Wireless Charging Laptops by Intel


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Wireless charging was something that was often mentioned in my Electrodynamics lectures, but something that was far from practical yet.

Well Intel is ready to step up and push wireless charging into the future. While wireless charging has been used previously for charging smartphones (to what degree of success, perhaps some of our readers who have used the tech can comment?) but Intel is developing a system that will allow their new Ultrabooks to wirelessly charge on a platform that might even charge both your computer and smartphone at the same time.

Apparently the major selling point is that it will use low power consumption and it’s not too expensive. The engineers at Intel have apparently figured out how to integrate the transmitter and receiver into a single unit (not being an engineer myself, I’m not quite sure how significant this is, but it sounds rather compact).

These Ultrabooks are due to launch in the second half of 2013, so it’s some way off yet but that’s not really too far away.

What possibilities could you imagine for this tech? Being a recent student, I’m picturing lecture halls with built-in charging pads on the little desks, so that you can charge your computer as you take notes. Or making it so that under my desk you don’t see a big knot of the millions of cords that stream down towards my power board…I would definitely like to see this tech take off!

What was a cool suggestion from one of my lecturers when discussing wireless charging a few years ago, was to have an electric car that could wirelessly charge and then have your garage as a giant charging coil that charged your car while you slept at night. That would be cool, if the power required at the moment wasn’t so large that it wouldn’t be worth it. But a cool possibility if we perfect the technology, right? (A quick google search just turned up that the “Infinit Concept” cars are doing wireless charging via a pad!)

[Via Geek.com | Photo Credit]





17 Responses to Wireless Charging Laptops by Intel

  1. Nikola Tesla must be rolling over in his grave. This is not wireless charging. The charging pad still has to be connected to a power source. Wireless charging means my charger is on one side of the room, I'm sitting on the sofa on the other side of the room, and the charger is beaming power to the laptop over the air, just like the signal between my laptop and my wireless router. I really wish the industry would not adopt this incorrect terminology.

  2. It's not wireless charging at all. Its like taking the plating of a charging cord and the plating of the charging port on the laptop. And making it super sized and flat.

  3. What happened to the wireless charging to american companies were researching into it i believe one of them was trying to harness the radio waves as a power medium for TV's,laptops and phones?

    • i think there is a side project in devise a way to protect from stealing energy from other people(as in stealing their electricity for your own use)???

      something like that?

  4. why would inductive charging not be considered 'wireless charging'. there is no wire between the charging pad and the laptop, therefore it's wireless.
    the term isn't tied to a specific procedure or technique. inductive power transfer totally meets the requirements.

  5. While it may not be wireless charging in the more fantastical sense, anything that gets away from power jacks and cords is a good thing. As a computer tech type I've seen people break multiple laptops from fiddlying with power cords and breaking the jack off of the mainboard.

  6. Dell's Latitude Z tried induction charging. I never bought in though because it seemed too good, too early to be true. If anything, Apple will get it out first marketed well so they can say they invented electricity.

  7. I forgot what wireless charging device it was, or maybe multiple ones did it.. but they had bricks available that you could attach, via a short wire, to the charge port of your device. I thought that was the most ridiculous thing ever. What, are you supposed to leave the little brick hanging off your phone all the time? No. You might as well use a regular charger. The actual adapters that become part of the device were available for a very small number of high end devices… but I guess if you wanted such a thing you probably do have those high end devices. I wouldn't buy into the technology until everything has it built in, but someone has to. If you think it's cool and have the exclusive few devices that have proper adapters made for them and money go for it.

  8. They will probably use the witricity technology which was already presented at the Intel IDF some years ago, and also at TED and there is an Apple patent mentioning the technology too. Invented by a MIT professor using coupled magnetic fields to improve wireless energy transfer efficiency.
    http://www.witricity.com/ http://www.ted.com/talks/eric_giler_demos_wireleshttp://www.macrumors.com/2011/07/11/apples-interehttp://newsroom.intel.com/docs/DOC-1119