15 Things You Probably Didn’t Know About Star Trek

Did you know that the famous Vulcan salute was invented by Leonard Nimoy and based on a priestly blessing performed by Jewish Kohanim? Also, if you’re looking for an amazing Gift for a Star Trek fan, be sure to check out Star Trek Federation: The First 150 Years, a hardcover book documenting the first 150 years of the intergalactic democracy up until the year 2311.

[Via Reddit]




179 Responses to 15 Things You Probably Didn’t Know About Star Trek

  1. You complain about "to boldly go" being grammatically incorrect (it's not; split infinitives are a stylistic choice that have been unfairly vilified), and yet your first sentence underneath "15 things you didn't know about STAR TREK" is a complete mess:

    "…one of the largest impacts… than any other franchise."

      • An infinitive in the English language is made up of two words, "to" and what is commonly known as a verb. In actuality, the infinitive is the most basic form a verb can take, it is not made up of a verb itself. So to split it is incorrect. You cannot split a conjugation. So "To boldly go" should technically be "To go boldly." In the English world it is a debated whether or not split infinitives are actually incorrect, because they can be used as a stylistic choice. For instance, had the phrase been "To go boldly," it is rhythmically uneven and less aesthetically pleasing to the ear, so it has become famous the other way around—which is really credited to the writer's good skill.

    • You are correct. Split infinitives are fine; it's just a common stylistic choice to not split them that developed into the mistaken idea of a rule. It's just like the "rule" that prepositions cannot be placed at the end of sentences, when in fact it is a perfectly appropriate place for them to be placed in.

      • It is never a good idea to place a preposition at the end of a sentence because it does NOT sound correct. Sure, you can write how you want- that does not make it sound proper. Saying 'it is a perfectly appropriate place for them to be placed in' would have sounded just fine had you left out the in at the end. "It is a perfectly appropriate place for them to be placed." End of sentence. Nothing else is necessary- the English language can be manipuiated however you please- but this does not make it 'correct.'

      • It's the conflict between Linguistic observation and prescriptivist grammar. We who have the Linguistics viewpoint that as long as meaning isn't compromised, word order can vary feel that a split infinitive is a perfectly acceptable choice.

    • Here, here. While nuns at Catholic schools might failry criticize students in Latin class for splitting infinitives, there is no such prohibition in English.

    • it is true and I believe it is because red shirts were the lowest ranking and everyone knows in combat situations, you send the lowest ranks in first because they are expendable.

      • Unless you're Katherine Janeway, in which case the away team consists of you, your first officer, your chief engineer and your pilot, leaving your ship free to be stolen by an alien race.

      • It's because in the original series, Security personnel wore red shirts. So just about every episode where they beamed down to a new planet or a potentially hostile situation, it would be Kirk, a series lead, Spock, a series lead, and some nameless, red-shirted security officer who we'd never seen before beaming down. So in order to show just how dangerous a situation they were in, someone would have to die, and of course it wasn't going to be Kirk or Spock. And since the poor security officer is there to protect those two, with his life if necessary, he's the one who bit it. Every damned time.

        Nothing to do with rank; the colour denoted what section you were involved in.

  2. Yeah, there is nothing grammatically incorrect about split infinitives. Prove it's grammatically incorrect, I dare you.

  3. You complain about “to boldly go” being grammatically incorrect (it’s not; split infinitives are a stylistic choice that have been unfairly vilified), and yet your first sentence underneath “15 things you didn’t know about STAR TREK” is a complete mess:

    “…one of the largest impacts… than any other franchise.”

      • An infinitive in the English language is made up of two words, “to” and what is commonly known as a verb. In actuality, the infinitive is the most basic form a verb can take, it is not made up of a verb itself. So to split it is incorrect. You cannot split a conjugation. So “To boldly go” should technically be “To go boldly.” In the English world it is a debated whether or not split infinitives are actually incorrect, because they can be used as a stylistic choice. For instance, had the phrase been “To go boldly,” it is rhythmically uneven and less aesthetically pleasing to the ear, so it has become famous the other way around—which is really credited to the writer’s good skill.

    • You are correct. Split infinitives are fine; it’s just a common stylistic choice to not split them that developed into the mistaken idea of a rule. It’s just like the “rule” that prepositions cannot be placed at the end of sentences, when in fact it is a perfectly appropriate place for them to be placed in.

      • It is never a good idea to place a preposition at the end of a sentence because it does NOT sound correct. Sure, you can write how you want- that does not make it sound proper. Saying ‘it is a perfectly appropriate place for them to be placed in’ would have sounded just fine had you left out the in at the end. “It is a perfectly appropriate place for them to be placed.” End of sentence. Nothing else is necessary- the English language can be manipuiated however you please- but this does not make it ‘correct.’

