Having your laptop searched at the US border – legal or intrusive?


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By Mark O’Neill

Boing Boing has highlighted an interesting page on the Electronic Frontier Foundation website which talks about a recent court ruling – United States v. Arnold – which essentially allows US border guards to search your laptop or other digital devices without legal restraint if you try to enter the United States.

This has got a lot of civil liberties groups up in arms (or as South Park likes to put it, “rabble! rabble! rabble!”), as obviously the contents of your laptop are private. You could have sensitive business information on there. For example, what if you’re a lawyer and you have confidential client information that you can’t reveal to a third party? Or on a personal level, perhaps embarrassing stuff like kinky porn which technically may be legal under the US constitution to own and look at but obviously you don’t want a border guard finding it on your computer? You might even have something REALLY downright embarrassing and reputation destroying like some Britney Spears music from iTunes.

So are there any legal ways or crafty dodges to get around this obvious violation to your privacy and civil liberties? Plus is this court ruling right? Could it be open to an appeal?

As the EFF page says, the obvious way to hide anything on a computer is encryption. If I was approaching a border and I knew my computer was going to be looked at, I would encrypt everything beforehand. But then again, an encrypted folder is a red flag to a law enforcement officer. It’s the equivalent of saying “look! I’m hiding something!”. But then I would say that this would only be a problem if you put the encrypted folder in plain sight – so hide the damn thing! I normally hide all my encrypted folders inside installed software folders and make them look like part of the software installation. Unless the stressed border guard is extremely computer savvy, how are they going to know the difference between an encrypted Truecrypt folder and a software installation folder for say Pidgin or Photoshop? Would he / she have the time to go through each and every folder and examine each one? I sincerely doubt it.

But then if the border guard DOES find an encrypted folder, do you give up the password? This is the big question isn’t it? Would YOU give up your password? Some travellers may be inclined to, just to get on their way. But the law may be on your side if you choose not to. Earlier this year a judge ruled that a man accused of having child porn on his encrypted computer was not compelled to hand over the passwords to his encrypted folders – because it would incriminate himself. Welcome to the digital 21st century. As law enforcement agencies are discovering, they are not automatically entitled to people’s passwords just because they have a badge and a gun.

If you refuse to hand over your password, at worst, all the border agents can do is turn you away from the border and refuse you entry – if you are a foreigner to the United States. If you are a US citizen, I would imagine a court appearance is not out of the question. But I would love to know what the charges would end up being – and whether the case would stand up in front of a jury. Failure To Provide A Password In The First Degree? Come on, give me a break. Go out there officer and catch some real criminals for crying out loud. Legal geeks – what’s your interpretation of this situation? A waste of taxpayers money or a matter of legal principle?

To the rest of the GAS readers – what are your thoughts on this subject? Have you taken your laptop through a border and have had to give up your files for inspection? Do you have any ingenious ways to hide digital information from prying eyes? And if push came to shove, would YOU give up your password?





53 Responses to Having your laptop searched at the US border – legal or intrusive?

  1. As always, the EFF is on the wrong side of the issue on this. Of course the United States can examine data on whatever you try to bring across the border. They can do it with your luggage, and they have ruled that the data on a hard drive is akin to papers in a briefcase.

    And despite what people like to claim, the US constitution never mentions the word privacy.

    Don't want to get caught smuggling child porn? Don't do it.

    And ICE agents don't take data, they just look at it. If they think its illegal, they copy it. If you seriously think that they are looking for corporate secrets or personal love letters, you are paranoid.

    And they likely have a higher security clearance than you do.

    If your data is encrypted and you refuse to provide them the password, the data gets copied to be cracked later, and you could find yourself in a holding cell at the border while this process happens.

    The EFF are pissed that criminals and child pornographers and people with computer plans for dirty bombs have been successfully stopped at the border.

