Dell finally ships Linux PCs

It’s official: Dell-branded Ubuntu systems are going to be made available for order today in the U.S. by 5pm EST.

Dell XPS 410n

The three systems on offer will be the XPS 410n, the Dimension E520n and the Inspiron E1505n.

The XPS 410n desktop pricing will start at $849 and the dimension E520n and Inpiron e1505n will go for the entry-level price of $599.

So, is anyone here going to order one?

Advertisement





19 Responses to Dell finally ships Linux PCs

  1. I'll consider it. I desperately need a new computer, and was really leaning toward getting a laptop, but I will consider it.

  2. I’ll consider it. I desperately need a new computer, and was really leaning toward getting a laptop, but I will consider it.

  3. No, I don't think I'll get one of these. I happily (and daily) use Ubuntu s a server OS on an old Gateway, but I don't know what I'll ever be fully comfortable with Linux on the desktop.

    I'm waiting for OS X 10.5 to come out, then I'll replace my three-year-old Powerbook with a new Mac laptop.

  4. No, I don’t think I’ll get one of these. I happily (and daily) use Ubuntu s a server OS on an old Gateway, but I don’t know what I’ll ever be fully comfortable with Linux on the desktop.

    I’m waiting for OS X 10.5 to come out, then I’ll replace my three-year-old Powerbook with a new Mac laptop.

  5. My buddy is waiting for the new OS X 10.5 to come out…as for me, I am really just waiting to have enough money to buy a computer…now its just all research. The new Dell computers don't look that bad…I probably wouldn't buy them though.

  6. My buddy is waiting for the new OS X 10.5 to come out…as for me, I am really just waiting to have enough money to buy a computer…now its just all research. The new Dell computers don’t look that bad…I probably wouldn’t buy them though.

  7. I don't understand what took Dell so long to start shipping desktop systems with Linux installed since they've been selling servers with Linux for years.

    • I think they had some kind of deal with Microsoft about having Windows installed exclusively on their systems…

  8. I don’t understand what took Dell so long to start shipping desktop systems with Linux installed since they’ve been selling servers with Linux for years.

    • I think they had some kind of deal with Microsoft about having Windows installed exclusively on their systems…

  9. Yeah OK. Ubuntu based computers sound pretty nice but let's not forget that most buyers don't know anything about computers. For them, even Windows is top notch science. So i doubt Dell will have great sales for their Linux based computers.

    The only advantage i see is that they will be cheaper, as you don't have to pay extra for an OS from Microsoft. Other from that…

    And like someone said before me, it would be quite difficult to do everything you need on Linux, actually quite impossible (Talking from experience…)

    • I don't think Dell is targeting regular computer users with this new line of systems anyways. Doing this was one of the best move they ever did in my own opinion.

      This simple change brought them tons of positive media coverage, so even if they only sell a small amount of linux boxes, it will be all worth it in the end.

    • If it's so impossible to do everything you need in Linux, how have I survived the last 10 months (never used Linux before I put it on my brand-new, never-booted-into-Windows laptop in July)? The only computer I use is my laptop. It ran Ubuntu exclusively for about 6 months, then I added Fedora and Sabayon to try them out. Now it's Ubuntu and Debian (just installed today). My computer-illiterate mom has used Ubuntu for the last 6 months. She Googles, emails, and does spreadsheets for work. When's the last time you tried Linux on the desktop? Surf the web? Firefox. IM? Gaim/Pidgin. Office stuff? OOo. Email? Evolution or Thunderbird. Accounting? GnuCash or KMyMoney. CAD? There's a huge list, but QCad is nice, I've heard. Graphics? GIMP. Music? BMP, XMMS, Banshee, Amarok…tons of them. Organize photos? F-Spot, Picasa, or gThumb. Music editing? Ubuntustudio has a bunch of that stuff, but I don't know specific program names as I don't use it. Genealogy? GRAMPS. iPod? Amarok. "Windows only" portable digital media players? Gnomad2. Sync your Palm Pilot or use Bluetooth? Yep, those are supported too, but are another "I don't use it so I forget the name" thing.