    • Are you guys such nerds that you HAVE to argue the fine points of this. Just watch the damn show and enjoy it. I grew up watching in the 60's and loved it for it's ideas and adventures. Swear to god, you guys could take the fun out of anything.

  4. Yeah, there is nothing grammatically incorrect about split infinitives. Prove it’s grammatically incorrect, I dare you.

  5. That comment sounded rude, I apologize. I just meant that when people claim it’s grammatically incorrect they normally have no basis for saying so…

  6. That comment sounded rude, I apologize. I just meant that when people claim it's grammatically incorrect they normally have no basis for saying so…

  7. wow. I’m a little ashamed that I knew all of this already…..oh fuck it, I’m a proud Trekker. ^__^

  8. Also, I read somewhere that the whole "first interracial kiss" thing wasn't exactly accurate, that there were a few interaccial kisses before then. The very first interracial kiss actually took place when Sammy Davis, Jr. and Nancy Sinatra kissed briefly on the variety program "Movin' With Nancy" in December 1967 (according to the venerable Wikipedia). It was, however, the first interracial black-white kiss on a scripted non-variety television show on US TV (to be precisely accurate). ;)

        • There is no such thing as "race" anyway. It's a construct devised by 18th century racists to justify keeping black Africans in slavery. But you can continue to perpetuate this idiocy by arguing who was involved in the first "inter-racial" kiss.

      • Desi Arnaz is considered to be white. As Tim said, Hispanic is not a race (according to the US census, at least). Cuba has a high population of people descended from unmixed Spaniards (due to how long it remained a Spanish colony). Spaniards are considered white.

    • I guess 1967 was THE year for first inter-racial kisses:

      "Guess Who's Coming to Dinner" (released Dec. 1967), the kiss was between Sidney Poitier and Katharine Houghton, a young couple in love.

    • Actually, Robert Culp and Frances Nuyen were kissing onscreen a few years on television, before that Star Trek episode, in an "I Spy" episode; and there was a white male kissing an Asian woman on an episode of Man from UNCLE.

  9. There is nothing wrong with using a split infinitive in English, unless you insist on speaking English using the rules of Latin – which is a bit like playing football using the rules of tennis.

  10. There is nothing wrong with using a split infinitive in English, unless you insist on speaking English using the rules of Latin – which is a bit like playing football using the rules of tennis.

  11. How does anyone really know that the 2009 Star Trek was the most pirated? I suppose revenues are down? So the millions of dollars they claim to have made in just the first week wasn’t enough to cover production costs?! (not sure if that’s a question or a statement of possible fact.

  12. How does anyone really know that the 2009 Star Trek was the most pirated? I suppose revenues are down? So the millions of dollars they claim to have made in just the first week wasn't enough to cover production costs?! (not sure if that's a question or a statement of possible fact.

    • It's pretty easy to see how many people have pirated it; most torrents will tell you how many times a file has been downloaded.
      You can also tell by going to any flea market. Check out the selection of bootleg DVDs and see how many of them were Star Trek.
      Exact numbers are impossible to come by, but you can get a very good idea by comparing the instance of star Trek black market copies to the instances of other black market copies of other movies.

  13. Also, I read somewhere that the whole “first interracial kiss” thing wasn’t exactly accurate, that there were a few interaccial kisses before then. The very first interracial kiss actually took place when Sammy Davis, Jr. and Nancy Sinatra kissed briefly on the variety program “Movin’ With Nancy” in December 1967 (according to the venerable Wikipedia). It was, however, the first interracial black-white kiss on a scripted non-variety television show on US TV (to be precisely accurate). ;)

  14. See, now I had heard that the first interracial kiss was between Harry Belafonte and some white lady.

    • or was it ricky and lucy? maybe sidney pointier and some white chick in 'to kill a mockingbird'? can't say for certain but i've heard they all predate the kirk/uhura kiss.

      • Lucy/Ricky was not considered interracial at the time (nor should it be), and Sidney Poitier's kiss was in a FILM. Kirk/Uhura was the first interracial kiss ON AMERICAN TELEVISION. The article is correct.

        Next.

      • Sidney Poitier was in To Kill a Mockingbird? I don't think so. The black character, Tom Robinson, was played by Brock Peters.

  15. good lord its like being in an english lesson. and i thought that was all behind me. also grammar nazi – what it the correct way to spell grocers? with or without an apostrophe? hmmmn?