    A Dirty Bomb was stopped.
    http://www.belch.com/blog/2006/11/16/customs-offi

    A kid-touching-clown was stopped and tazed to death in jail (YAY!)
    http://www.belch.com/blog/2007/10/10/this-is-why-

    • have to love ppl who give up freedom for security… they deserve neither. the 5th amendment does protect you from being forced to make self incriminating statements, and therefore protecting your passwords.

      the argument that if you are not doing anything wrong you have nothing to hide is complete bs. legal porn, relationship related documents, bad poetry, company secrets, medical records, naked pictures of yourself/wife/husband/gay lover, sensitive legal documents, etc… are not for random prying eyes. these are personal things we do not desire others to see for various reasons.

      People say 'I have nothing to hide!" but they are liars. There are documents that you keep that are potential sources of embarrassment for you, that you will not readily turn over. There are also people who are legally bound to hide things from others by contracts or other agreements. Doctors, lawyers, contractors, etc…

      My suggestion? If at all possible avoid bringing anything thru any security check point. fedex your tools, clothing, laptop (without any sensitive data), etc… Or buy new or rent while away from home. Security goons have no sense of humor and cannot be reasoned with. Avoid as much interaction with these awful human beings as possible.

      What about your data? Encrypt it, twice, renamed it as .iso or something, append it to the end of an unused help file, and put it online in a secure area. Or, access it remotely via VPN. Have a few gigs of data? or not going to be somewhere with net access? encrypt your data the same way and fedex it to your destination.

  2. I would not give up my password as a matter of principle (not that I do illegal activities). It seems a serious violation of my rights to have my personal files searched in the first place. Would a police officer be allowed to enter my home or car and search a file cabinet located there?

    As a side note, TrueCrypt claims to have a hidden volume feature that I have never tried. The idea (if I read it right) is to have a hidden volume within your TrueCrypt encrypted volume. You simply put some files in the encrypted volume that look legit (hopefully to disuade someone from looking further). That way if you are forced to reveal your password, the enforcer only sees the fake encyrpted files. The true contents of the hidden volume are not revealed.

    Curious how is works now… going to play

  3. I would not give up my password as a matter of principle (not that I do illegal activities). It seems a serious violation of my rights to have my personal files searched in the first place. Would a police officer be allowed to enter my home or car and search a file cabinet located there?

    As a side note, TrueCrypt claims to have a hidden volume feature that I have never tried. The idea (if I read it right) is to have a hidden volume within your TrueCrypt encrypted volume. You simply put some files in the encrypted volume that look legit (hopefully to disuade someone from looking further). That way if you are forced to reveal your password, the enforcer only sees the fake encyrpted files. The true contents of the hidden volume are not revealed.

    Curious how is works now… going to play

  4. My company requires SafeBoot on all laptops, along with USB Hasps that are also required for getting into the machine.

    Accidentally mailing the hasp to your destination is an option as they cannot force you to login without it, but they can try, though the lockout is progressive; each failed attempt adds up to 2 minutes of wait time, and it fails completely if the hasp is not plugged in.

    This does mean the chances that they'll confiscate your machine are probably higher, but they may just give up rather than deal with it.

    They say SafeBoot cannot be defeated.

  5. My company requires SafeBoot on all laptops, along with USB Hasps that are also required for getting into the machine.
    Accidentally mailing the hasp to your destination is an option as they cannot force you to login without it, but they can try, though the lockout is progressive; each failed attempt adds up to 2 minutes of wait time, and it fails completely if the hasp is not plugged in.

    This does mean the chances that they’ll confiscate your machine are probably higher, but they may just give up rather than deal with it.

    They say SafeBoot cannot be defeated.

  6. I guess the idea of shipping your laptop across the border – without the battery – isn't so laughable. But even then, I guess it could be confiscated. What a mess.

  7. I guess the idea of shipping your laptop across the border – without the battery – isn’t so laughable. But even then, I guess it could be confiscated. What a mess.

