Introducing the BlackBerry Curve

Blackberry CurveSince the introduction of the iPhone by Apple in January, many cell phone manufacturers have been in a race to release new iPhone-like smart mobiles that could offer some tough competition to Mr. Jobs’ expensive toy when it comes out in June. The latest one in this batch comes from Research in Motion (RIM), the creator of the famous BlackBerry. The BlackBerry Curve will be RIM’s smallest phone to date, and one of the main features that gives it an edge when compared to the iPhone (for me at least) is its full QWERTY keyboard. I don’t think the iPhone will ever be an efficient device for corporate users, who mainly use their phone for management purposes. So if you give me the choice between a $600 iPhone, and a $600 Blackberry that has iPhone-like features, I’ll jump on the Blackberry anytime.

Here are some of the Curve’s additional features:

  • E-mail and text messaging
  • Instant messaging (Supports Yahoo!, MSN Messenger and Google Talk)
  • Web browser
  • Organizer
  • Advanced phone features
  • 2.0 mega pixel digital camera
  • Media player
  • BlackBerry maps
  • Expandable memory
  • Tethered modem
  • Trackball

For now, RIM already dominates the market of smart phones, and with the release of the Blackberry Curve, they may increase their advance on a market that could, according to research firm Strategy Analytics, go up by as much as 43% this year. Here are a few pictures of the device, just to wet your appetites.

Curve - Front view          Curve - Side view 1          Curve - Back view          Curve - Side view 2





6 Responses to Introducing the BlackBerry Curve

  1. We are currently an all Palm OS Treo shop running Good Messaging. The combo works ok excpet for the frequent crashes and the Treos have to be swapped out every six months. From what I have seen on the BlackBerrys, they are much more reliable. We may have to consider a switch. Especially as they keep improving the form factor.

  2. We are currently an all Palm OS Treo shop running Good Messaging. The combo works ok excpet for the frequent crashes and the Treos have to be swapped out every six months. From what I have seen on the BlackBerrys, they are much more reliable. We may have to consider a switch. Especially as they keep improving the form factor.

  3. Yeah, we're using assorted models of Blackberry over here, and so far, I love these little toys :) They synchronize almost in real time with our exchange 2003 box via blackberry enterprise server..

    We had some problem setting everything up at 1st, but everything has been stable for the past 10 months now.

  4. Yeah, we’re using assorted models of Blackberry over here, and so far, I love these little toys :) They synchronize almost in real time with our exchange 2003 box via blackberry enterprise server..

    We had some problem setting everything up at 1st, but everything has been stable for the past 10 months now.

  5. I work for a company which gives its top executives Palm Treos. Always an issue. The phone doesn't sync right. It crashes. Every now and then a Treo completely dies and has to be exchanged. Really problematic.

    My blackberry on the other hand has always been great. Had it for 18 months now and had no problems at all.

    It's easier, faster and definitely more reliable.

    And I agree with the fact that having a Qwerty keyboard is far more efficient. Moreover, i have big fingers, and i write in Spanish a lot. So iphone wouldn't be my choice.

  6. I work for a company which gives its top executives Palm Treos. Always an issue. The phone doesn’t sync right. It crashes. Every now and then a Treo completely dies and has to be exchanged. Really problematic.
    My blackberry on the other hand has always been great. Had it for 18 months now and had no problems at all.
    It’s easier, faster and definitely more reliable.

    And I agree with the fact that having a Qwerty keyboard is far more efficient. Moreover, i have big fingers, and i write in Spanish a lot. So iphone wouldn’t be my choice.