      • The joke is that grocers are notorious for (mis-)using an apostrophe where a plural is meant. Has any of the grammar nerds here NOT read "Eats, Shoots and Leaves"?

  16. See, now I had heard that the first interracial kiss was between Harry Belafonte and some white lady.

    • or was it ricky and lucy? maybe sidney pointier and some white chick in ‘to kill a mockingbird’? can’t say for certain but i’ve heard they all predate the kirk/uhura kiss.

      • Lucy/Ricky was not considered interracial at the time (nor should it be), and Sidney Poitier’s kiss was in a FILM. Kirk/Uhura was the first interracial kiss ON AMERICAN TELEVISION. The article is correct.

        Next.

      • Lucy/Ricky was not considered interracial at the time (nor should it be), and Sidney Poitier’s kiss was in a FILM. Kirk/Uhura was the first interracial kiss ON AMERICAN TELEVISION. The article is correct.

        Next.

  17. according to wikipedia, not that it means anything…

    A split infinitive is an English-language grammatical construction in which a word or phrase, usually an adverb or adverbial phrase, comes between the marker to and the bare infinitive (uninflected) form of a verb. A famous split infinitive occurs in the opening sequence of the Star Trek television series: to boldly go where no man has gone before. Here, the adverb “boldly” splits the full infinitive “to go.” More rarely, the term compound split infinitive is used to describe situations in which the infinitive is split by more than one word: The population is expected to more than double in the next ten years.

    As the split infinitive became more popular in the 19th century, some grammatical authorities sought to introduce a prescriptive rule against it. The construction is still the subject of disagreement among native English speakers as to whether it is grammatically correct or good style: “No other grammatical issue has so divided English speakers since the split infinitive was declared to be a solecism in the 19c: raise the subject of English usage in any conversation today and it is sure to be mentioned.”[1] However, most modern English usage guides have dropped the objection to the split infinitive.[2]

  18. according to wikipedia, not that it means anything…

    A split infinitive is an English-language grammatical construction in which a word or phrase, usually an adverb or adverbial phrase, comes between the marker to and the bare infinitive (uninflected) form of a verb. A famous split infinitive occurs in the opening sequence of the Star Trek television series: to boldly go where no man has gone before. Here, the adverb "boldly" splits the full infinitive "to go." More rarely, the term compound split infinitive is used to describe situations in which the infinitive is split by more than one word: The population is expected to more than double in the next ten years.

    As the split infinitive became more popular in the 19th century, some grammatical authorities sought to introduce a prescriptive rule against it. The construction is still the subject of disagreement among native English speakers as to whether it is grammatically correct or good style: "No other grammatical issue has so divided English speakers since the split infinitive was declared to be a solecism in the 19c: raise the subject of English usage in any conversation today and it is sure to be mentioned."[1] However, most modern English usage guides have dropped the objection to the split infinitive.[2]

  19. good lord its like being in an english lesson. and i thought that was all behind me. also grammar nazi – what it the correct way to spell grocers? with or without an apostrophe? hmmmn?

  20. That line is still grammatically incorrect as presented, because it’s a sentence fragment.

    • With all respect to Bronzelike, “to boldly go where no man has gone before” is not a sentence fragment, and therefore is not ungrammatical. This is so because it is part of the “five-year mission” explanation:

      “Its five-year mission: to explore strange new worlds, to seek out new life and new civilizations, to boldly go where no man has gone before.”

      True, the verb “is” after “five-year mission” is implied rather than stated. Nevertheless, because English is fairly flexible rather than hidebound (allowing variant ways of writing which allow considerable room for non-repetitive, imaginative, and even poetic phrasings), such an implied verb is entirely acceptable in good English. This flexibility does not mean that “anything goes” in English, but rather that good English need not be dressed forever and only in a straitjacket, but can be dressed in many appealing, interesting, and even beautiful ways.

  21. That line is still grammatically incorrect as presented, because it's a sentence fragment.

    • With all respect to Bronzelike, "to boldly go where no man has gone before" is not a sentence fragment, and therefore is not ungrammatical. This is so because it is part of the "five-year mission" explanation:

      "Its five-year mission: to explore strange new worlds, to seek out new life and new civilizations, to boldly go where no man has gone before."

      True, the verb "is" after "five-year mission" is implied rather than stated. Nevertheless, because English is fairly flexible rather than hidebound (allowing variant ways of writing which allow considerable room for non-repetitive, imaginative, and even poetic phrasings), such an implied verb is entirely acceptable in good English. This flexibility does not mean that "anything goes" in English, but rather that good English need not be dressed forever and only in a straitjacket, but can be dressed in many appealing, interesting, and even beautiful ways.