  8. If or maybe when, I need to travel using my laptop, I think I would actually make it MORE embarrassing. I would put a picture of a..um..more mature woman in a compromising position, I would make my startup wav be something equally embarrassing to the person inspecting my laptop. I would make sure that every time you open a file or folder it makes some sort of comment, I would litter my desktop with questionable but very legal pornography. I would make it so incredibly distasteful for the searcher that they would NEVER want to look in another laptop again for fear of seeing something that they just can't erase from their brain. Goatse

  9. If or maybe when, I need to travel using my laptop, I think I would actually make it MORE embarrassing. I would put a picture of a..um..more mature woman in a compromising position, I would make my startup wav be something equally embarrassing to the person inspecting my laptop. I would make sure that every time you open a file or folder it makes some sort of comment, I would litter my desktop with questionable but very legal pornography. I would make it so incredibly distasteful for the searcher that they would NEVER want to look in another laptop again for fear of seeing something that they just can’t erase from their brain. Goatse

  10. As always, the EFF is on the wrong side of the issue on this. Of course the United States can examine data on whatever you try to bring across the border. They can do it with your luggage, and they have ruled that the data on a hard drive is akin to papers in a briefcase.

    And despite what people like to claim, the US constitution never mentions the word privacy.

    Don't want to get caught smuggling child porn? Don't do it.

    And ICE agents don't take data, they just look at it. If they think its illegal, they copy it. If you seriously think that they are looking for corporate secrets or personal love letters, you are paranoid.

    And they likely have a higher security clearance than you do.

    If your data is encrypted and you refuse to provide them the password, the data gets copied to be cracked later, and you could find yourself in a holding cell at the border while this process happens.

    The EFF are pissed that criminals and child pornographers and people with computer plans for dirty bombs have been successfully stopped at the border.

    A Dirty Bomb was stopped.
    http://www.belch.com/blog/2006/11/16/customs-offi

    A kid-touching-clown was stopped and tazed to death in jail (YAY!)
    http://www.belch.com/blog/2007/10/10/this-is-why-

    • have to love ppl who give up freedom for security… they deserve neither. the 5th amendment does protect you from being forced to make self incriminating statements, and therefore protecting your passwords.

      the argument that if you are not doing anything wrong you have nothing to hide is complete bs. legal porn, relationship related documents, bad poetry, company secrets, medical records, naked pictures of yourself/wife/husband/gay lover, sensitive legal documents, etc… are not for random prying eyes. these are personal things we do not desire others to see for various reasons.

      People say ‘I have nothing to hide!” but they are liars. There are documents that you keep that are potential sources of embarrassment for you, that you will not readily turn over. There are also people who are legally bound to hide things from others by contracts or other agreements. Doctors, lawyers, contractors, etc…

      My suggestion? If at all possible avoid bringing anything thru any security check point. fedex your tools, clothing, laptop (without any sensitive data), etc… Or buy new or rent while away from home. Security goons have no sense of humor and cannot be reasoned with. Avoid as much interaction with these awful human beings as possible.

      What about your data? Encrypt it, twice, renamed it as .iso or something, append it to the end of an unused help file, and put it online in a secure area. Or, access it remotely via VPN. Have a few gigs of data? or not going to be somewhere with net access? encrypt your data the same way and fedex it to your destination.

  11. I'm betting they will have no idea what to do when I start up my computer in full text mode with my home directory chmod'd 700 :) That plus encrypting my genealogy information (genealogy info is *very* dangerous for identity theft), .pidgin, and .evolution should be enough. I don't care if they see my term paper on ext3 v. ReiserFS v. XFS.

  12. I’m betting they will have no idea what to do when I start up my computer in full text mode with my home directory chmod’d 700 :) That plus encrypting my genealogy information (genealogy info is *very* dangerous for identity theft), .pidgin, and .evolution should be enough. I don’t care if they see my term paper on ext3 v. ReiserFS v. XFS.

