Introducing the ChromeBook [Video]

Haven’t heard about the ChromeBook yet? Here’s a fun and informative video that will teach you everything you need to know about the new Chrome OS-powered laptops.





32 Responses to Introducing the ChromeBook [Video]

    • well, if you are allowed to download things, they'll go to your personal google cloud.

      this is really meant for tiny Netbooks- not a serious computer, just something you'd use to browse while you are about.

    • well, if you are allowed to download things, they’ll go to your personal google cloud.

      this is really meant for tiny Netbooks- not a serious computer, just something you’d use to browse while you are about.

    • Yeah, there's no need for anti-virus because it doesn't have any software!  If it's not available as an online application, you can't use it.  No Photoshop, no Inkscape, no EverQuest II, no Pro Tools.

    • Yeah, there’s no need for anti-virus because it doesn’t have any software!  If it’s not available as an online application, you can’t use it.  No Photoshop, no Inkscape, no EverQuest II, no Pro Tools.

      • Of course, 90% of what people use the internet for nowadays is Facebook and funny cat pictures*

        *Well, OK, mostly porn, but 90% of what's left is Facebook and funny cat pictures.

      • Of course, 90% of what people use the internet for nowadays is Facebook and funny cat pictures*

        *Well, OK, mostly porn, but 90% of what’s left is Facebook and funny cat pictures.

  1. I suppose if I want to limit my experience to googles apps I wouldn't have too much of a problem with it.  But seeing as I use the computer for a lot more then what they office I have no use for it.  Its only got a 16 gig SSD in it.. that means anything I want to use truely is only web based..  no thanks.  Even my mom wouldn't have any use for a computer like that.  I really wish they would stop pushing the cloud on me.  That buzz word needs to die.

  2. I'm on board. This is essentially cloud software at it's finest. As for those asking about games or photoshop, all I know is that companies like GameFly are already offering Cloud Gaming, not sure what it is, but I figure it means no needing to download games on your PC, just play them straight from their servers.

  3. I’m on board. This is essentially cloud software at it’s finest. As for those asking about games or photoshop, all I know is that companies like GameFly are already offering Cloud Gaming, not sure what it is, but I figure it means no needing to download games on your PC, just play them straight from their servers.

  4. It is in short a computer designed simply for web browsing, much like net books.  The up shot?  No need to download and install anything.  The down side?  Definitely not powerful enough for the seriously hardcore programmers/gamers.  I think this one will find a really good niche with the casual I only need to play browser based games, check email, facebook, and stuff like that.  For us geeks though, having one of these as a primary computer at all will send you into the negative on geek points, it will take away that much of your credibility from you.  Side note though, Google, you've been talking about this for a few years now.  IT'S ABOUT DAMN TIME!!!

  5. It is in short a computer designed simply for web browsing, much like net books.  The up shot?  No need to download and install anything.  The down side?  Definitely not powerful enough for the seriously hardcore programmers/gamers.  I think this one will find a really good niche with the casual I only need to play browser based games, check email, facebook, and stuff like that.  For us geeks though, having one of these as a primary computer at all will send you into the negative on geek points, it will take away that much of your credibility from you.  Side note though, Google, you’ve been talking about this for a few years now.  IT’S ABOUT DAMN TIME!!!

    • I think the "seriously hardcore programmers/gamers" are the niche here. What the Chromebook offers will likely be, on launch or in the near future, sufficient for the mass majority of computer uses.

    • I think the “seriously hardcore programmers/gamers” are the niche here. What the Chromebook offers will likely be, on launch or in the near future, sufficient for the mass majority of computer uses.

  6. So, when they say it will play videos, are they saying it will actually play the video we watched above? There are a LOT of different web video formats used out there, not to mention variations of the embedded interface (even though most are Flash based, it can still make a difference), after all. 

    Some tablets which support Flash won't even play them all. If this can do what the tablets can't, maybe it will be worth checking out.

  7. So, when they say it will play videos, are they saying it will actually play the video we watched above? There are a LOT of different web video formats used out there, not to mention variations of the embedded interface (even though most are Flash based, it can still make a difference), after all. 

    Some tablets which support Flash won’t even play them all. If this can do what the tablets can’t, maybe it will be worth checking out.

  8. Dropbox, Google Music, Google Docs, Picasa, I could go on and on and on about cloud services. But no one will listen. "If it needs to run on the computer, you can't use it."

    HENCE THE POINT OF THE CHROMEBOOK.

  9. Dropbox, Google Music, Google Docs, Picasa, I could go on and on and on about cloud services. But no one will listen. “If it needs to run on the computer, you can’t use it.”

    HENCE THE POINT OF THE CHROMEBOOK.

  10. Not sure if im sold on the idea.. especially with internet access as it is (its almost anywhere but connection speeds and strength are piddly). For the home user who wouldnt be using it on the go, they are going to look at it and immediately think "uh this thing doesnt have enough jiggabytes". For a kid this would definitely be more ideal than a netbook.. other then that I dont know.. too early to tell. This really can't be used for a lot of power users. You are already cutting out programming languages requiring compilation since you cant build your program against the internet.. interpreted languages like python may work but even then your compiling the byte code over the internet.. I think I'll stick with my i5 running Arch Linux.. doesnt boot in 8 seconds but its still 3times as fast as Win 7

  11. It's not a bad idea for those who do basic things like just checking their e-mail. It sounds good on paper; however, I do have a few concerns:

    1) Preinstalled software/adware: Anyone who has owned a prebuilt PC or an Android phone, knows what I'm talking about. The junkware that has to be removed (although in cases for Andriods they've proven difficult, if not down right impossible to do). For a project like this, I can see it taking off for certain demographics, but will they have to worry about bothersome tool bars or things that operate in the background, taking up memory and other system resources to operate (even if the user never actually uses them)?

    2) Keeping up with changing standards: This one is in reference to scalability. For this, I'm not referencing hardware (everything is probably integrated circuits and minimum specs), but more in tune with having to install new software as the internet continues to evolve. Adobe Flashplayer, Quicktime and so many other forms of software may be required to activate things ranging from YouTube videos to video links on sites such as this. If new software comes out and a website uses it, then this could present a problem if it isn't included in an update (which can in turn increase the file size and for those with caps on internet usage, this can present a problem as they have no idea how much is being used).

    3) Much of this is Cloud and internet based, which is an excellent idea for busy people on the go, or those who just need to be entertained on trips. Trouble is if you hit a dead zone while traveling, it's going to create problems with information retrieval and updating. Additionally, this means it's useless when there's no internet and the end result is going to be a lot of frustrated users who don't like being inconvenienced.

    4) Security: Having no actual antivirus is fine in terms of better performance but all systems need an operating system and (in this case) a browser. A user can still have their browser hijacked (to a site where all kinds of malware can still be uploaded) and that opens a gateway for other forms mischief. All it takes is a little creativity and some understanding about how the system works at its base and you can change up the format in order to infect a machine. This isn't to say that some hacker can magic their way into this machine; especially one that is mostly internet based, but someone is bound to spot a security hole or two and can still create some problems. It would be worth noting that some kind of policy should be set up to address this concern in the future to prevent mishaps and customer complaints from flooding in.

    • As an aside, I know patents to software and certain features to said software will be hard to acquire, so are we going to be constrained to just Google software or is there room for additional software as well?

      It should be worth noting that I'm interested to see how this can integrate with Google+

    • As an aside, I know patents to software and certain features to said software will be hard to acquire, so are we going to be constrained to just Google software or is there room for additional software as well?

      It should be worth noting that I'm interested to see how this can integrate with Google+