  22. The Vulcan salute is the tip of the iceberg of Jewish reference in the Original series. The whole concept of logic dictating action and being the premise of a society comes from the Talmudic tradition of debate where the best logical argument wins. Further, it is considered desirable (if not the pinnacle) to have one's mind rule his being over one's passions. Just a thought.

  23. The Vulcan salute is the tip of the iceberg of Jewish reference in the Original series. The whole concept of logic dictating action and being the premise of a society comes from the Talmudic tradition of debate where the best logical argument wins. Further, it is considered desirable (if not the pinnacle) to have one’s mind rule his being over one’s passions. Just a thought.

  24. Why can we not just enjoy the Star Trek phenomenon and shut up about grammar? This is precisely why Star Trek has such a bad stigma attached to it….all you friggin' nerds nerding it up with your need to pick everything apart. It's a fantasy world people! Turn off your brain and enjoy it! Please no comments about MY intelligence either. I have an IQ of 162. I just choose not to use it the way you nerds do!

    • I whole heartly concur. I have a an IQ of 142 and I still turn it off when I am watching. I don't care on how Klingon is spoken, or why Spock has green blood, I just watch it. (My first sentence is from Star Trek TNG episode "Where silence has lease" when Riker is turning off the auto destruct)

      • Sorry, couldn't let this slip in light of the following sentence "I whole heartly concur. I have a an IQ of 142" When bragging about your IQ take care to use the proper spelling. I assume you mean "I wholeheartedly concur"?

    • "Star Trek has such a bad stigma attached to it"
      Actually, it does not. It's a well-loved franchise around the world and across a very wide demographic.

  25. Why can we not just enjoy the Star Trek phenomenon and shut up about grammar? This is precisely why Star Trek has such a bad stigma attached to it….all you friggin’ nerds nerding it up with your need to pick everything apart. It’s a fantasy world people! Turn off your brain and enjoy it! Please no comments about MY intelligence either. I have an IQ of 162. I just choose not to use it the way you nerds do!

    • I whole heartly concur. I have a an IQ of 142 and I still turn it off when I am watching. I don’t care on how Klingon is spoken, or why Spock has green blood, I just watch it. (My first sentence is from Star Trek TNG episode “Where silence has lease” when Riker is turning off the auto destruct)

      • Sorry, couldn’t let this slip in light of the following sentence “I whole heartly concur. I have a an IQ of 142″ When bragging about your IQ take care to use the proper spelling. I assume you mean “I wholeheartedly concur”?

  26. Actually, the first interracial kiss(es) on television happened every week in the 50s on America”s most popular sitcom, I Love Lucy, between Desi Arnaz (Cuban) and Lucille Ball (White).

    • No, Cuban is a nationality, not a race. Desi Arnaz was most likely descended from the white Spaniards who colonized Cuba, making him white, too.

    • Evan, it would have been better if you did not post a
      comment. Then we would only think that you are an idiot.
      But you just had to comment, so now we are aware of the
      Awful Truth … What A Bloody Shame.
      I feel so bad for your parents.

      How about an ice cold glass of STFU ???

  27. Actually, the first interracial kiss(es) on television happened every week in the 50s on America"s most popular sitcom, I Love Lucy, between Desi Arnaz (Cuban) and Lucille Ball (White).

    • No, Cuban is a nationality, not a race. Desi Arnaz was most likely descended from the white Spaniards who colonized Cuba, making him white, too.

    • Evan, it would have been better if you did not post a

      comment. Then we would only think that you are an idiot.

      But you just had to comment, so now we are aware of the

      Awful Truth … What A Bloody Shame.

      I feel so bad for your parents.

      How about an ice cold glass of STFU ???

  28. I just like the pic of the lassie at the top of the page!

    Nah, who gives a stuff about the grammar, Star Trek is just ace. End of. I’m a bit dissapointed in Quinto and the glue, as he’s a pretty ‘Spock’ looking Spock. If that makes any sense.

    Can I also say, i’m impressed with the lack of spelling mistakes in your replies. Bad spelling really grips my sphincter. :D

    Live long peoples

    Skull
    Made in Scotland
    fae girders!