      Really, Ubuntu is a LOT easier for computer-newbs than Windows is. The biggest thing for my mom was the default arrangement of the GNOME Menu. Things divide, automatically, by type-of-program. That makes sense. The Windows Start Menu goes by vendor. I don't really understand how anyone could expect Random Person X to know whether "the thing to type letters" is made by Broderbund, Microsoft, Blizzard, or Intuit. The Start Menu is really unintuitive. Another thing is installing programs. The GNOME Menu has an option that says "Add/Remove" and if you click on it, it gives a list of programs and checkboxes. Everything downloads and installs itself instead of you having to find it somewhere online. Dependencies are handled automatically. Updates don't require reboots. Plug anything in, it mounts and shows an icon on the desktop automatically (instead of having to go into "My Computer" and find "the letter that wasn't there before").

      I won't be getting one since my laptop's less than a year old. I'm thinking I'll recommend it for my mom's friend though. She needs a new computer badly, and this would save her a ton of money on the system and on anti-virus junk. Might also have my dad get one. His computers max out at 384 and 512 mb. Not much life left in the Pentium 2 either, unless I put Debian & IceWM on it, and even then who knows about the hardware's lifespan?

  10. Yeah OK. Ubuntu based computers sound pretty nice but let’s not forget that most buyers don’t know anything about computers. For them, even Windows is top notch science. So i doubt Dell will have great sales for their Linux based computers.

    The only advantage i see is that they will be cheaper, as you don’t have to pay extra for an OS from Microsoft. Other from that…

    And like someone said before me, it would be quite difficult to do everything you need on Linux, actually quite impossible (Talking from experience…)

    • I don’t think Dell is targeting regular computer users with this new line of systems anyways. Doing this was one of the best move they ever did in my own opinion.

      This simple change brought them tons of positive media coverage, so even if they only sell a small amount of linux boxes, it will be all worth it in the end.

    • If it’s so impossible to do everything you need in Linux, how have I survived the last 10 months (never used Linux before I put it on my brand-new, never-booted-into-Windows laptop in July)? The only computer I use is my laptop. It ran Ubuntu exclusively for about 6 months, then I added Fedora and Sabayon to try them out. Now it’s Ubuntu and Debian (just installed today). My computer-illiterate mom has used Ubuntu for the last 6 months. She Googles, emails, and does spreadsheets for work. When’s the last time you tried Linux on the desktop? Surf the web? Firefox. IM? Gaim/Pidgin. Office stuff? OOo. Email? Evolution or Thunderbird. Accounting? GnuCash or KMyMoney. CAD? There’s a huge list, but QCad is nice, I’ve heard. Graphics? GIMP. Music? BMP, XMMS, Banshee, Amarok…tons of them. Organize photos? F-Spot, Picasa, or gThumb. Music editing? Ubuntustudio has a bunch of that stuff, but I don’t know specific program names as I don’t use it. Genealogy? GRAMPS. iPod? Amarok. “Windows only” portable digital media players? Gnomad2. Sync your Palm Pilot or use Bluetooth? Yep, those are supported too, but are another “I don’t use it so I forget the name” thing.

      Really, Ubuntu is a LOT easier for computer-newbs than Windows is. The biggest thing for my mom was the default arrangement of the GNOME Menu. Things divide, automatically, by type-of-program. That makes sense. The Windows Start Menu goes by vendor. I don’t really understand how anyone could expect Random Person X to know whether “the thing to type letters” is made by Broderbund, Microsoft, Blizzard, or Intuit. The Start Menu is really unintuitive. Another thing is installing programs. The GNOME Menu has an option that says “Add/Remove” and if you click on it, it gives a list of programs and checkboxes. Everything downloads and installs itself instead of you having to find it somewhere online. Dependencies are handled automatically. Updates don’t require reboots. Plug anything in, it mounts and shows an icon on the desktop automatically (instead of having to go into “My Computer” and find “the letter that wasn’t there before”).

      I won’t be getting one since my laptop’s less than a year old. I’m thinking I’ll recommend it for my mom’s friend though. She needs a new computer badly, and this would save her a ton of money on the system and on anti-virus junk. Might also have my dad get one. His computers max out at 384 and 512 mb. Not much life left in the Pentium 2 either, unless I put Debian & IceWM on it, and even then who knows about the hardware’s lifespan?

  11. Woah baby I did not know Dell was going to do this. And at a good price I might as well try it out sometime.

    I agree with Mike a lot of people do not know how to use Linux let alone Windows XP.

  12. Woah baby I did not know Dell was going to do this. And at a good price I might as well try it out sometime.

    I agree with Mike a lot of people do not know how to use Linux let alone Windows XP.

  13. Pingback: Links for 2007-05-26 » anchorite.org