  13. If you do not know how to encrypt files or do not have anything to do it, just put all your files in a folder, call it something like I donno. "hosts32", zip it and rename the extention to INI, and throw it into your hosts folder or a system folder. It will be one LARGE INI file though. lol

  14. If you do not know how to encrypt files or do not have anything to do it, just put all your files in a folder, call it something like I donno. “hosts32″, zip it and rename the extention to INI, and throw it into your hosts folder or a system folder. It will be one LARGE INI file though. lol

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  16. I use full hard disk encryption with one hell of a password. If they really want what is on there, I wouldn't stop them from trying.

  17. I use full hard disk encryption with one hell of a password. If they really want what is on there, I wouldn’t stop them from trying.

  18. if data is corporate mission critical stuff, why not hand the inspecting officer your cell phone and say I am sorry sir I would like to comply but as this is not my laptop and owned by my company you need to speak to my supervisor.

  19. if data is corporate mission critical stuff, why not hand the inspecting officer your cell phone and say I am sorry sir I would like to comply but as this is not my laptop and owned by my company you need to speak to my supervisor.

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  21. To Belchspeak: Even if someone does copy your encrypted data, the amount of time and resources required to crack would make it impractical and nearly impossible — this assumes a very strong password is used (I always use a minimum of 16 characters, and my passwords are nonsensical constructions to anyone but me). Since a precedent has been set in the above-mentioned court case, there is not any point in giving up your password. Besides, most governments are always looking for ways to violate our civil liberties in the name of "protecting its citizens". It's all bollocks.

    Personally, I would refuse such a request on principle. I have nothing to hide, I don't download copyrighted material (I work in IP) or cracked software, and everything on my PC is 100% legit, but I do have some data that would be best kept private. Any law enforcement official or border agent requesting access to my data can kiss my behind.

    And isn't it hilarious that any person attempting to hack (or "accidentally" access) a U.S. government computer can be arrested and sent to jail? But the government wants unfettered access to our data? Kind of smacks of totalitarianism … or something like it. "You are free to do what we tell you."

  22. To Belchspeak: Even if someone does copy your encrypted data, the amount of time and resources required to crack would make it impractical and nearly impossible — this assumes a very strong password is used (I always use a minimum of 16 characters, and my passwords are nonsensical constructions to anyone but me). Since a precedent has been set in the above-mentioned court case, there is not any point in giving up your password. Besides, most governments are always looking for ways to violate our civil liberties in the name of “protecting its citizens”. It’s all bollocks.

    Personally, I would refuse such a request on principle. I have nothing to hide, I don’t download copyrighted material (I work in IP) or cracked software, and everything on my PC is 100% legit, but I do have some data that would be best kept private. Any law enforcement official or border agent requesting access to my data can kiss my behind.

    And isn’t it hilarious that any person attempting to hack (or “accidentally” access) a U.S. government computer can be arrested and sent to jail? But the government wants unfettered access to our data? Kind of smacks of totalitarianism … or something like it. “You are free to do what we tell you.”

  23. you are all very sad

    if you're not doing anything wrong, let them see it, they don't care any more than the person behind you does so shut up and speed up the queue

  24. you are all very sad
    if you’re not doing anything wrong, let them see it, they don’t care any more than the person behind you does so shut up and speed up the queue

  25. Matt, hear hear!

    Its also amazing to see that everyone thinks that the people that work for the government are some sort of men-in-black nefarious evil-doers. The fact is they are your neighbors and perform their duties to protect their country. They don't care what's on your system unless you are a scumbag.

    • the problem is who decides if you are a scum bag?

      lets say that you have naked pictures of your 24 year old girlfriend, but she looks like she is 12. How do you think you will be treated by the authorities?

      What if you buy a used laptop, and it has an encrypted file on it that you do not know the key to? How would you ever prove this? What authority are you ready to give the goons to extract this out of you?

      What about emails between client and lawyer? these are confidential and privilege.

      Do you really want someone else reading your IM logs? That RPG cybersex session with goatgirl19 might get you detained.