  29. As demonstrated by the following, the objection to split infinitives comes from ignorant teachers slavishly obeying a blinkered pedantry that is willfully, stupidly blind to the fact that English is not Latin. Yes, in Latin the infinitive form is always one word, e.g., "amare," meaning "to love," "videre," meaning "to see"; but in English the infinitive form is always TWO WORDS! In other words, in English the infinitive is ALWAYS AND ALREADY SPLIT INTO TWO WORDS, and good writers write good or even great English by splitting it further when inspiration strikes. "To boldly go where no man has gone before" is a thrilling example of a GREAT split infinitive. For those who object, they would be left with the limp, unnatural, awkward, and lifeless phrasings "Boldly to go where no man has gone before," or "To go boldly where no man has gone before." Do the anti-splitters really think either of these is an improvement? Break and split your chains, o ye anti-splitters! Free yourselves from an imposed and killing servitude to a dark and unworthy pedantry, and walk into the bright sunshine of sparklingly well-wrought English!

    ************************************

    The following was composed and compiled by Richard Nordquist of About.com, and can be found at http://grammar.about.com/od/rs/g/splitinfinitive….

    Definition:

    A construction in which one or more words come between the infinitive marker to and the verb (as in "to boldly go where no man has gone before").

    Examples and Observations:

    * "I don't care if he is made to go quickly, or to quickly go–but go he must!"

    (George Bernard Shaw)

    * "The only rationale for condemning the [split infinitive] construction is based on a false analogy with Latin. The thinking is that because the Latin infinitive is a single word, the equivalent English construction should be treated as if it were a single unit. But English is not Latin, and distinguished writers have split infinitives without giving it a thought. Noteworthy splitters include John Donne, Daniel Defoe, George Eliot, Benjamin Franklin, Abraham Lincoln, William Wordsworth, and Willa Cather. Still, those who dislike the construction can usually avoid it without difficulty."

    (The American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 4th edition, 2000)

    * "It seemed that he had caught [the fish] himself, years ago, when he was quite a lad; not by any art or skill, but by that unaccountable luck that appears to always wait upon a boy when he plays the wag from school."

    (Jerome K. Jerome, Three Men in a Boat, 1889)

    * "Split infinitives have been the cause of much controversy among teachers and grammarians, but the notion that they are ungrammatical is simply a myth: in his famous book Modern English Usage, Henry Fowler listed them among 'superstitions'!"

    (AskOxford.com)

    * "I was wise enough to never grow up while fooling most people into believing I had."

    (Margaret Mead)

    * "Would you convey my compliments to the purist who reads your proofs and tell him or her that I write in a sort of patois which is something like the way a Swiss waiter talks, and that when I split an infinitive, God damn it, I split it so it will stay split."

    (Raymond Chandler)

  30. As demonstrated by the following, the objection to split infinitives comes from ignorant teachers slavishly obeying a blinkered pedantry that is willfully, stupidly blind to the fact that English is not Latin. Yes, in Latin the infinitive form is always one word, e.g., "amare," meaning "to love," "videre," meaning "to see"; but in English the infinitive form is always TWO WORDS! In other words, in English the infinitive is ALWAYS AND ALREADY SPLIT INTO TWO WORDS, and good writers write good or even great English by splitting it further when inspiration strikes. "To boldly go where no man has gone before" is a thrilling example of a GREAT split infinitive. For those who object, they would be left with the limp, unnatural, awkward, and lifeless phrasings "Boldly to go where no man has gone before," or "To go boldly where no man has gone before." Do the anti-splitters really think either of these is an improvement? Break and split your chains, o ye anti-splitters! Free yourselves from an imposed and killing servitude to a dark and unworthy pedantry, and walk into the bright sunshine of sparklingly well-wrought English!

    ************************************

    The following was composed and compiled by Richard Nordquist of About.com, and can be found at http://grammar.about.com/od/rs/g/splitinfinitive….

    Definition:

    A construction in which one or more words come between the infinitive marker to and the verb (as in "to boldly go where no man has gone before").

    Examples and Observations:

    * "I don't care if he is made to go quickly, or to quickly go–but go he must!"

    (George Bernard Shaw)

    * "The only rationale for condemning the [split infinitive] construction is based on a false analogy with Latin. The thinking is that because the Latin infinitive is a single word, the equivalent English construction should be treated as if it were a single unit. But English is not Latin, and distinguished writers have split infinitives without giving it a thought. Noteworthy splitters include John Donne, Daniel Defoe, George Eliot, Benjamin Franklin, Abraham Lincoln, William Wordsworth, and Willa Cather. Still, those who dislike the construction can usually avoid it without difficulty."

    (The American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 4th edition, 2000)

    * "It seemed that he had caught [the fish] himself, years ago, when he was quite a lad; not by any art or skill, but by that unaccountable luck that appears to always wait upon a boy when he plays the wag from school."

    (Jerome K. Jerome, Three Men in a Boat, 1889)

    * "Split infinitives have been the cause of much controversy among teachers and grammarians, but the notion that they are ungrammatical is simply a myth: in his famous book Modern English Usage, Henry Fowler listed them among 'superstitions'!"

