Nanosolar PowerSheets

By David Peralty
Contributing Writer, [GAS]

Nanosolar PowerSheetsI am a huge solar technology fan as I have mentioned before and so nothing makes me happier than to see new technology being developed to make solar power cheaper, more efficient, and more practical.

Winning the Green Tech Grand Award and “Innovation of the Year” from Popular Science, the Nanosolar PowerSheets is a technology that allows thin, bendable, and inexpensive solar technology. The PowerSheets are ten times more efficient in cost per watt than current alternatives, and doesn’t rely on silicon or glass.

From Popular Science:

Imagine a solar panel without the panel. Just a coating, thin as a layer of paint, that takes light and converts it to electricity. From there, you can picture roof shingles with solar cells built inside and window coatings that seem to suck power from the air.

This is the type of technology that I have been waiting for. Something that I could coat the exterior of my laptop, and have it contribute to recharging the machine when I am on the go. A development in solar technology that would allow my next house to reduce its dependancy on our current power grid. It looks like the Nanosolar PowerSheets could be a huge step towards that goal.

If you want to learn more about this technology, and how it works, check out Popular Science’s website. Consider me very excited though.

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12 Responses to Nanosolar PowerSheets

  1. Cool! – it’ll be interesting to see what tech’s emerge as the one’s that we actually use. I found a site a while back that was talking about vertical maglev windmills, I just went to check back there but you need to make a special request for a username and password to get into the site now ??

  2. Cool! – it'll be interesting to see what tech's emerge as the one's that we actually use. I found a site a while back that was talking about vertical maglev windmills, I just went to check back there but you need to make a special request for a username and password to get into the site now ??

  3. Ditto here! I’d love some reasonably affordable way to add solar collectors to the back half of our home’s roof – it’s southward facing, not viewable from the street (so even a little added bulk wouldn’t affect the curb appeal), and we get truckloads of blistering sun here in West Texas even well into the Fall season.

    Wonder how long it’ll take for this type of produc to make it from the labs to the consumers?

    • How is this product installed on a roof? If it is attached to a metal roof would not a heat increase be realized? How would you plan the electrical connection from the sheets to the inverter box?

  4. Ditto here! I'd love some reasonably affordable way to add solar collectors to the back half of our home's roof – it's southward facing, not viewable from the street (so even a little added bulk wouldn't affect the curb appeal), and we get truckloads of blistering sun here in West Texas even well into the Fall season.

    Wonder how long it'll take for this type of produc to make it from the labs to the consumers?

    • How is this product installed on a roof? If it is attached to a metal roof would not a heat increase be realized? How would you plan the electrical connection from the sheets to the inverter box?

  5. It’s also very interesting that the Google founders are bankrolling this new technology. Since they are probably paying big bucks to power their server farms, it seems a natural fit.

    I think that big changes for the better are finally coming.

  6. It's also very interesting that the Google founders are bankrolling this new technology. Since they are probably paying big bucks to power their server farms, it seems a natural fit.

    I think that big changes for the better are finally coming.