      How about some of your writings… Stephen King and Clive Barker wannabes… more reasons to detain you.

      And then there is the idea that you can trust the people who are accessing your data. Minimum wage earning authority abusing jerks with their own prejudices and agendas. How do you know what these strangers are going to do with your data? Geek Squad has been known to pass around customer's personal pictures, why do you think these security nitwits are any different?

      Remember, your neighbors are jerks. John Wayne Gacy was said to be an outstanding neighbor. The police who shot students at kent state were someones neighbors. Airport security personal are mindless goons that cannot be trusted and should be avoided.

      • Those border agents have top secret clearances. Scumbags that take photos of their 24 yo girlfriends in the nude probably don't. And they are paid way better than geek-squad twerps.

        There is no privacy at the border. Get used to it, and then get over it.

        Its not just our border, its every border. Other countries may not have caught up yet to handling data at the border, but they will. And if you get caught carrying legal porn at the US border, the worst that happens might be a smirk from the ICE agent and perhaps a note in the computer run by USVISIT. Try that at a Muslim country and you lose your freedom, or perhaps your head.

        • lolz. no. the security goons arent paid, or trained, all that more than the geek squad kids. The are jerks with security clearance. you are laying your trust in systems you dont understand and have not researched. you are also not considering the needs and desires of the private sector. some of us carry around proprietary information that have legal responsibilities for.

          How is a guy who takes pictures of his 24 yer old girlfriend a scumbag? And how would that action alone dictate the persons station in life or his ability to make money?

          there is no privacy anywhere, not just the border. This is why I support encrypting and hiding your data, and whenever possible avoid allowing it to fall into anyones hands even if encrypted.

          In some countries a single poppy seed on your shoe has been enough to jail individuals for 4 or more years. I fail to see who another country's vile behavior is beng used to justify vile behavior in our own country.

          what of data a user has a legal responsibility to protect? lawyer/client, company/contractor, misc confidentiality agreements. etc? You know, real world/business situations. I see you just ignored that concept.

          In any event, currently the 5th amendment saves us from having to give up our encryption keys.

        • ok well nameless guy you are a twat, you want them to protect you and presumably what ever mess you call a familly, but you wont trust them to turn on your computer?

          you think they are going to sit there and read through all your personall files? you may have nothing better to do with your time but these guys do

          and what are you so desperate to hide?

          if it is only for "work" reasons then is this untrained security goon going to recognize remember it understand it and memorise it so that he can sell on to your competitors who i bet are just itching to know you're every thought

        • I'm a twat because I understand people want to protect their data for both personal and legal reasons? Why would my family be messed up because I am aware of privacy concerns?

          And no, I don’t trust the border personal to thwart anything but the most obvious security threats.

          One of the realities of life is that if you allow people to snoop they will. In order to parse out the 'bad stuff' you have to look at all the stuff. Sometimes this will be done with the aid of tools that search for particular criteria; sometimes it will be done by hand. And some things learned cannot be unlearned. You cannot trust border guard with the personal details of peoples lives or with information that is legally confidential and would require a court order to obtain. Lawyer/Client correspondence and trade secrets are fine examples.

          And once data is copied it can be freely copied again. Your border personal may lose his laptop or add the files to his personal collection. Once your data is copied you have no control over how it will be distributed and do not know who’s hands it shall fall into.

          There is nothing unreasonable about wanting your private data to remain private. Outside of legal requirements, It is normal for human beings to be guarded with their intimate details. Surely you have no shared every dark thought you have ever had with another human being. You have not made publically available your childhood love letters, have you? And what about the privacy of others? Maybe those naked pictures of your girlfriend were only to be viewed by you, and not the border guard and his pals?

          If the technology was available, would you be ok with the border guards being allowed to read not only your current thoughts, but your memories without a warrant? What makes out written thoughts any different?