    (AskOxford.com)

    * "I was wise enough to never grow up while fooling most people into believing I had."

    (Margaret Mead)

    * "Would you convey my compliments to the purist who reads your proofs and tell him or her that I write in a sort of patois which is something like the way a Swiss waiter talks, and that when I split an infinitive, God damn it, I split it so it will stay split."

    (Raymond Chandler)

  31. That whole “the network didn’t want a woman as second in command” thing was a bullshit story told by Roddenberry for years. The fact is, they didn’t want Barrett, because she couldn’t really act, and everyone knew she was sleeping with the then-married-to-someone-else Roddenberry. That’s why he brought her back in in a bad wig as Nurse Chapel later in the first season.

  32. That whole "the network didn't want a woman as second in command" thing was a bullshit story told by Roddenberry for years. The fact is, they didn't want Barrett, because she couldn't really act, and everyone knew she was sleeping with the then-married-to-someone-else Roddenberry. That's why he brought her back in in a bad wig as Nurse Chapel later in the first season.

  33. Having been on both sides of the split infinitive, i.e., the student and the teacher, the learner and the learned, I can tell you this: the main function of a split infinitive and other such racy grammatical fare is to draw unsuspecting and bored students, particularly high school students squirming uncomfortably in their seats as they wait for the clock's hands to finally lumber to 3:05pm and the calendar to sleepily ooze into mid-June's summer recess–into a discussion, even an argument–about grammar!!–where the facts to be learned become secondary to the liveliness of the debate about aesthetics vs. structure. This result, to the teacher, means the lesson has been internalized by the student and that we done larned 'em good.

  34. Having been on both sides of the split infinitive, i.e., the student and the teacher, the learner and the learned, I can tell you this: the main function of a split infinitive and other such racy grammatical fare is to draw unsuspecting and bored students, particularly high school students squirming uncomfortably in their seats as they wait for the clock’s hands to finally lumber to 3:05pm and the calendar to sleepily ooze into mid-June’s summer recess–into a discussion, even an argument–about grammar!!–where the facts to be learned become secondary to the liveliness of the debate about aesthetics vs. structure. This result, to the teacher, means the lesson has been internalized by the student and that we done larned ‘em good.

  35. other interesting information: they changed it from “where no man has gone before” to “where no one has gone before” in the next generation. how’s that for an attempt at gender equality?

  36. other interesting information: they changed it from "where no man has gone before" to "where no one has gone before" in the next generation. how's that for an attempt at gender equality?

  37. it seems like the Queens Language (English) has boldly gone into outer space !!
    and since our American “friends” don’t speak English…

    PLEASE

    let them boldly GO !!

    they live in a world, but not as we know it !

    Stotty, since you are already UP there….

    P.B.M.U.

    • I find the whole argument to be amusing, as pointless as it may be.

      However, Frog as this persons user just made my day.

    • I find the whole argument to be amusing, as pointless as it may be.

      However, Frog as this persons user just made my day.

  38. it seems like the Queens Language (English) has boldly gone into outer space !!

    and since our American "friends" don't speak English…

    PLEASE

    let them boldly GO !!

    they live in a world, but not as we know it !

    Stotty, since you are already UP there….

    P.B.M.U.

  39. Majell barret played “Number one” in the pilot “The Cage” later reworked into the Menagerie the ONLY two parter in the original series.

    The issue was that gene wanted a woman in a command role. when showed to test audiences…the WOMEN in the audience, Not the men, replied furious…. “Who does she think she is ordering men around?” the women didn’t like it… so they changed it.

    Gene could not find anyone to make the show except for Desilu studios….

    Desi Arnez and Lucille Ball paid to have Star Trek on the air. And they were a scandalous at the time inter-racial couple. ((Lucille Ball would be the first woman shown pregnant on TV))

    The original sponsors of Star Trek at CBS were asked if Mr. Spock could smoke a Space Cigarette. Gene said no. In the future no one smokes.

  40. Majell barret played "Number one" in the pilot "The Cage" later reworked into the Menagerie the ONLY two parter in the original series.

    The issue was that gene wanted a woman in a command role. when showed to test audiences…the WOMEN in the audience, Not the men, replied furious…. "Who does she think she is ordering men around?" the women didn't like it… so they changed it.

    Gene could not find anyone to make the show except for Desilu studios….

    Desi Arnez and Lucille Ball paid to have Star Trek on the air. And they were a scandalous at the time inter-racial couple. ((Lucille Ball would be the first woman shown pregnant on TV))

    The original sponsors of Star Trek at CBS were asked if Mr. Spock could smoke a Space Cigarette. Gene said no. In the future no one smokes.

