IBM: Five Innovations We’ll See in the Next Five Years


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IBM has just released a ridiculous video listing five innovations it thinks will be commonplace by 2013. I don’t know about you, but this clip makes me think of one of those old mid 1960 documentary that tried to predict how technology would be at the end of the 20th century.

Unveiled today, the third annual “IBM Next Five in Five” is a list of innovations that have the potential to change the way people work, live and play over the next five years. The Next Five in Five is based on market and societal trends expected to transform our lives, as well as emerging technologies from IBM’s Labs around the world that can make these innovations.

[Via Gizmodo]







11 Responses to IBM: Five Innovations We’ll See in the Next Five Years

  1. Now, I'm no expert on solar cells but . . . solar cells in sidewalks? That's going to happen in the next five years? Okay, even if we *did* develop the technology to do that there'd be all kinds of logistical problems including but not limited to: dealing with the tremendous wear and tear of having your solar cells stomped on by thousands of people every day, having to weather weather (heh) conditions from snow to rain, possibly even to too much sunlight. Actually hooking these solar cells up to whatever they'll be transferring power to would be a major problem, and actually installing the cells in the first place.

    I'm thinking the connecting them to whatever's going to store the energy would be the worst. How would you do that? Drill holes through all the cement beneath the top layer of sidewalks and run cables through the sewers? to wherever you want to store energy? Not to mention you'd have to have thousands of "capillaries" connecting each individual cell to the larger wires.

    Plus, now I could be wrong about this, but I'm guessing that as these wires transfer energy, they're going to give off heat. You think sidewalks get hot now? Imagine having thousands of wires working overtime to transfer energy to some mega wire, all of them giving off waste heat. AND having all the buildings and cars around you doing nearly the EXACT SAME THING.

    Not to mention you'd probably have to do road work a lot more often, because, based on my experience, electronics aren't exactly as resilient as concrete.

  2. Now, I’m no expert on solar cells but . . . solar cells in sidewalks? That’s going to happen in the next five years? Okay, even if we *did* develop the technology to do that there’d be all kinds of logistical problems including but not limited to: dealing with the tremendous wear and tear of having your solar cells stomped on by thousands of people every day, having to weather weather (heh) conditions from snow to rain, possibly even to too much sunlight. Actually hooking these solar cells up to whatever they’ll be transferring power to would be a major problem, and actually installing the cells in the first place.

    I’m thinking the connecting them to whatever’s going to store the energy would be the worst. How would you do that? Drill holes through all the cement beneath the top layer of sidewalks and run cables through the sewers? to wherever you want to store energy? Not to mention you’d have to have thousands of “capillaries” connecting each individual cell to the larger wires.

    Plus, now I could be wrong about this, but I’m guessing that as these wires transfer energy, they’re going to give off heat. You think sidewalks get hot now? Imagine having thousands of wires working overtime to transfer energy to some mega wire, all of them giving off waste heat. AND having all the buildings and cars around you doing nearly the EXACT SAME THING.

    Not to mention you’d probably have to do road work a lot more often, because, based on my experience, electronics aren’t exactly as resilient as concrete.