Now that the iPhone is here, what do you think?

By Rob Dunn
Contributing Writer, [GAS]

Now that “the day” has come and gone, what do you have to say about the iPhone?

Of course, amongst the build-up of the iPhone’s technical details and rumored features, there has been a lot of folks condemning some of the iPhone’s shortcomings:

  • no removable battery
  • no memory slot
  • lack of developer SDK
  • no custom ringtones
  • etc.

iPhone on display

Shortcomings aside, there are certainly reasons to have an iPhone; being the king of the gadget-pile is definitely one of them.

So, what now? Aside from some initial activation issues (to be expected with so many units going to the consumer at the same time), what about customer response now that the phone has been released to the masses?

Now for some feedback: Is the iPhone really living up to the hype? Did you buy one? If so, are you replacing an existing smartphone and what do you think of the iPhone so far?

Me? I’m heading off to eBay to find all the new listings for BlackBerry 8800’s and Treo 780’s.

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10 Responses to Now that the iPhone is here, what do you think?

  1. One big missing feature for me is no SD card slot. I take a lot of pictures with my point and shoot digital camera where I want to immediately publish them to the web using email from my Treo. That's out if I switch to the iPhone, or I'm forced to rely on the iPhone's camera rather than a Canon SD800.

  2. One big missing feature for me is no SD card slot. I take a lot of pictures with my point and shoot digital camera where I want to immediately publish them to the web using email from my Treo. That’s out if I switch to the iPhone, or I’m forced to rely on the iPhone’s camera rather than a Canon SD800.

  3. I think this phone is the representation of the jungle war. This product, despite the fact that it misses many features, was 100% sold even before it was produced in mass.

    People should be more selective in the future. Let's see the year-end sales numbers.

  4. I think this phone is the representation of the jungle war. This product, despite the fact that it misses many features, was 100% sold even before it was produced in mass.

    People should be more selective in the future. Let’s see the year-end sales numbers.

  5. The biggest shortcoming for me is the presence of a touchscreen. So many people consider that a feature, it's ridiculous. You can't have a phone with a touchscreen and no voice-dialing. It makes no sense. You have to look away from the road the dial. That's very dangerous. Phones MUST have buttons. And they can't be lame buttons like on a Razr (flat metal plates that give no feedback as to whether they've been pressed or not and which also lack edge definition to find the proper button). You should be able to feel around and tell what button you're on by the fact that you just felt a new button move under your finger because it has distinct edges or is raised above the level of the rest of the phone. You should be able to press the button and KNOW it was pressed and KNOW how many times it was pressed without looking. Any phone that does not fulfill those two requirements is a piece of junk. I'm sure the iPhone would make a nice PDA, but a real phone would still be necessary.

    • I agree – I NEED a keypad to effectively type out an email, so I know that this will appeal mainly to the entertainment needs of the non-business crowd.

      Also, the optical glass on the front of the device is begging to be broken, and I would guess that this won't be cheap down the road (I heard of one guy already that broke his and Apple replaced it, no questions asked, but I don't know if they can expect to do this indefinitely).

      Haptic feedback really is a must, so I would expect that this will be something they might work on for future versions, but how they will do it without removing current features is anyone's guess.

  6. The biggest shortcoming for me is the presence of a touchscreen. So many people consider that a feature, it’s ridiculous. You can’t have a phone with a touchscreen and no voice-dialing. It makes no sense. You have to look away from the road the dial. That’s very dangerous. Phones MUST have buttons. And they can’t be lame buttons like on a Razr (flat metal plates that give no feedback as to whether they’ve been pressed or not and which also lack edge definition to find the proper button). You should be able to feel around and tell what button you’re on by the fact that you just felt a new button move under your finger because it has distinct edges or is raised above the level of the rest of the phone. You should be able to press the button and KNOW it was pressed and KNOW how many times it was pressed without looking. Any phone that does not fulfill those two requirements is a piece of junk. I’m sure the iPhone would make a nice PDA, but a real phone would still be necessary.

    • I agree – I NEED a keypad to effectively type out an email, so I know that this will appeal mainly to the entertainment needs of the non-business crowd.

      Also, the optical glass on the front of the device is begging to be broken, and I would guess that this won’t be cheap down the road (I heard of one guy already that broke his and Apple replaced it, no questions asked, but I don’t know if they can expect to do this indefinitely).

      Haptic feedback really is a must, so I would expect that this will be something they might work on for future versions, but how they will do it without removing current features is anyone’s guess.

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