          I am a twat who understands that if you want something to remain private you encrypt it and obfuscate it and take measures to ensure the data is never placed in a position where others can access it. Right and wrong, legal and illegal make no difference. The forces in power do as they wish and pay no attention to these details.

        • Nameless… Give it up. You've made your point to the people that need the point made to them and people who wont understand the point no matter what, well you can't convince them.

          Be happy in that I understood everything you said and agree.

          "If you argue rankle and contradict, you may achieve victory sometimes; but it will be an empty victory because you will never get your opponents good will." -Ben Franklin

  26. Matt, hear hear!
    Its also amazing to see that everyone thinks that the people that work for the government are some sort of men-in-black nefarious evil-doers. The fact is they are your neighbors and perform their duties to protect their country. They don’t care what’s on your system unless you are a scumbag.

    • the problem is who decides if you are a scum bag?

      lets say that you have naked pictures of your 24 year old girlfriend, but she looks like she is 12. How do you think you will be treated by the authorities?

      What if you buy a used laptop, and it has an encrypted file on it that you do not know the key to? How would you ever prove this? What authority are you ready to give the goons to extract this out of you?

      What about emails between client and lawyer? these are confidential and privilege.

      Do you really want someone else reading your IM logs? That RPG cybersex session with goatgirl19 might get you detained.

      How about some of your writings… Stephen King and Clive Barker wannabes… more reasons to detain you.

      And then there is the idea that you can trust the people who are accessing your data. Minimum wage earning authority abusing jerks with their own prejudices and agendas. How do you know what these strangers are going to do with your data? Geek Squad has been known to pass around customer’s personal pictures, why do you think these security nitwits are any different?

      Remember, your neighbors are jerks. John Wayne Gacy was said to be an outstanding neighbor. The police who shot students at kent state were someones neighbors. Airport security personal are mindless goons that cannot be trusted and should be avoided.

      • Those border agents have top secret clearances. Scumbags that take photos of their 24 yo girlfriends in the nude probably don’t. And they are paid way better than geek-squad twerps.

        There is no privacy at the border. Get used to it, and then get over it.

        Its not just our border, its every border. Other countries may not have caught up yet to handling data at the border, but they will. And if you get caught carrying legal porn at the US border, the worst that happens might be a smirk from the ICE agent and perhaps a note in the computer run by USVISIT. Try that at a Muslim country and you lose your freedom, or perhaps your head.

        • lolz. no. the security goons arent paid, or trained, all that more than the geek squad kids. The are jerks with security clearance. you are laying your trust in systems you dont understand and have not researched. you are also not considering the needs and desires of the private sector. some of us carry around proprietary information that have legal responsibilities for.

          How is a guy who takes pictures of his 24 yer old girlfriend a scumbag? And how would that action alone dictate the persons station in life or his ability to make money?

          there is no privacy anywhere, not just the border. This is why I support encrypting and hiding your data, and whenever possible avoid allowing it to fall into anyones hands even if encrypted.

          In some countries a single poppy seed on your shoe has been enough to jail individuals for 4 or more years. I fail to see who another country’s vile behavior is beng used to justify vile behavior in our own country.

          what of data a user has a legal responsibility to protect? lawyer/client, company/contractor, misc confidentiality agreements. etc? You know, real world/business situations. I see you just ignored that concept.

          In any event, currently the 5th amendment saves us from having to give up our encryption keys.

        • ok well nameless guy you are a twat, you want them to protect you and presumably what ever mess you call a familly, but you wont trust them to turn on your computer?
          you think they are going to sit there and read through all your personall files? you may have nothing better to do with your time but these guys do
          and what are you so desperate to hide?
          if it is only for “work” reasons then is this untrained security goon going to recognize remember it understand it and memorise it so that he can sell on to your competitors who i bet are just itching to know you’re every thought

        • I’m a twat because I understand people want to protect their data for both personal and legal reasons? Why would my family be messed up because I am aware of privacy concerns?

          And no, I don’t trust the border personal to thwart anything but the most obvious security threats.