  41. “To boldly go” is technically incorrect, according to rules of English; but there is no reason for it to be so.

    As others have pointed out, Latin verbs cannot be split, nor can Greek verbs. The original logic behind the prohibition against split infinitives was, “Well, if the Greeks and Romans didn’t, then by God, neither will we!”

    Sorta silly.

    Also, as Bill Bryson has pointed out, “the man” is the nominative case, but you wouldn’t say, “the good man” is a split nominative.

    I’ve learned to relax, anal-compulsive grammar Nazi that I am.

  42. "To boldly go" is technically incorrect, according to rules of English; but there is no reason for it to be so.

    As others have pointed out, Latin verbs cannot be split, nor can Greek verbs. The original logic behind the prohibition against split infinitives was, "Well, if the Greeks and Romans didn't, then by God, neither will we!"

    Sorta silly.

    Also, as Bill Bryson has pointed out, "the man" is the nominative case, but you wouldn't say, "the good man" is a split nominative.

    I've learned to relax, anal-compulsive grammar Nazi that I am.

  43. i've never been interested in star trek. this website improve star trek's image for me though.

    and the comments made me laugh.

    thanks everyone.

    • must sa that if lively comments/disscusions like these are here to be, me like
      'n look forwrd of what to come,
      'n for me to see..

      tnx

  44. i’ve never been interested in star trek. this website improve star trek’s image for me though.
    and the comments made me laugh.
    thanks everyone.

  45. Actually, there’s nothing grammatically wrong with split infinitives. The first objections to split infinitives started in the late 18th century, and nowadays, they’re seen as grammatically correct. ~the more you know~

  46. Actually, there's nothing grammatically wrong with split infinitives. The first objections to split infinitives started in the late 18th century, and nowadays, they're seen as grammatically correct. ~the more you know~

  47. 15 things I already did know about Star Trek. Like the graphics though, and I hope this increases people's appreciation for the show

  48. No news here! Hell, they don't even know the difference between a trekker and a trekkie, yet they think they're catering to geeks?

    Where are the continuity errors?

    • Yeah, if you really want to insult the guy in the homemade Star Trek uniform or the green girl, just call them Trekkies. See how far you get before you get beaned with a plastic Spock.

  49. A more appropriate title would have been "15 things most people who don't care about Star Trek don't know and don't want to know, but are probably common knowledge among readers of this site" I admit it doesn't have the same punch

  50. yes well these solecisms may have been incorporated into every day use, but that doesn't make it any less grammatically incorrect.

    of course, all of this means that one should speak in any communicable way. However, when it comes to formal writing, one should adhere strictly to the rules of grammar.

    The most annoying solecism I hear everyone use is singular/plural dissociation.

    "Sometimes, a person just has to get their jobs done."

    Problem is PERSON is singular while THEIR and JOBS are plural.

    It's usually because one does not want to say "his or her" for fear of being cast as a PC bureaucrat. Two solutions:

    A person has to complete his or her job.

    Those persons have to complete their jobs.

    (yes persons is the plural form of person… peoples is the plural form of people)

  51. Don't know if this has been brought up yet, but NASA's Enterprise was NOT an orbiter, it was a test vehicle for gliding and landing tests, it was not considered economical to upgrade it to full function.

  52. How is the death of a member wearing a red shirt considered a phenomena ? Its simple.. wearing a red shirt was low rank ensign if i recall, and that meant that character was a single appearance, disposable character that could easily die without impacting the regular cast. You obviously can't kill off main characters much before you run out.

    • Nah, the red shirts were the basic security guys. Security gets sent along to support the guys who shouldn't really be there at all – the Captain, the Chief Science Officer, the doctor, the Operations Chief. No military unit worth its salt sends Administrative Chiefs on scout missions. You sent special teams of security, medic, science, language and xenothologists out on scout missions. But that wouldn't work for TV (or movies.) And you need a few bodies you can pop and the most likely candidates are always the grunts. So, space cops go first.

  53. Meh. Maybe its because I'm that much of a geek but I knew most of this. Didn't know about the linguistics class, census, glued fingers. Pirating and the grammatically incorrect…..don't care.

