When DRM Goes Bad, on a Great Game

By Fred Roth
Contributing writer, [GAS] 

So by now, most of us have either wasted significant amounts of moisture drooling over reviews, screenshots and the recently released demo of Bioshock. Some may even have already purchased it. However, I’m sure most of you are unaware of the DRM constraints of the game.

BioshockAT Bioshock’s release, 2K Games had limited users to only two installs on two different computers, and only two users could use the game on each system. When asked about it, their initial response was to “go buy another copy.” As they claimed you paid for the game, but the rest of the family did not.

Wow.

But to give credit where credit is due, 2K has recently changed their policy. You can now install Bioshock on up to 5 computers, and each computer can have up to 5 users with an installed copy of the game. It’s good to see a company that finally listens to its customers and is willing to adjust its DRM policies accordingly.

Now, if only we could see more headway made in terms of DRM-less Music!!

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6 Responses to When DRM Goes Bad, on a Great Game

  1. Still rather crappy that they use DRM at all, but at least they lightened up. 100% agreed on music though. I got a Defective By Design sticker from a friend on my birthday. When I showed another friend, he read "iPod plus iTunes plus D-R-M…what's DRM?" When I said "you know how you can buy songs from iTunes Music Store but they don't work on your mp3 player if it's not an iPod?" and he goes "oh yeah that sucks" I'm like "that's DRM." Gotta get more people educated on that.

  2. Still rather crappy that they use DRM at all, but at least they lightened up. 100% agreed on music though. I got a Defective By Design sticker from a friend on my birthday. When I showed another friend, he read “iPod plus iTunes plus D-R-M…what’s DRM?” When I said “you know how you can buy songs from iTunes Music Store but they don’t work on your mp3 player if it’s not an iPod?” and he goes “oh yeah that sucks” I’m like “that’s DRM.” Gotta get more people educated on that.

  3. THAT is what kills me the most. While these companies unnecessarily limit the fair use of their products, many consumers sit there and don't even know it until it is too late.

    A good example is when I get a customer that comes in to buy some DVD-R's with the idea that they will back up their DVD collection.

    When I tell them that it's probably not going to work for most of their movies, they're shocked. After all, fair use dictates that you can make backups of movies/music/anything you purchase. Yet it's illegal to circumvent electronic encryptions.

  4. THAT is what kills me the most. While these companies unnecessarily limit the fair use of their products, many consumers sit there and don’t even know it until it is too late.
    A good example is when I get a customer that comes in to buy some DVD-R’s with the idea that they will back up their DVD collection.
    When I tell them that it’s probably not going to work for most of their movies, they’re shocked. After all, fair use dictates that you can make backups of movies/music/anything you purchase. Yet it’s illegal to circumvent electronic encryptions.

  5. I bought a copy of Oblivion because I wanted to play it and it had no DRM. I downloaded a pirated copy of BioShock because I wanted to play it and it has overly restrictive DRM.

  6. I bought a copy of Oblivion because I wanted to play it and it had no DRM. I downloaded a pirated copy of BioShock because I wanted to play it and it has overly restrictive DRM.