          One of the realities of life is that if you allow people to snoop they will. In order to parse out the ‘bad stuff’ you have to look at all the stuff. Sometimes this will be done with the aid of tools that search for particular criteria; sometimes it will be done by hand. And some things learned cannot be unlearned. You cannot trust border guard with the personal details of peoples lives or with information that is legally confidential and would require a court order to obtain. Lawyer/Client correspondence and trade secrets are fine examples.

          And once data is copied it can be freely copied again. Your border personal may lose his laptop or add the files to his personal collection. Once your data is copied you have no control over how it will be distributed and do not know who’s hands it shall fall into.

          There is nothing unreasonable about wanting your private data to remain private. Outside of legal requirements, It is normal for human beings to be guarded with their intimate details. Surely you have no shared every dark thought you have ever had with another human being. You have not made publically available your childhood love letters, have you? And what about the privacy of others? Maybe those naked pictures of your girlfriend were only to be viewed by you, and not the border guard and his pals?

          If the technology was available, would you be ok with the border guards being allowed to read not only your current thoughts, but your memories without a warrant? What makes out written thoughts any different?

          I am a twat who understands that if you want something to remain private you encrypt it and obfuscate it and take measures to ensure the data is never placed in a position where others can access it. Right and wrong, legal and illegal make no difference. The forces in power do as they wish and pay no attention to these details.

        • Nameless… Give it up. You’ve made your point to the people that need the point made to them and people who wont understand the point no matter what, well you can’t convince them.

          Be happy in that I understood everything you said and agree.

          “If you argue rankle and contradict, you may achieve victory sometimes; but it will be an empty victory because you will never get your opponents good will.” -Ben Franklin

  27. i think its fair to say that nameless guy is high, assuming he did say, as i think he did, that "Airport security personal are mindless goons that cannot be trusted" because that is the stupidest thing i've heard for a while.

    it takes all of 20 seconds for the bored guy to turn it on, see it isnt a bomb and there isnt a picture of you touching small children as your background and then give it back, but i guess some people like to keep their kiddy porn secret eh?

    and by the way, if your girlfriend looks 12 then maybe you do like a little bit of kiddy fiddling on the side

  28. i think its fair to say that nameless guy is high, assuming he did say, as i think he did, that “Airport security personal are mindless goons that cannot be trusted” because that is the stupidest thing i’ve heard for a while.
    it takes all of 20 seconds for the bored guy to turn it on, see it isnt a bomb and there isnt a picture of you touching small children as your background and then give it back, but i guess some people like to keep their kiddy porn secret eh?
    and by the way, if your girlfriend looks 12 then maybe you do like a little bit of kiddy fiddling on the side

  29. Can't you see that THEY are using all your fear of terrorism ( the use of violence and threats to intimidate or coerce, esp. for political purposes)as an excuse to take all your liberties and your so beloved freedom and no one cares ??! If that piece of news would be about Russia you all would be saying how bad this is for democracy. So wake up…

  30. Can’t you see that THEY are using all your fear of terrorism ( the use of violence and threats to intimidate or coerce, esp. for political purposes)as an excuse to take all your liberties and your so beloved freedom and no one cares ??! If that piece of news would be about Russia you all would be saying how bad this is for democracy. So wake up…

  31. The border patrol do NOT have top secret clearances! At best, they might have a secret. Most of them could not flip burgers competitively at the local burger joint. That's why they are called welfare workers. Only 20 % are doing the work while the rest read (if they can read) the paper. My laptops are encrypted and you need the dongle. Three try's is all you get, after that it's a paperweight.

  32. The border patrol do NOT have top secret clearances! At best, they might have a secret. Most of them could not flip burgers competitively at the local burger joint. That’s why they are called welfare workers. Only 20 % are doing the work while the rest read (if they can read) the paper. My laptops are encrypted and you need the dongle. Three try’s is all you get, after that it’s a paperweight.

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