looks fiddly — scroll up to the line you want crap. And what do I need a keyboard for when I'm reading a book? Does every one of my gadgets need wi-fi and internet access and a keyboard?

    Furthermore, the e-books are too expensive considering the it costs next to nothing to produce to an e-book these days. Amazon obviously needs to cover the cost of their Whispernet™ tech, on-line storage, and delivery scheme. Still, they're selling the kindle for $400. Sorry, but it costs less to get a PDA, which gives users more value for their money (despite my earlier comment about wanting things that do just one thing very well).

    As for the points made above regarding not be able to share digital files, yeah, I agree. It's legal to give away printed material, or resell it, or even let someone borrow it (same with CDs, DVDs, videos, kitchen appliances, pets, what have you). For some paranoid reason, no one is allowed to do that with most digital content. It's a big pile of bollocks, and perhaps is the Kindle. But I can't say for sure without getting my hands on one.

  7. The concept of having all the books you want in the size of a single book seems good, but the thing about this device that I don’t like is the fact that you can’t know for sure (without having a printed copy of the book you bought online) is if the device will/won’t have some sort of built-in capality of modifying, or blocking “censored” books on-the-fly without the users knowledge/consent. This capality if present will surelly make the device (since this stuff is supposed to totally replace old printed books) do the functions of the “ministry of truth” (novel 1984 by george orwell).

  8. The concept of having all the books you want in the size of a single book seems good, but the thing about this device that I don't like is the fact that you can't know for sure (without having a printed copy of the book you bought online) is if the device will/won't have some sort of built-in capality of modifying, or blocking "censored" books on-the-fly without the users knowledge/consent. This capality if present will surelly make the device (since this stuff is supposed to totally replace old printed books) do the functions of the "ministry of truth" (novel 1984 by george orwell).