  54. Here's anothe piece of Star Trek trivia. The original 1966 version of the Enterprise was supposed to be upside down from the way it turned out on TV. Gene Roddenberry went to a studio workshop and gave his idea to a model maker who built the ship for Roddenberry. Roddenberry scheduled a meeting with studio executives about filming a pilot episode, later converted into the two-part episode "Menagerie." The completed model was sent to Roddenbery's office before he went to the meeting. The executives arrived in Roddenberry's office before he arrived, picked up the model and instantly loved it. Roddenberry's original idea had the nacelles BELOW the saucer section, but the executives thought the nacelles were above the saucer section. Roddenberry stated he could live with that minor change. The rest is history.

  55. I find that one of the little bits of Star Trek trivia that most surprises people is the name of the redhead who is responsible for producing the original series!

  56. Whovian is in the dictionary know, or so I hear, so the point about "Trekkie" being the only fan name in the dictionary might be moot.

  57. other bits:

    Desilu's Lucille Ball originally thought it was a western, due to a misunderstanding, as it had been pitched as "Wagon Train to the stars."

    Roddenberry confirmed that he considered fans are "Trekkies" in an interview before he died, not "Trekkers" as some had taken to calling themselves, as it "sounded more mature".

    2009 movie's "Ensign Olsen" was a role that had been written for JJ Abrams' BFF Greg Grunberg, but he couldn't make the shoot. When the scene involving Kirk's step-father leading into his stealing the car was cut, Grunberg replaced the actor already cast for the phone call voiceover, LOST's Brad W Henke. the reason Grunberg didn't appear onscreen? NBC didn't want to lose another main castmember of Heroes (Greg plays Matt Parkman) to Star Trek after Quinto was cast as Spock, and also denied allowing James Kyson Lee (Ando) from taking on the role of Sulu. Grunberg was also on the shortlist for the early script draft role of "Harry Mudd", a character that was cut but may still appear in future films.

    Khan Noonien Singh is the name of a real person. He served with Roddenberry in the Navy and pulled him out of the water when Gene nearly drowned. He lost track of the man before he could return a favor, but immortalized his name in Trek lore in return. The name was later changed to Soong for Next Generation as the creator of the android Data and his brothers, Lore and B9. All four NG characters were played by Brent Spiner.

  58. I just realized I know some Star Trek trivia that NONE of you know.

    In The Next Generation episode "Power Play" the mentioned Admiral Narsu is named for a real person (by his cousin who was the Science Advisor and writer on the show). He is a computer programmer I used to work with. If you see him, say hello to Admiral Narsu for me.

    T Crockett

  59. This post is wrong. The first interracial kiss was between Lucy and Ricky on the I love Lucy show back in the 50's.

  60. It makes me sad that when it came out, Star Trek was racially progressive, but it has become racially regressive. In the present day, racially diverse areas like California and Brazil have large population segments that are of mixed racial heritage. Yet somehow in the world of Star Trek, 2 centuries in the future, every human Star Trek character belongs to a clear ethnic group and the only character who represents a mixed human racial background is O'Brien's infant child in the Next Generation. Star Trek portrays a world where different races may work together in harmony, but we don't love each other–certainly not enough to have children together. While Star Trek was once ahead of the curve of social evolution, it has remained mired in the past as society to passes it by.

  61. if they wanted to be accurate to the future they would have used fewer caucasians.

    there are more and more mixed marriages in each generation so the bulk of the the world will look more like the Philippines or Mexico and South America than the United States or Europe.

  62. Actually, the network had no problem with a female second in command… they just found the actress who played Number One in the first pilot to be bland and unappealing. (Yes, I know that was Majel Barrett.)

  63. This chart is a bit off. Majel played a role in every incarnation of the Stark Trek Franchise, but she didn't play a role in every episode as the "726 episodes over 6 series and 11 films" statement implies.

    • She was the voice of the Enterprise's (and others…) Computer in ALL of the different series. So, it IS possible that she played in all of those episodes!

  64. Wrong, it's not grammatically "incorrect".
    "For the hyper-critical, 'to boldly go where no man has gone before' should be 'to go boldly. . . .' It is good to be aware that inserting one or more words between 'to' and a verb is not strictly speaking an error, and is often more expressive and graceful than moving the intervening words elsewhere; but so many people are offended by split infinitives that it is better to avoid them except when the alternatives sound strained and awkward."
    I rate these sources more highly than some dude with a blog: http://public.wsu.edu/~brians/errors/index.html http://public.wsu.edu/~brians/errors/nonerrors.ht

  65. i hate when people claim that Star Trek had the first 'interracial' on air kiss…I Love Lucy featured Lucille Ball (white) and Desi Arnez (Cuban) kissing all the time…what you REALLY mean is that it was the first black/white kiss on air…get it right.

  66. Darn, was hoping for some dish on Jerry Ryan and her costume. Guess she was just a lure to get
    anyone to view this piece.