Why You Should ALWAYS Shield The Numeric Keypad When Using an ATM


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I’ve recently started being paranoid about shielding the numeric keypads of all ATMs I use. I guess it stands to reason since I got my debit card cloned 2 times in the past 6 months. Fortunately, banks usually reimburse the money stolen from your account because of a cloned card, but it doesn’t mean you shouldn’t be careful. Here’s a short video showing what’s going on at an ATM when someone covers or does not cover the keypad when entering their pin.

[Via Gawker]







11 Responses to Why You Should ALWAYS Shield The Numeric Keypad When Using an ATM

  1. It's interesting to see how this works from the camera point of view, and I've seen something similar somewhere else (can't remember where though)… but I'd like to know what the ATM looks like from outside of the camera perspective, as in, how obvious/inconspicuous is the pinhole camera and the card reader? Just curious :)

  2. It's interesting to see how this works from the camera point of view, and I've seen something similar somewhere else (can't remember where though)… but I'd like to know what the ATM looks like from outside of the camera perspective, as in, how obvious/inconspicuous is the pinhole camera and the card reader? Just curious :)

  3. This is also why I only withdraw money from my bank's ATM, which is protected by a security guard and two video cameras. I keep enough cash in my house for "nights out" and other "for fun only" adventures.

  4. Not one person used the Enter button on the keypad after they entered their PIN. No, they'd rather use the awkward buttons on the side of the screen that never match up exactly with the text on the screen. I do like the newer touchscreen ATM's.

    • Some ATMs do not require you to press 'Enter' after entering the PIN; once it registers four digits has been typed, it automatically checks if it's correct and either forwards to the options screen, if correct, or prompts to re-enter the PIN (or retrieve card), if incorrect.

      • I haven't come across one of those, but if you'll notice each person reached up and hit the same button on the right side after entering their PIN.

    • Some ATMs do not require you to press ‘Enter’ after entering the PIN; once it registers four digits has been typed, it automatically checks if it’s correct and either forwards to the options screen, if correct, or prompts to re-enter the PIN (or retrieve card), if incorrect.

  5. As my father had his bank account temporarily wipes by this bullshit some-odd 15 years ago it saddens me any time, anywhere, I see someone not cover their hands when putting in a pin. Kinda like giving a dirty look to someone who didn't wash their hands coming out of the bathroom.

  6. It makes more difficult recognize the numbers but in some of the cases if you look some times to the video you can recognize the patterns formed by the fingers in the keyboard… the cloners have a little harder work but doable